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I don't know that I've whined, but it definitely does add up (just replaced mine a month ago, so it's fresh in my mind). Especially when they age out and you have to replace them even though they still "look newer." And tire problems are just that much worse, plus typically a heavier vehicle which can be more of a challenge if you do need a tow -- so there is definitely motivation to keep them fresh.

What I wonder about the Super Singles is.... do people then carry two spares? One spare Super Single and then the regular spare for the front? Or do you just hope the Super Singles don't have a problem? I'm sure on a semi or huge vehicle then two spares is no big deal; but it would be kind of a lot to find room for on a smaller dually such as a T/E-350 or even 450.
I hear this across multiple transit forums, I think most of them are used vehicle owners and they do not know what they have boughten. I do not think they make super singles that small.
 

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I’d whine and bitch and moan and then wine some more to cope with the cost🍷🍷🍷
The Stimulus boosted inflation and now it is getting boosted some more.
I worry that my six year old transit tires with 13,000 miles on them might be getting dry rotted and I will experience today's replacement costs.
 

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350HD XLT DRW Eco, Quadvan 4X4, 4.10 Eaton Truetracs front and rear, Backwoods bumper, Warn winch
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getting ready to order a Hi-roof, EL Transit with EcoBoost and AWD. All the specs seem to be the same between the T-250 model and T-350 model, except GVWR. The 250 is rated for 9070 pound and the 350 is rated for 9500 pounds. All the data I am seeing on the web appear to indicate both vehicles weigh the same (same curb weight). I've even found out that the same leaf spring is used as replacement part for 150, 250, and 350.

So, what is different in the 350 model that gives it 430 pounds more payload capacity?
The price difference is $1250.
My 350-HD has the dualies in the rear, which is a big difference. I'm not sure, but the rear sway bar may also be different.
 

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My 350-HD has the dualies in the rear, which is a big difference. I'm not sure, but the rear sway bar may also be different.
He is asking about the T350, not the T350HD. No dualies.
 

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This is likely aimed at the homeless. Maybe we should do something about housing?

Either way, their overly broad law to punish the homeless—for being homeless—also ensnares vanlifers and RVers on their way between camping locations. This is not the first law like this, though most I have heard of are more local than state level.

There would be simple ways to address the problem of abusing rest areas. As you say, 8-10 hours max is one. Another would be to require all belongings to stay in the vehicle while staying. But no, the lazy politicians hit all of us with a big hammer.

And a felony? As in required jail time?
Good info. I may actively boycott TN during my van travels after seeing this. I had a really nice couple of visits to Nashville a few years ago (fly in, fly out), but so far haven't had any plans to head that way in the van.

Cheers.
 

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When I see the same "homeless" guy panhandling for "gas" or "food" or "repairs" money at the same truck stop for months on end when I know where he parks at night miles away I begin to think "homeless" for many is a life choice.
TN's law is a reaction (maybe not as well thought out as should have been) to people abusing public property.
So we should all boycott TN.
 

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In 1974 I chose to be homeless for six months during the warmer part of the year. In front of the university at lunch time I panhandled $40 dollars a day, This only required about two hours of effort on my part. With this money I partied all night every night. It was tougher panhandling for money on weekends but five nights a week it was good times.
Half the college kids lived in places that were like hippy communes that were called Co-ops, If you knew a college kid you could sleep and shower at the co-op's commons. If all else failed the jesus freak co-op's would take you in, But they wanted you to pray a lot and work in the garden.
 
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