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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Can someone please let me know the max DC current (amps) that 2022 Transit HD350 alternator can produce continuously without overheat?

I need this data to decide how to use chassis alternator to charge lithium battery that usually draws more current than non-lithium battery during charging.

Thanks & regards,
Lee
 

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2019 HR Cargo Oxford White 148 wb 3.7L
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My understanding is that 240f is a good upper limit for reasonable alternator life, I have measured alternator temps. of 240f on a 115f day with everything on, drawing approximately 110 to 120 amps, 120amp to 150amp sustained draw on the 250 amp. alternator is a rough range, cool weather driving down the highway (good air flow) 150amp sustained draw? maybe more. Remember the van uses a low of 25 amps to a high of 90 amps (110 amps) which needs to be subtracted. I would hazard a guess of 30amp to 120amp is available for charging extra loads (batteries) with the 250 amp alternator. I would get a inexpensive IR temp gun and monitor the alternator temps. as you try and maximize the alternator output. There are many people on this forum with much more experience than me and one should be along shortly.
 

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From the 2022 BEMM, An overloaded alternator will exhibit voltage lowering below 12.8V and could lead to damage, so must be avoided.
alternator Temperature 240.8f (116C) - Voltage 12.9V
 

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2021 Transit 148 HR
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I think Ford answered the question by putting a 60A fuse on CCP1. Whether you can get more out of the alternator continuously depends on the conditions. At factory-set stock idle on a hot day with the air conditioner running you can probably count on having 70A available continuously for the van's use from CCP2 without ever getting load shedding. If you set a higher idle, you can get a bit more. If you are just doing stop & start driving, but no extended idle, some people are getting 120A without burning anything out.
 

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I think Ford answered the question by putting a 60A fuse on CCP1. Whether you can get more out of the alternator continuously depends on the conditions. At factory-set stock idle on a hot day with the air conditioner running you can probably count on having 70A available continuously for the van's use from CCP2 without ever getting load shedding. If you set a higher idle, you can get a bit more. If you are just doing stop & start driving, but no extended idle, some people are getting 120A without burning anything out.
Is there an option to have CCP2 with a single alternator? If so, that would suggest even higher limits... 🤔

Seems like the research done in another thread here suggested that the dual alternators really only matters at idle; and max of the duals is probably not very different than a single with the way Ford has them set up. But just guesswork from all the data folks have... not sure.

@bjch512, if the answer were 150A or 200A or something like that would it help you?

With the 250A alternator, the various threads here have suggested you've probably got ~150A free - limited by overheating eventually. We have the dual alternators and consistently pull 150A from ours.

What numbers are you hoping to see? How do you intend to extract this power to get it to your house batteries?
 

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i have a single alternator in my 2020 with CCP2 which is fused at 175A, no?
Don’t use it though, only use ~50A for my 40A DCDC
That's what I thought... but I can only speak from my own experience. So... since you DO have that... assuming you have both CCP1 (60A fuse) and CCP2 (175A fuse), it seems like Ford thinks it's possible to pull quite a bit of power from one alternator.

@bjch512, the one thing that we've collectively figgered out / concluded is that the single alternator can't deliver more than ~50A at idle (depending on temps and such). Those trying to get more with a single usually do a high-idle setup.

So your answer goes back to: easily ~150A; maybe over 200A. FWIW, the largest DC-DC anyone has mentioned here (IIRC) is a Sterling 120A. Then there are those doing a more custom charge at ~200A DC-DC. Then there's a few of us doing ~150A with DC-AC-DC - that's what we run in our rig. The max charge rate for our system is ~1.8kW. We hit that with 150A direct or a bit more for overflow. So, for our setup, getting ~150A steady is just right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
My understanding is that 240f is a good upper limit for reasonable alternator life, I have measured alternator temps. of 240f on a 115f day with everything on, drawing approximately 110 to 120 amps, 120amp to 150amp sustained draw on the 250 amp. alternator is a rough range, cool weather driving down the highway (good air flow) 150amp sustained draw? maybe more. Remember the van uses a low of 25 amps to a high of 90 amps (110 amps) which needs to be subtracted. I would hazard a guess of 30amp to 120amp is available for charging extra loads (batteries) with the 250 amp alternator. I would get a inexpensive IR temp gun and monitor the alternator temps. as you try and maximize the alternator output. There are many people on this forum with much more experience than me and one should be along shortly.
Thanks for the details. I guess 30 to 120 amps continuous current should be enough for charging lithium battery. Not sure why people add a DC-DC charger between alternater-chassis battery and coach lithium battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
From the 2022 BEMM, An overloaded alternator will exhibit voltage lowering below 12.8V and could lead to damage, so must be avoided.
alternator Temperature 240.8f (116C) - Voltage 12.9V
So it looks like 240.8f (116C) or 12.9V is very close to the upper limit for the alternator to go. Since lithium battery internal resistance is lower than non-lithium. Maybe that's why people usually add a DC-DC charger between alternator and lithium battery?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think Ford answered the question by putting a 60A fuse on CCP1. Whether you can get more out of the alternator continuously depends on the conditions. At factory-set stock idle on a hot day with the air conditioner running you can probably count on having 70A available continuously for the van's use from CCP2 without ever getting load shedding. If you set a higher idle, you can get a bit more. If you are just doing stop & start driving, but no extended idle, some people are getting 120A without burning anything out.
I read other article that says "CCP1 provides a constant current source of 60 amps that is live whether the vehicle engine is running or not". It looks like power source of CCP1 is actually from chassis battery?

By the way, where can I find CCP1 and CCP2 studs on 2022 Ford Transit 350 HD, where I can get power from? Thx
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Is there an option to have CCP2 with a single alternator? If so, that would suggest even higher limits... 🤔

Seems like the research done in another thread here suggested that the dual alternators really only matters at idle; and max of the duals is probably not very different than a single with the way Ford has them set up. But just guesswork from all the data folks have... not sure.

@bjch512, if the answer were 150A or 200A or something like that would it help you?

With the 250A alternator, the various threads here have suggested you've probably got ~150A free - limited by overheating eventually. We have the dual alternators and consistently pull 150A from ours.

What numbers are you hoping to see? How do you intend to extract this power to get it to your house batteries?
I'm not expert in this area, but I think 150A should be enough for charging lithium battery. Just to make sure... does 2022 Transit 350HD use 250A alternaor?
 

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2021 W2X High Roof Cargo T350, 148", EcoB, AWD, Avalanche Grey
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Thanks for the details. I guess 30 to 120 amps continuous current should be enough for charging lithium battery. Not sure why people add a DC-DC charger between alternater-chassis battery and coach lithium battery.
To get the most out of their lithium investment, many use a separate charger that can charge them to 100%. The smart charging system in the transit adds another set of challenges. It will fluctuate voltage greatly during normal driving. I see as low of 11.5 and a high of 14.5, but my DC to DC charger continues to charge at a steady rate with a lithium charge profile.

The ccps are on the left rear side of the drivers seat pedestal, under a black cap about 2" x 5". The 8mm stud is 175 amp, the 6 mm is 60 amp. Search on grounds for options. No ground is available at the ccps. Good luck.
 

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I read other article that says "CCP1 provides a constant current source of 60 amps that is live whether the vehicle engine is running or not". It looks like power source of CCP1 is actually from chassis battery?
CCP1 is fused at 60A and does not have load shedding, it should be live all the time. Most people hook up to CCP2 if they have that stud since it powers down after awhile (seems a bit variable) so you won't flat your vehicle/starter battery so easily. Both CCP1 and CCP2 are connected to the vehicle battery or batteries and the batteries are connected to the alternator, so you could say that CCP1 and CCP2 are connected to the alternator with the batteries as a buffer. I'm not clear on all the battery management that the Transit performs, but it's not as simple as you might imagine. You can read the BEMM if you want to get smart on this. The BEMM for 2021 says that you can draw up to the 175A limit of CCP2 continuously, but I think that's pretty misleading. Obviously you will quickly run out of power if you draw 175A from an 60Ah battery, or dual 60Ah batteries, so you have to mostly think about what your alternator can produce. At idle on a hot day your alternator is producing about 110A and the vehicle will consume around 40A, so you have around 70A at idle to work with. If you are driving around you get more. The BEMM has the alternator curves in it.
 
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