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I keep looking at the new Goal Zero Yeti 1400 or 3000 lithium power generators and am thinking about putting one in my van for simple house battery power. The newer models are able to charge off the alternator with the addition of that Yeti Link/Tank module for $400. I’ve watched a few videos and have talked with GZ about this and am fairly impressed with the set up and charge rates when charging off alternator. I’ll be charging an ARB fridge, lights, phone, and heater. The van is an 2019 MR w/pop top 148” LB, HD alternator and dual batteries. the biggest draw back is the ability to charge off of solar very quickly. I was never planning on using solar anyway so for my situation the GZ May be a simple alternative as compared to a more complex, expensive system. Anyone else look at the Goal Zero 1400 or 3000 for their van power needs??
 

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I am using a 1400 in my van. I have two 180W Grape solar panels for recharging.

This setup works very well for me. If I could afford it I would have gone for the 3000 for more battery.

Be sure to get the voltage regulator for your fridge if you will run it off 12V. Before I did that my fridge would turn off when the battery got below around 60%.


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If I didn’t have the pop top on the van I’d have solar panels installed. I also remember reading elsewhere about people having voltage problems with their Goal Zero 1400. I’m not sure what they were trying to power up. For the price of the 3000 unit plus link kit, one could buy a better stand alone system. Portability and ease of install is what you are paying for.
 

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I know on my baby yeti 150 the charge time from the alternator is like 8 hours. So unless you are on a long road trip charging a house battery is much easier than charging a yeti.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
With the new link expansion kit that allows you to charge off the alternator on the GZ 1400 and 3000 units the charge time is greatly reduced. On the GZ 3000 the the charge from the alternator is at 750 watts. Charge time on a fully depleated unit would be 4-5 hours of driving time.
 

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I have previously owned a Sportsmobile (E350 van conversion) without solar panels. The house AGM battery (8D) was charged by the alternator or by shore power.
This worked well for me and I suspect I'll do the same setup with the Transit.

Obviously the GZ unit should be sized to your load but in my case the 1400 would work fine.

My only concern with the GZ is the all in one design. If buttons or plugs fail, I'm not sure how easy it will be to get fixed. In a modular solution(DC-DC, monitor, battery, inverter) failed items can be diagnosed/fixed fairly quick.

I'd be interested to hear how it goes for you. Best of luck.
 

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I have a Goal Zero Yeti 1400 lithium. Charged via 2 x 100 watts roof-mounted GZ panels, shore power, and 12v GZ car charger (cig lighter). Works very well. However, my load at the moment is minimal: Maxxair 7500, LP detector, phone charging, 12v lighting, charging 3 dog e-collars & remotes, charging 2-way radios, etc.

It will also power my 10,000 btu portable air conditioner for about 1.5 hours (you need to install a microair easystart 364 to bring the LRA (compressor start surge) down to what the GZ can handle.

I like the integrated solution of the GZ, they seem to have decent build quality. I'm looking to add a couple expansion tanks and YETI LINK CAR CHARGING KIT down the road.
 

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Another one with a Goal Zero Yeti 1400 lithium here. I have a 300w Renogy panel up top. I had to purchase the MPPT module for it in order to funnel all that solar into it. It made the whole electrical process a ton easier.
 

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Another one with a Goal Zero Yeti 1400 lithium here. I have a 300w Renogy panel up top. I had to purchase the MPPT module for it in order to funnel all that solar into it. It made the whole electrical process a ton easier.


I have two 180w grape panels plugged together on my roof into one line running into my 1400. Would the MPPT thing help me get more charging?


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If I didn’t have the pop top on the van I’d have solar panels installed. I also remember reading elsewhere about people having voltage problems with their Goal Zero 1400. I’m not sure what they were trying to power up. For the price of the 3000 unit plus link kit, one could buy a better stand alone system. Portability and ease of install is what you are paying for.
Does your pop top eliminate any possibility of mounting panels on the roof? I had a pop top VW Syncro camper and was able to permanently mount a 180w panel on the roof and even haul two sea kayaks on top and still be able to lift the roof. This was possible with heavy duty struts added.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I could mount 2 100w solar panels to the top of the pop top. I’m not sure how effective they would be as most of my travels are in the spring and fall when the sun angle in Montana is low with a lot of cloudy days. I’m sure it would act act as a maintainer but I can’t depend on it as a way to charge the battery’s. I’ve looked at portable solar panels but really don’t want to deal with hauling them around. If I use the link module to charge the car battery from the alternator I’m only left with the PWM input for charging with solar which would work but not nearly as effective as the MPPT input.
 

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I could mount 2 100w solar panels to the top of the pop top. I’m not sure how effective they would be as most of my travels are in the spring and fall when the sun angle in Montana is low with a lot of cloudy days. I’m sure it would act act as a maintainer but I can’t depend on it as a way to charge the battery’s. I’ve looked at portable solar panels but really don’t want to deal with hauling them around. If I use the link module to charge the car battery from the alternator I’m only left with the PWM input for charging with solar which would work but not nearly as effective as the MPPT input.
I have a 160W solar suitcase that exceeds my every expectation. My CTEK B2B charger handles charging on the road. When camping, I use the solar suitcase, which has its own controller and is wired directly into the house battery. If I return during the day, it takes 10 seconds to reposition the solar panel for max gain.
 

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I have a 160W solar suitcase that exceeds my every expectation. My CTEK B2B charger handles charging on the road. When camping, I use the solar suitcase, which has its own controller and is wired directly into the house battery. If I return during the day, it takes 10 seconds to reposition the solar panel for max gain.

which solar suitcase do you have?
 

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I keep looking at the new Goal Zero Yeti 1400 or 3000 lithium power generators and am thinking about putting one in my van for simple house battery power. The newer models are able to charge off the alternator with the addition of that Yeti Link/Tank module for $400. I’ve watched a few videos and have talked with GZ about this and am fairly impressed with the set up and charge rates when charging off alternator. I’ll be charging an ARB fridge, lights, phone, and heater. The van is an 2019 MR w/pop top 148” LB, HD alternator and dual batteries. the biggest draw back is the ability to charge off of solar very quickly. I was never planning on using solar anyway so for my situation the GZ May be a simple alternative as compared to a more complex, expensive system. Anyone else look at the Goal Zero 1400 or 3000 for their van power needs??



I have been using the GZ Lithium 1000 for the last two months. It has exceeded my expectations thus far using only a 160W Rich solar panel as a input. Here is a description of the setup, what I am running with it, and some of its flaws: https://www.fordtransitusaforum.com/camper-vans-conversions/76096-white-whale-moby-dick-build-5.html



I was originally going to purchase the the GZ lithium 1400 (1425Wh) model for the extra juice, but it is literally twice the cost of the GZ1000 (1048Wh). For the additional 377 watt hours the GZ14000 provides costs an additional ~$800-1000 more. That didn't make any sense to me. I picked up the GZ1000 model at REI for $850 with a coupon. I could buy two lithium 1000s at a total of 2096 watt hours for the cost of the 1425 Wh provided by the GZ1400.


So if I need additional juice in the future, I'll just buy another GZ1000, They are very small and easy to carry around or store.


Hope that helps.
 

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I have the GZ1000 and just installed the Yeti Link. I haven't put it through it's paces yet, but it was easy to install and initial running looked like it could be fully charged in 3-4 hours.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Glad to see others using the GZ with good results. GZ recommends getting their voltage regulator cable when hooking up to a fridge. I like the idea of having 2 GZ units in the van. A GZ set up to charge off the alternator and one unit set up to charge off of 200w solar w/ the Victron mppt 100/30 solar controller that they sell to maximize the solar input. One on each side of the van so you don’t have to run wires across the van. Simple install and still reasonably priced when compared to a 200aH custom lithium setup. Maybe a Black Friday sale or REI coupon sale will happen soon.
 
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