Ford Transit USA Forum banner
101 - 120 of 145 Posts

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #101 ·
Pulling over some comments from another thread about stuff we learned from our last rig WRT keeping the missus happy.

Originally posted here in this thread.

And I really identify with your focus on the missus - and making it as pleasant as possible for her. Happy wife = happy life. (And the corollary: ain't mama happy, ain't nobody happy.)

When my son and I first built the Sprinter 5-6 years ago, she was indifferent: with just the bed and base of the electronics (and using propane camp stove), it was a rock-climbing metal tent. She was indifferent at best. We have camped plenty; there was no additional appeal to this for her. But once the galley was built and the abundant fridge and freezer space were set up, she started "taking over" that portion of things. Real food! Yay! The fixed-dinette layout made it homey for her: she could make food in a manner she was used to (just the induction stovetop, but cooking indoors and all the gear) while I'd sit and chat with her - just like at home. Then we'd sit to eat together. Winning.

One surprise was winter: she didn't mind the cold outside so long as the rig was warm at night. More winter rock-climbing trips!

The real surprise came when my son and I decided to "finish" some things. As with the current rig, we're very function-over-form and figured plywood and steel was a good of a finish as anything right? But when we put finish panels and doors on the galley and carpeted the rig and put rubber finish on garage area - all that stuff - it was like we'd built a brand-new van to her. Her interest went up in us going out together.

Similarly, when the galley on this rig was to have hot water and an oven, she thought those were un-necessary. Same with the potty - going outside is fine. And the shower. And the tilt-back ("couch mode") bed. As each thing got used, she felt more at home with the whole deal: water pressure is just like home; hot-water just like home; don't need a pile of pillows to sit up in bed; potty inside the van beats going out the door three times in the middle of the night. She still thinks the shower is silly; she might not change her mind on that. 😏

The things I got out of it were (are)
1. the look matters to her (finished), even though she'd say it doesn't
2. the convenience of things /just working/ makes a difference (no sous-vide for us 😄 )
3. the similarity to the "at home" experience encourages more trips (for her - I'm always down)
4. (maybe the biggest) she won't know that any of the above matter until they are done - and maybe not notice then

So... this rig went with MOAR electrical power: outlets everywhere, just like home; use any appliance you want just like home; hot /and/ cold running water in full-stream (too convenient, maybe... working on the conservation thing now). And more storage cabinets. And the internet just works - all the time. And making sure SHE can reach and use everything.

We went with the dual-swivel seats and Lagun table setup in the front; it's not /quite/ as good but it's more than close enough - especially with everything else more "like home" than before. And just using the porta-potty for liquids and plastic bags for solids.

She's on the phone downstairs right now telling a friend how convenient the new van is and we're going to take off in a few days and it's super nice. Big grins for me. 😁
 

·
Registered
2020 T350 Ecoboost AWD, High-Extended
Joined
·
144 Posts
Pulling over some comments from another thread about stuff we learned from our last rig WRT keeping the missus happy.

Originally posted here in this thread.

And I really identify with your focus on the missus - and making it as pleasant as possible for her. Happy wife = happy life. (And the corollary: ain't mama happy, ain't nobody happy.)

When my son and I first built the Sprinter 5-6 years ago, she was indifferent: with just the bed and base of the electronics (and using propane camp stove), it was a rock-climbing metal tent. She was indifferent at best. We have camped plenty; there was no additional appeal to this for her. But once the galley was built and the abundant fridge and freezer space were set up, she started "taking over" that portion of things. Real food! Yay! The fixed-dinette layout made it homey for her: she could make food in a manner she was used to (just the induction stovetop, but cooking indoors and all the gear) while I'd sit and chat with her - just like at home. Then we'd sit to eat together. Winning.

One surprise was winter: she didn't mind the cold outside so long as the rig was warm at night. More winter rock-climbing trips!

The real surprise came when my son and I decided to "finish" some things. As with the current rig, we're very function-over-form and figured plywood and steel was a good of a finish as anything right? But when we put finish panels and doors on the galley and carpeted the rig and put rubber finish on garage area - all that stuff - it was like we'd built a brand-new van to her. Her interest went up in us going out together.

Similarly, when the galley on this rig was to have hot water and an oven, she thought those were un-necessary. Same with the potty - going outside is fine. And the shower. And the tilt-back ("couch mode") bed. As each thing got used, she felt more at home with the whole deal: water pressure is just like home; hot-water just like home; don't need a pile of pillows to sit up in bed; potty inside the van beats going out the door three times in the middle of the night. She still thinks the shower is silly; she might not change her mind on that. 😏

The things I got out of it were (are)
1. the look matters to her (finished), even though she'd say it doesn't
2. the convenience of things /just working/ makes a difference (no sous-vide for us 😄 )
3. the similarity to the "at home" experience encourages more trips (for her - I'm always down)
4. (maybe the biggest) she won't know that any of the above matter until they are done - and maybe not notice then

So... this rig went with MOAR electrical power: outlets everywhere, just like home; use any appliance you want just like home; hot /and/ cold running water in full-stream (too convenient, maybe... working on the conservation thing now). And more storage cabinets. And the internet just works - all the time. And making sure SHE can reach and use everything.

We went with the dual-swivel seats and Lagun table setup in the front; it's not /quite/ as good but it's more than close enough - especially with everything else more "like home" than before. And just using the porta-potty for liquids and plastic bags for solids.

She's on the phone downstairs right now telling a friend how convenient the new van is and we're going to take off in a few days and it's super nice. Big grins for me. 😁
Just seeing your thread, incredible build man. Congrats. I still need to do a build thread, but I couldnt wait any longer to get it on the road. Currently exploring the west coast in an 85% conversion and loving it. Let’s go bouldering!!
 

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #103 ·
Just seeing your thread, incredible build man. Congrats. I still need to do a build thread, but I couldnt wait any longer to get it on the road. Currently exploring the west coast in an 85% conversion and loving it. Let’s go bouldering!!
Totally know what you mean. I didn't start the thread for a long time. Second build, so we were using this one within a month. Easy to build second time.

We're in Orange County. Plenty of climbing within a couple hours of us - Black Mountain, Tram, Joshua Tree, Holcomb, lots more. We like to spend a lot of time along the 395 corridor. If you haven't spent time in the Sequoia / Kings area or up into Mammoth, Yosemite, and Tahoe... highly recommended. A bit more unusual but the other side of the corridor is pretty cool, too: Death Valley, White Mountains / Bristlecone area is gorgeous. We're heading up on Friday... just see where we like the weather best and then hang out and climb, hike, bike...
 

·
Registered
2020 T350 Ecoboost AWD, High-Extended
Joined
·
144 Posts
Totally know what you mean. I didn't start the thread for a long time. Second build, so we were using this one within a month. Easy to build second time.

We're in Orange County. Plenty of climbing within a couple hours of us - Black Mountain, Tram, Joshua Tree, Holcomb, lots more. We like to spend a lot of time along the 395 corridor. If you haven't spent time in the Sequoia / Kings area or up into Mammoth, Yosemite, and Tahoe... highly recommended. A bit more unusual but the other side of the corridor is pretty cool, too: Death Valley, White Mountains / Bristlecone area is gorgeous. We're heading up on Friday... just see where we like the weather best and then hang out and climb, hike, bike...
Nice! I just left Tahoe, headed toward Yosemite now. Weather has been perfect everywhere I’ve been so far, other than a brief storm in Tahoe. Didn’t know Death Valley had climbing, but was going to check it out anyway so thanks for that.
 

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #105 ·
Nice! I just left Tahoe, headed toward Yosemite now. Weather has been perfect everywhere I’ve been so far, other than a brief storm in Tahoe. Didn’t know Death Valley had climbing, but was going to check it out anyway so thanks for that.
No climbing in Death Valley worth doing... just a cool place to go. If you're going through the area, take an afternoon (or more) and go to the Bristlecone Pine forest. There's some great boondock camp spots with unbelievable views up there - PM me for GPS coordinates of my secret spots. Assuming you have a heater... it gets cold up there! (Assuming it's still open - not too much snow yet)
 

·
Registered
2020 T350 Ecoboost AWD, High-Extended
Joined
·
144 Posts
Stay at the free Wildrose campground and climb Wildrose Peak in DV. Climb 2,400 feet on good trail and your reward is a 9,000-ft view. If you have 4x4, climb is substantially less.

Gorgeous! Thanks for the tip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Hi Greg,

How do you like your fan location right above where you sleep? I'm guessing you put it there for airflow with one of the windows cranked open slightly in the front?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #109 ·
...
How do you like your fan location right above where you sleep? I'm guessing you put it there for airflow with one of the windows cranked open slightly in the front?
...
Seems like the right location for it to me. Yes, driver and passenger windows must be opened for it to work well. Or really, at all. If the windows aren't opened enough for the level the fan is set to, you can feel the negative pressure in the van and the fan labors and makes more noise. Match the fan to the intake (like 30% for windows a couple inches down) and all is great.

It's also just a nice vent location to pull hot air up that direction. This weekend, it was in the high-teens to low-20s and the heater was going all night. Slight crack to the front windows and vent opened (fan not running) gets the heat flowing up and out nicely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Seems like the right location for it to me. Yes, driver and passenger windows must be opened for it to work well. Or really, at all. If the windows aren't opened enough for the level the fan is set to, you can feel the negative pressure in the van and the fan labors and makes more noise. Match the fan to the intake (like 30% for windows a couple inches down) and all is great.

It's also just a nice vent location to pull hot air up that direction. This weekend, it was in the high-teens to low-20s and the heater was going all night. Slight crack to the front windows and vent opened (fan not running) gets the heat flowing up and out nicely.
Makes sense! Does the fan noise bother you at all with the fan directly above your head? That's my only concern .... well, to be more specific, concerned about wife complaining about noise directly above her head. :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #111 ·
Makes sense! Does the fan noise bother you at all with the fan directly above your head? That's my only concern .... well, to be more specific, concerned about wife complaining about noise directly above her head. :)
No. Silent, for the most part.
 

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #112 ·
Heater enclosure, ducting, and vent

Bumper Automotive exterior Vehicle door Luggage and bags Automotive lighting



Decided to make this a separate post from the heater install. The heater worked well but the initial venting wasn't going to cut it. I looked for other vent options and nothing seemed like it would work as well as the stock stuff. But it doesn't go around corners all that well. And I wanted to get it to fit around some corners then get it to vent into the middle of the rig.

Here's where we left off:
Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Grille


Ended up getting some ducting vent that worked out well to clamp to the outside of the stock tube. Then started building up the structure over it to use that area as storage while routing the heat output to the center of the van.
Composite material Engineering Urban design Machine Rectangle


Motor vehicle Wood Gas Engineering Composite material


Automotive tire Wood Bumper Electrical wiring Gas


Floor Material property Flooring Gas Engineering


It works well. Still need to enclose right above where it comes out (last photo above) to be able to use that as well. I'll update this post when it's done.

Also two other thoughts in play: planning some sort of specific boot- and glove-warmer setup; and considering whether I'll route a small amount of heat back into the garage area. 🤔
 

·
Registered
2021 AWD 148 - Avalanche Gray
Joined
·
14 Posts
"Bed - electric raise / lower plus 'couch mode'" post

Parts list is pretty simple:
Four Leg Standing Desk Lift from Firgelli - ~$850
30 mm Square Hollow T-slot aluminum from McMasterCarr - $42 per 10' - ~10 sticks = ~$420
30 x 60 mm Square Hollow T-slot aluminum from McMasterCarr - $51 per 6' - ~4 sticks = ~$200
Bunches of connectors and nuts and bolts - $200?

Straight to videos and photos.

The raise / lower function

Couch mode

Up high
View attachment 159468

Down low
View attachment 159469


A bit of build details

The four legs are only connected at the floor. They have beefy bases with a single bolt up the middle of them (M12, IIRC), which comes through the 1/4" aluminum mount plates.

We cut aluminum plates to the largest size we could without getting in the way of the slider and the rest of the garage. That meant only two bolts on the front legs and three on the rear. They are M8s bolted all the way through the floor (with 3/4" ply on top of the floor) to plates on the bottom and nylon lock nuts.

Front mounts
View attachment 159470

Rear mounts
View attachment 159471

This photo is a little busy (taken while installing the slider) but you can see the four legs installed without the top on them.
View attachment 159472

Here's looking at the top (bed surface) from below (facing the front of the van / foot of the bed)
View attachment 159473

And here's looking the other way (rear of the van / head of the bed) before the actuators were installed
View attachment 159474

The top with no mattress. The rail is essential to hold the mattress on when doing "couch mode" - the rail at the foot is split because climbing down into the middle /over/ said rail was not good. But if no couch mode, no need for the head / back rails.

Also no need for the side-rails to be so sturdy - that's mostly because it has to stick out the back to carry the couch-mode setup.
View attachment 159475

Actuators actuated
View attachment 159476

View attachment 159477


Some notes:

Overall project notes:
  • Queen-sized bed that raises and lowers - ideally with multiple positions
  • Goal to increase garage height while easily returning to low bed / good visibility
  • Ideally little-to-no blocking of windows or visible mechanical systems
  • Also add an inclining "couch-back" mode to the bed for sitting up

• Considered purchasing a pre-made unit
• MOAB - ~$4K for manual raise/lower​
• Happijac lifting frame - ~$2300 for the lifting - still need platform​
• Both need rails up the walls on both sides - not good with windows​
• Considered linear actuators
• Stroke length is slightly less than base - 3' base = < 6' extended​
• Requires a path for the bed to slide on - not inherently stable - lots of work​
• Need Hall-effect actuators to have accurate positioning​
• Four Hall-effect lifters and a 4-way controller is more expensive than expected​
• Linear motion slides looked good - as much distance as the slide with no limits
• But then there's "rails" across the windows or something like that​
• And most seem to target horizontal, not vertical orientation​
• Same Hall-effect / controller / cost issues​
• Considered raise-lower straps (like Winnebago Revel)
• Still need controller rails like the linear slides - and some solid stop points​
• 4-leg "conference room table" lifter setup - with hall-effect lifters and controller
• If we can make it sturdy enough, that'll work great​
• Love the 4-memory-settings option​
• Only ~$800 for the lifters and controller together​

• The legs are HEAVY and the mounts that came with them were heavy as well
• Good and bad - seem really, really solid; but add an extra 100 pounds​
• Got rid of all the other mounts, used just the legs and made aluminum mounts
• Initially made angle-aluminum cross-bars for each pair then re-mounted to meet space•
• Head of our bed has angle-aluminum cross-members - un-necessary if no "couch mode"

Bed frame and surface
• 30mm extruded aluminum frame​
○ 3060 around all 4 sides for strength and minor mattress-holding​
○ 3030 cross-bars every ~9" or so - still bend but not much (good for bed)​
• 1/4" plywood surface bolted to the cross-bars with MANY bolts​
Head of bed
• The head has to be narrower to fit the queen-sized mattress into the doorway​
• No 3060 side-mounts in the head section - no sides for the mattress, basically​
Leg mounting
• 1/4" aluminum plates bolted to the bottom of each leg​
• Bolts through aluminum plates, 3/4" ply, and van floor with nylock nuts under van​
• Plastic spacers / washers for thermal isolation​
Nice job! I have a lot of similar build features, wondered if you wouldn't mind a few questions. I bought a similar table lift for the exact reasons you stated. Did you consider mounting it upside down, so that the 'top' with the wires was bolted to the floor? I was also trying to find a way not to have a lot of screws or bolts showing through the panel/upholstery. How did the Duo Lock (3M?) panels work out? How did you attache the Duo Lock? Did you consider elevating the legs of the bed so that at full height it was higher?
"...mountains are our Holy Land, and we ought to saunter through them reverently...”
View attachment 159423
View attachment 159452

1. Guiding Plan
2. Initial Order and Purchase
3. Overall build - floor, insulation, 8020, templates, etc.
4. Bed - electric raise / lower plus 'couch mode'
5. Galley - oven, hot and cold water, fresh and gray storage, shower, and ESPRESSO!
6. Electrical - 8kWh 24V Victron spend-fest
7. Garage slider - the WHOLE garage slides out
8. Removable recirculating shower
9. Propane locker- 3030 framed enclosure, vented, sealed with tape
10. Roadmaster Active Suspension - decided to try something different from sway bar
11. Air Lift Load Lifter 5000 - raise / lower rear end by remote
12. Espar B4L-M2 Space Heater install - drop the fuel tank.. yikes! locating heater in rear
12b. Enclosing heater output and routing it to van center
13. Electrical - relay control and new UI panel (10/20/2021)
14. Window covers (first batch - from Van Essentials) (11/11/2021)
15. Comments on keeping the missus happy (Happy Wife = Happy Life)

Others (TBD):
  • Refrigerator cabinet / mount (over electrical cabinet)
  • Propane locker
  • 20-gallon under-chassis fresh-water tank (currently functional but still a lot to do)
  • On-board-air system - Viair 400P Automatic with 2.5-gallon tank

  • MaxxAir fan rear install - the overkill install
  • Scopema swivels on 2020 power / heated seats - how we protected the wire and raised the seat mounts
  • Upper cabinets - 3030 framed, hinged doors, latches, varied sizes - focus on things looking "spacious"
  • 2-person seat - not comfortable for anyone other than children, runners and rock-climbers
  • DIY roof rack - HPDE bases, angle aluminum uprights, 30mm aluminum structure (and why we're probably going to re-build it)
  • Lagun table mount by slider - table for swivels AND extra counter-top

More:
  • Wall panels - attaching with Duo Lock velcro connecting - panels pop off, invisible attaching
  • Bug screens for slider and rear - I've bought four but none seem right
  • Cellular amp - in use but not "installed"
  • Exterior lights - flood lights for camping and driving - still in the boxes
  • Sound-bar and sub for music in the rig - ultimately for movies as well



The intro post:

I'm gonna put up a thread since I keep thinking I should. I'm going to try to document (with photos and parts lists) the things we did that aren't the standard stuff. So not as much attention paid to insulation, floor, swivels or solar panels - plenty of that here and elsewhere. Maybe a little bit on the aluminum extrusion model, though that's got plenty of traction as well (aka 8020).

I'll link to each post for the key build topics. Nudge me if I screw up or miss or skip something.

I'll do the "reserved post" for the first few and then just do the others as I get around to it.

If anything looks interesting but I haven't done it yet, nudge me; that's more fun than working off of my own "to do" list.



Planned but not executed at all yet - help me figure these out!
  • Stereo upgrade - speakers and whatever... amps? DSP? don't know yet
  • Finish work to pretty up the walls and doors and window openings - really lost on this
  • Window covers - might just buy them if I can get over the price
  • Bedliner cover on exterior lower plastic panels and rockers
  • Wheel well liners
  • Roof rack fairing
  • Monitor / screen for watching movies in bed
  • Floor-based vent to pull more air - or keep using the windows cracked?
  • Front skid / bash plate
  • Add RPI for remote access / monitoring
"Guiding Plan" post

When I start a project, I start with goals / objectives / boundaries, etc. Some BS from business practices, I suspect - being on both sides of the coaching game, it seems the right way to do things. Failure to plan is planning to fail and all that. It reflects the business and athlete model of mission / vision / values as well, though I'm not a fan of those words, really.

Here's what was typed before anything else really happened (formatting odd because it's dumped directly from OneNote):

Project rules
  1. Focus on objectives first
  2. Plan from objectives
  3. Always ready to abandon plan if it's not meeting objectives or a better way to meet objectives is seen
  4. Expect to redo everything 3+ times. Never leave well enough alone; it was just an idea in the first place and only execution determines efficacy
  5. Adapt the plan to reality: any roadblock requires a full rethink
Drivers: Independence, Experiences, Adventure, Action/Activities, Comfort, Security, Challenge / Sense of Accomplishment

Part time home on wheels to enable and encourage travel adventures for our family.

Budget ~90-95K (now likely $100-115K)
Boondock RV / play vehicle / pickup truck
RV off-grid 2 people, 3-5 nights, 4 seasons
Option for 4 people, 2-3 nights, 3+ seasons

• Fuel
• Water
• Electricity
• Food
Capable on mild off-road and snow - Some kind of self-rescue options (store winch, tracks, ?)

Play toys - primary focus, hence major garage focus

• Bikes
• Snowboard / split-board
• Bouldering & Climbing
• Hiking / running / backpacking
• Surfing / SUP (inflatables)
• Computers / movies - internet and movie screen

Retail examples (mostly for use of space):
• Winnebago Revel
• Sportsmobile
• VanDoIt?

Large garage, optional toilet and shower, optional 4 seats
Can we get 4 or even 5 bikes in the back?
Move bikes or boards to bumper mount to allow 4 person adventure with lower bunk bed?

Is it worth having a non-engine air conditioning unit? We don't want to be sitting in the van in the heat of day; we should be driving to somewhere we can be active. Skip AC and find places cool enough to sleep. Drive away if it's too hot. (Note: rethinking this now with the crazy heat of 2021 summer)

Building on experience and lessons from the 2011 Sprinter 170 Passenger van.

• Bought in 2016 for $22K with 130K miles
• ~190K miles in 2020 - ~15K per year
• Used for camping, climbing, biking, surfing, and touring (and transport)
• Completely self contained (inside cabin)
Likes / keep / repeat
• Modular design - change layout and use
• Front package tray / shelf (no room)
• Legit queen size bed - standard mattress
• Garage slide shelf (much larger this time)
Dislikes / change / eliminate
• Press fit galley 1" aluminum -> 3030
• Smaller 8020 hard to work -> 3030
• Bed height difficult to change > motor driven height
Add / improve
• Storage shelves / cabinets above windows
• Electric raise / lower bed
• Larger garage slide (max size)
• Use 30mm 8020 for everything
• Consider mounting in undercarriage
○ Air compressor
○ Grey water - possible freeze problem?
○ Fresh water second tank?
○ Heater
○ Batteries - not good in cold
Nice job! I have a lot of similar build features, wondered if you wouldn't mind a few questions. I bought a similar table lift for the exact reasons you stated. Did you consider mounting it upside down, so that the 'top' with the wires was bolted to the floor? I was also trying to find a way not to have a lot of screws or bolts showing through the panel/upholstery. How did the Duo Lock (3M?) panels work out? How did you attache the Duo Lock? Did you consider elevating the legs of the bed so that at full height it was higher?
 

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #114 ·
Nice job! I have a lot of similar build features, wondered if you wouldn't mind a few questions. I bought a similar table lift for the exact reasons you stated. Did you consider mounting it upside down, so that the 'top' with the wires was bolted to the floor? I was also trying to find a way not to have a lot of screws or bolts showing through the panel/upholstery. How did the Duo Lock (3M?) panels work out? How did you attache the Duo Lock? Did you consider elevating the legs of the bed so that at full height it was higher?
...
Thanks.

Yes, we considered flipping them over. Primarily thinking that it could be more solid with the larger mounts locked down to the floor. But stuck with this direction mostly because we'd already built the mounts top and bottom. I think I'd go that route if we were starting over. Or at least consider it, though routing the wires would suck - they're convenient to hide under the bed base.

Definitely would not have raised it higher than it is; would have done it lower if we could. Less interested in a high garage than in a low bed when possible - height is mostly about getting bikes and other gear under the bed. And it won't actually go much higher because of the couch-mode setup in the back; though we could have built that differently if necessary. At the high point now, it's about 1-2 inches below the middle cabinets, though... so it's fine.

My biggest concerns with the bed setup are it sways a bit if it's up high and we're on rough offroad trails. Not a big deal so long as we keep it as low as possible on rough surfaces - and it's not a big deal up high on smooth roads. But it concerns me if it were up high and we had a "excessively high energy situation" occur. Again, I prefer keeping it below the level of the galley and fridge modules for that reason.


The Duolock setup has turned out to be more awesome that expected. We're doing all the panels with it - walls, modules, whatever else. The Duolock is stuck on with the adhesive it comes with. If you haven't used the high-bond 3M adhesives, they're pretty unreal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Very nice. I'm just learning about 3M Dual-Lock now, and will definitely have some uses for that. Are you using the SJ3560 by chance? I found this interesting detail in their spec sheet about mixing densities.
Font Rectangle Parallel Engineering Audio equipment


3M Dual-Lock
 

·
Registered
2021 AWD 148 - Avalanche Gray
Joined
·
14 Posts
Thanks.

Yes, we considered flipping them over. Primarily thinking that it could be more solid with the larger mounts locked down to the floor. But stuck with this direction mostly because we'd already built the mounts top and bottom. I think I'd go that route if we were starting over. Or at least consider it, though routing the wires would suck - they're convenient to hide under the bed base.

Definitely would not have raised it higher than it is; would have done it lower if we could. Less interested in a high garage than in a low bed when possible - height is mostly about getting bikes and other gear under the bed. And it won't actually go much higher because of the couch-mode setup in the back; though we could have built that differently if necessary. At the high point now, it's about 1-2 inches below the middle cabinets, though... so it's fine.

My biggest concerns with the bed setup are it sways a bit if it's up high and we're on rough offroad trails. Not a big deal so long as we keep it as low as possible on rough surfaces - and it's not a big deal up high on smooth roads. But it concerns me if it were up high and we had a "excessively high energy situation" occur. Again, I prefer keeping it below the level of the galley and fridge modules for that reason.


The Duolock setup has turned out to be more awesome that expected. We're doing all the panels with it - walls, modules, whatever else. The Duolock is stuck on with the adhesive it comes with. If you haven't used the high-bond 3M adhesives, they're pretty unreal.
Thanks! I'll definitely try the Duolock for the panels. The "high energy situation" is a little scary for the entire build, anyone's build, but I can see for a bed raised up to full height that it could be even scarier. I'll just have to figure a way to make the connection to the bed frame as strong as possible. Mainly I need the height for my bikes, and the road bike seat for a tall guy is the tough design challenge. I have the regular length and Flares but I am going to make a spot to store 1 bike perpendicular at the rear door so that I can have the bed down and the bike in the van. Slide outs for the Mtb bikes. How do you like your Slide-Master vs just making a tray with some 500lb slides?
 

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #117 ·
Very nice. I'm just learning about 3M Dual-Lock now, and will definitely have some uses for that. Are you using the SJ3560 by chance? I found this interesting detail in their spec sheet about mixing densities.
...
Indeed: 3560 is what I'm running - "type 250" or something likethat. Quite by chance. That's what I found on Amazon.


Thanks! I'll definitely try the Duolock for the panels. The "high energy situation" is a little scary for the entire build, anyone's build, but I can see for a bed raised up to full height that it could be even scarier. I'll just have to figure a way to make the connection to the bed frame as strong as possible. Mainly I need the height for my bikes, and the road bike seat for a tall guy is the tough design challenge. I have the regular length and Flares but I am going to make a spot to store 1 bike perpendicular at the rear door so that I can have the bed down and the bike in the van. Slide outs for the Mtb bikes. How do you like your Slide-Master vs just making a tray with some 500lb slides?
Agreed: "as strong as possible" is the key. Whatever that turns out to be! 🤷‍♀️

We had heavy-duty slide-outs on the last rig and it worked great. But doing the math on the longest heavy-duty slides and the material to build it stronger started climbing up to where doing the pre-made seemed more attractive. Pretty sure we couldn't have built one this badass for this price. Or this weight. Unless I took up welding aluminum; then I'd just be trying to replicate this. And not likely I'd build something capable of 1,000 pounds while extended. 😏

A year ago, 250 pound 5-foot slides were $250-350. 500s were quite a bit more. We paid about $1000 delivered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
just wanted to say thank you for taking the time to post all of this, and to compliment your skills!! I plan on reading this a second time to process it all. Currently in mental planning phase for 2022 van on order.



Cheers.
 

·
Registered
2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #119 ·
just wanted to say thank you for taking the time to post all of this, and to compliment your skills!! I plan on reading this a second time to process it all. Currently in mental planning phase for 2022 van on order.
...
My pleasure. I'm happy to know it can be useful for some folks. Looking forward to seeing where you go with your project! 😊
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
My pleasure. I'm happy to know it can be useful for some folks. Looking forward to seeing where you go with your project! 😊
Im excited to see where I go with my project too, but currently learning about how the **** a rivnut works if that tells you where Im at. Ive wired a fair bit of my house, but seeing your electrical setup has scared me to the point that I understand why people buy goal zero's!!
 
101 - 120 of 145 Posts
Top