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Great. Brilliant! I was not seeing outside the box. Good job. Thanks.

For the forum record, here is the cable that we are talking about - GZ Male EC8 Ring Terminal Cable.

Goal Zero Male EC8 to Ring Terminal Cable

IMG_3569.jpg
 
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Gosh, now that I think about it, it is sort of embarrassing that I even had to ask the question.

faceplant.jpg



Here is a better picture - at a little over three feet, when split it will stretch across the van!

IMG_3571.jpg
 

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Knarfly, or anyone else,

I’m about to pull the trigger and install this thing. Anything else I should be thinking about in relation to using the Yeti Link to charge a Yeti 3000 in particular?

I’ve got a plain vanilla 2015 T-150 with 150 Amp alternator and have been a bit concerned about trying to pull the GZ advertised “25A - 50A (300W - 750W” out of it.

I’m assuming that the $474 device has some brains and will manage everything properly.

Anybody have any real-world experience with it? Will the 150 Amp alternator do the max 50A/750 Watt charge? What about at idle? Long term consequences of challenging the alternator with all this draw?
 

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I've been reading these comments and was looking for recommendations for which solar panels are compatible with the 22v input limit that the Yeti has but it's been tough. I see a few folks in this thread use solar panels that produce quite a bit over the 22v input that Goal Zero recommends. Is that a big deal?

-Mike
 

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Here are pics from the Yeti Link cable install. Overall pretty straightforward, but as my engineer dad used to say, "the devil is in the details", so maybe these images will help others with some of the details.

And, the really great news is that the Yeti Link and the Yeti 3000 seem to be delivering on the advertised throughput, even with just a 150 Amp alternator. The input numbers on the Yeti bounce around a lot, sometimes even resetting and going to zero, but at idle it shows charging in the 100 to 200 watts range and when running on a highway at about 60 MPH, it is in the 500-700 watt range. I haven't driven a long distance yet, but going a few miles it was right up there.

Here is the cable after I split the outer sheath. It is a little tricky cutting the outer sheath without nicking the inner wires, but in the end what worked well was to just pull the wires down through the initial cut that I made in the outer sheath.
I didn't even cut off the outer sheath, I just left it there to protect the negative wires.
IMG_3574 cropped.jpg


I read elsewhere on the forum that the thread on the CCP post was 5mm (M5) 0.8 thread - and it is an 8mm hex head. The ground point between the seats is also 8mm hex head. I bought 5mm washers for the CCP post, but they were a very tight fit and I didn't want to force them on, so I ended up scrounging a larger washer. Used an extra long 8mm socket to tighten on to the CCP.

IMG_3576 rotated .jpg



Here is the CCP. I only have one mount point which you can see in the center.

IMG_3578.jpg



Here is the washer that I ended up using on the CCP it was 11/16 O.D. (about 17.5mm) and it fit perfectly. Don't know what the I.D. was, but it was larger than 5mm.

IMG_3579 rotated.jpg


It also occurred to me that I don't necessarily want the Link connected to the Yeti all of the time, especially when I'm not on a road trip and I can just top off the Yeti from home or other shore power. Since the cable to the Yeti connects to the back of the Link module, it can be inconvenient to disconnect from there, which means the best place to disconnect the cable(s) is where the Female EC8 to Ring Terminal connects to the EC8 12ft Extension Cable. So you'll likely want to make sure that you have access to those connectors and don't hide them behind your walls or cabinets.

More pictures without comments, for what they're worth:

IMG_3582.jpg
IMG_3583.jpg
IMG_3584.jpg
IMG_3585.jpg
IMG_3586.jpg
 

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I want a yeti also. A 3000 is to heavy to be taking in & out of work. I have a 1600 watt heat gun & a microwave maybe 700 or 900 watts. My POS Inergy can't even heat up my coffee sometimes & won't run the heat gun. Which GZ will work for me? I will hook it up to the van with the link. I only have a standard van 3.7 and 1 battery. Is it necessary to add a 2nd battery? Thanks for the help.
 

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I want a yeti also. A 3000 is to heavy to be taking in & out of work. I have a 1600 watt heat gun & a microwave maybe 700 or 900 watts. My POS Inergy can't even heat up my coffee sometimes & won't run the heat gun. Which GZ will work for me? I will hook it up to the van with the link. I only have a standard van 3.7 and 1 battery. Is it necessary to add a 2nd battery? Thanks for the help.
Whale,

A few thoughts off the top of my head:

1) The inverter on the current Yeti 1400 and 3000 is only 1500 watts sustained and 3000 watts peak, so it may struggle with a 1600 appliance.
2) If you search the interweb a bit looking for Goal Zero new products, you will see that they have announced a next generation Yeti coming out spread over 2020 that they are calling the X model, 3000X, 1400X, etc. On at least the higher end Yetis they will have 2000 watt inverters.
3) I've not run either the 1400 or the 3000 over the 1500 watt limit yet. They handle my small microwave well which runs around 1200 watts output as shown on the Yeti, although the rated input on the microwave is less than that. Not sure why the disparity.

A little side note vis-a-vis my cable install post: I installed the Yeti Link on the 3000 to test it all out, and I was initially bummed to see that the $400 Link was only charging the 3000 at 50-100 Watts. That was about the same as the much cheaper cigarette lighter charger which basically did the same. At first I thought that it was the best that my 150 AMP alternator was able to do. After being bummed and going in and taking a nap, I awoke to the thought that the brand new Yeti was just about fully charged before I started the test, and that the low charge rate was because the Link was managing the topping off of the battery at a lower wattage.

So I needed to drain the battery to do a real test. At that point, I hooked up a portable electric heater and a fan to the Yeti and ran them both at a total wattage of about 1300 for about an hour to drain the battery down to about 50%. After doing that the Link gave me the higher charge rates described above.
 
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Whale,

A few thoughts off the top of my head:

1) The inverter on the current Yeti 1400 and 3000 is only 1500 watts sustained and 3000 watts peak, so it may struggle with a 1600 appliance.
2) If you search the interweb a bit looking for Goal Zero new products, you will see that they have announced a next generation Yeti coming out spread over 2020 that they are calling the X model, 3000X, 1400X, etc. On at least the higher end Yetis they will have 2000 watt inverters.
3) I've not run either the 1400 or the 3000 over the 1500 watt limit yet. They handle my small microwave well which runs around 1200 watts output as shown on the Yeti, although the rated input on the microwave is less than that. Not sure why the disparity.

A little side note vis-a-vis my cable install post: I installed the Yeti Link on the 3000 to test it all out, and I was initially bummed to see that the $400 Link was only charging the 3000 at 50-100 Watts. That was about the same as the much cheaper cigarette lighter charger which basically did the same. At first I thought that it was the best that my 150 AMP alternator was able to do. After being bummed and going in and taking a nap, I awoke to the thought that the brand new Yeti was just about fully charged before I started the test, and that the low charge rate was because the Link was managing the topping off of the battery at a lower wattage.

So I needed to drain the battery to do a real test. At that point, I hooked up a portable electric heater and a fan to the Yeti and ran them both at a total wattage of about 1300 for about an hour to drain the battery down to about 50%. After doing that the Link gave me the higher charge rates described above.
Oh, to answer your 1 or 2 battery question; the Yeti and the Link have nothing to do with the number of vehicle batteries that you have; I just have one battery. Per my install post, the Link cable just connects to the CCP and not directly to any battery.
 
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I've been reading these comments and was looking for recommendations for which solar panels are compatible with the 22v input limit that the Yeti has but it's been tough. I see a few folks in this thread use solar panels that produce quite a bit over the 22v input that Goal Zero recommends. Is that a big deal?

-Mike
Goal Zero replied to my email request the other day and stated that the Renogy 100D which has an open-circuit voltage value of 22.5 will work with the Yeti's. Their documentation states that the open-circuit voltage should be below 22v.

The support email basically stated that in an ideal world that the panel would produce 22.5v but would most likely be below that. They concluded that I would be fine.

-Mike
 

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It also occurred to me that I don't necessarily want the Link connected to the Yeti all of the time, especially when I'm not on a road trip and I can just top off the Yeti from home or other shore power. Since the cable to the Yeti connects to the back of the Link module, it can be inconvenient to disconnect from there, which means the best place to disconnect the cable(s) is where the Female EC8 to Ring Terminal connects to the EC8 12ft Extension Cable. So you'll likely want to make sure that you have access to those connectors and don't hide them behind your walls or cabinets.
sorry if this is a completely stupid question, but really appreciate everyone's comments and am learning (slowly) but eagerly. To toggle the Link, (if you have upfitter switches) could you just use Switch #4 to turn the Link on or off when running the engine?
 

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Thanks for the input. So it's not going to do what I'm looking for even if I spent the $3500- 4 Grand. Bummer. I appreciate the yeti update. Like everyone else I'm trying to find the best of both.
 

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All the Goal Zero Yetis are supposed to be getting upgrades this year, and will be designated by an “x” after the name, like 200x on up through 6000x. I’m not up on the details, except that they’ll be able to power appliances that couldn’t be powered before, or that had required an adaptor.
 

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i have been using my yeti 1000 for about 2 years with 275W on top and the 12V DC charger to add while i am driving. Overall really happy with the simplicity of the setup. However, more recently i have been thinking about expanding and also wanting to get more power in. Both MPPT and higher 12V charging sound attractive. The GZ link and other options seem too overpriced and while simple to install, fall short in some areas. I came across Will Prowse's videos and saw the Victron MPPT connected with the Yeti 1000. Then I also saw the new Renogy DC2DC with MPPT and the Kisae DMT-1230/1250. While the price is above $200, these units seem to simplify things by quite a bit. I was wondering if anyone had a chance to try and hook this into their gz as a solution to charge from solar and alternator directly?
 

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I've been reading these comments and was looking for recommendations for which solar panels are compatible with the 22v input limit that the Yeti has but it's been tough. I see a few folks in this thread use solar panels that produce quite a bit over the 22v input that Goal Zero recommends. Is that a big deal?

-Mike
Any 12v panel will work, the nominal voltage will be about 20v which is within the spec you stated, if you run multiple panels install them in parallel (as opposed to series) so that you don't go over 12v.
 

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Here are pics from the Yeti Link cable install. Overall pretty straightforward, but as my engineer dad used to say, "the devil is in the details", so maybe these images will help others with some of the details.

And, the really great news is that the Yeti Link and the Yeti 3000 seem to be delivering on the advertised throughput, even with just a 150 Amp alternator. The input numbers on the Yeti bounce around a lot, sometimes even resetting and going to zero, but at idle it shows charging in the 100 to 200 watts range and when running on a highway at about 60 MPH, it is in the 500-700 watt range. I haven't driven a long distance yet, but going a few miles it was right up there.

Here is the cable after I split the outer sheath. It is a little tricky cutting the outer sheath without nicking the inner wires, but in the end what worked well was to just pull the wires down through the initial cut that I made in the outer sheath.
I didn't even cut off the outer sheath, I just left it there to protect the negative wires.
View attachment 132688

I read elsewhere on the forum that the thread on the CCP post was 5mm (M5) 0.8 thread - and it is an 8mm hex head. The ground point between the seats is also 8mm hex head. I bought 5mm washers for the CCP post, but they were a very tight fit and I didn't want to force them on, so I ended up scrounging a larger washer. Used an extra long 8mm socket to tighten on to the CCP.

View attachment 132690


Here is the CCP. I only have one mount point which you can see in the center.

View attachment 132691


Here is the washer that I ended up using on the CCP it was 11/16 O.D. (about 17.5mm) and it fit perfectly. Don't know what the I.D. was, but it was larger than 5mm.

View attachment 132692

It also occurred to me that I don't necessarily want the Link connected to the Yeti all of the time, especially when I'm not on a road trip and I can just top off the Yeti from home or other shore power. Since the cable to the Yeti connects to the back of the Link module, it can be inconvenient to disconnect from there, which means the best place to disconnect the cable(s) is where the Female EC8 to Ring Terminal connects to the EC8 12ft Extension Cable. So you'll likely want to make sure that you have access to those connectors and don't hide them behind your walls or cabinets.

More pictures without comments, for what they're worth:

View attachment 132693 View attachment 132694 View attachment 132695 View attachment 132696 View attachment 132697
Questions for you: Did you upgrade the 30amp fuse on the single CCP before hooking up the Link? And have you measured how many amps the module is drawing at max output? I am curious because I also have the standard 150amp alternator and single CCP with 30 amp fuse. My goal zero unit is in the opposite corner from the battery, and I will need a really long cable to reach it. Curious if I need to upgrade the CCP for this.

EDIT: it is a 60amp fuse! (not a 30amp; that was incorrect).
 

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Questions for you: Did you upgrade the 30amp fuse on the single CCP before hooking up the Link? And have you measured how many amps the module is drawing at max output? I am curious because I also have the standard 150amp alternator and single CCP with 30 amp fuse. My goal zero unit is in the opposite corner from the battery, and I will need a really long cable to reach it. Curious if I need to upgrade the CCP for this.
Here is the thread I was asking something similar. My CCP is 60A fuse, and the consensus is Yeti1000 will only pull 50A max. Haven't tripped it so far...I'd still like to upgrade the CCP to have more connections available in the future, but it seems to work for this.

 

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Here is the thread I was asking something similar. My CCP is 60A fuse, and the consensus is Yeti1000 will only pull 50A max. Haven't tripped it so far...I'd still like to upgrade the CCP to have more connections available in the future, but it seems to work for this.

I had it in my head that it was a 30amp fuse. You are right it is a 60amp, that makes more sense now. Thanks for the clarification.
 

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I bought a Yeti 3000 for my van and wanted to provide some feedback.

Summary: Convenient, compact, expensive

I bought the Yeti 3000 at REI using the 20% off coupon. At the same time I bought the link module.
Note that you will also need to buy the cable kit to wire it up to the alternator.

It's charged two ways, either using the single 60A CCP via the Link module or, when parked, the ability the charge from shore power. This seems to work well for my situation because I generally move campsites each night and don't like to park and stay at a location.

While the Goal Zero Link cable is quite short (2 feet?), it will reach to the Yeti if you use the CCP on the driver's seat and have the Yeti placed immediately behind the driver seat which isn't a bad location. The CCP is a bit awkward to access but otherwise is a short and easy install.
Note you will need to buy the nuts for the CCP and ground point.

Later, I installed the Yeti in a cabinet, both to clean up the cabling as well as making it harder to steal. I took off the wheels and bolted some 8020 around it so a thief would need to be just slightly more determined than the opportunistic type.

I installed this on the rear bumper as shown by others in the forum.
NOCO power plug inlet and extension cord
It was easy to install and looks good. The extension cable routes up through the van body without any new holes. I plugged it into an octopus to get multiple shore power plugs inside the van.

When shore power is available, I can plug in two wall chargers (both included in the 3000) which will recharge the 3000 if I leave it overnight. If we are on a longer trips, the captain want a hot shower every couple days so we will hit a campground and usually get shore power there.

From an output perspective, you will need to push a button to use the 120V ports, or another button to use the USB ports, or (finally) another button to use the 12V ports. You can easily see the continuous drain from the 120V inverter even if you don't have anything plugged in.
Likewise you see a smaller draw if you open up the USB ports (smaller inverter) even when you don't have anything plugged in.
If you leave the buttons pushed, they will slowly drain the battery due to the inverter load.
There is no draw on the 12V outlets if there is nothing plugged in because there is no inverter used.

In a previous van I had some trouble figuring out what was draining the battery so I like these buttons to effectively disconnect the battery from any loads.

Over the holidays, I parked it for 2+ months, turning off the wifi and lighted panel on the front, and it held its charge without any loss.

I used this cable
Anderson to ring cable
to go to a Blue Sea distribution
and then all my 12V accessories get fed through that.
Super easy and pretty clean.

The iPhone app is convenient since I have it buried in a cabinet.

The 3000 manual is here.

Irritations:
Besides the cost which was known at the start but gets reinforced every time you buy a cable, I was disappointed that you can't install the Link module (alternator charging) at the same time as the MTTP (solar charging) module. While there are two accessory slots in the Yeti 3000, both theses modules need to occupy the right accessory slot. In my perfect world, I'd have both installed so if I decided to park in a field for a week I could charge with solar. Now I just have the MPPT module sitting in a box.
At some point, if I went solar, it would take me ~15 minutes or so to switch the modules.

I can see why they are coming out with a more powerful inverter for the newer version of the 3000. At times, the 3000 won't power some items like an old circular saw due to the peak load on start. We need to be somewhat careful as I add items like a blender, microwave or toaster oven.
 
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