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Discussion Starter · #2,782 ·
For sure. We have a place in Mammoth that we share with other families. And other times we just stay in the van. But it's 5-6 hours to drive there; not that bad once we're used to it, I guess. We /almost/ bought a full-time place there three years ago... but /that/ seemed like a hassle. 😄

Pretty stoked to get a couple late-season extra days in the last few weeks! 🏂
When I first moved to the SF Bay Area, people here were extolling it's virtues; "You snowboard? You'll love it here, it's really close to the mountains!". A 3 hour drive is not "close". Anything more than a 30 minute drive to the lifts is not "close". 😒

I like the June Lake area, and have been thinking of getting some land there and building a vacation home. I don't know how their hill is, I've never ridden there.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2,828 ·
I finally got around to changing the spark plugs.
Planned to do it at 100k, did it today at 109k.
(I was bizzy, I had to make a Model-T out of plywood and 2x4s, and everything else, for a musical)

There are plenty of videos so I won't add a bunch of details, but since it was my first time it was a 2-beer job (1 beer=1 hour). This included watching a video again to find bolts I couldn't see.

The plugs all came out easy, but the two front drivers' side coil bolts froze in the imbedded knurled nut after getting them about 2/3 out. The nut just spun in the plastic. I tried some penetrant but that didn't work. Not my first time under the shade tree working on cars; I drilled a small hole in the side of the nut (angle from above) and inserted a piece of bicycle wheel spoke (ALWAYS have some around, very handy) to hold it while I got the bolt out. Cleaned the bolts with a die (5x.8mm) and put them back in with the spoke in place, then pulled it out.

Coil boots looked new, the plugs weren't too bad.

Vehicle Hood Motor vehicle Car Automotive tire

Jeans Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Grey

Automotive tire Font Auto part Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system


There were no sparkplugs in my Model-T, I didn't have enough time to make it too authentic...
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Black Black-and-white
 

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Discussion Starter · #2,832 ·
I changed the rear brake pads.

I had already ordered pads and was waiting for the time to change them. The other day I noticed a grinding noise when braking; never heard it until the radio was off. So, it's time.
Upon removal of the pads, I discovered ONE pad (inner passenger) was starting to fade to metal (rotor was unscarred). All the other pads had 4-8mm remaining after installing them 60k miles ago. The inner pads wore faster on my van for whatever reason, the outer pads were the ones with 8mm remaining, basically only worn 1/4-1/3 of the way.

SO GLAD I bought the brake cylinder tool, it was a snap to get the piston in, unlike the first time when I had to pry and turn at the same time. No new bolts needed since I only removed the caliper frame. About 1/2 hour total for everything.


What I discovered that wasn't shown in the "how-to" videos:
The inner pads have a peg on them that looks like it's supposed to fit into the hole on the cylinder, so that needs to be lined up when you put the caliper frame back on. I realized this by noticing how much wear that one pad had on it compared to the others, and it was almost exactly the same depth as that peg sticks out! The dirt marks show that it eventually found it's way into the hole, but it was probably not lined up from day one, and thus the extra wear. The inner pad on the other side had the peg broken off, and had 4mm remaining contrast to less than 1mm remaining on the one with the misaligned peg. Both the outer pads had 8mm remaining.

Conclusion:
Make sure the peg lines up with the holes in the cylinder; OR grind off the peg, as it doesn't appear to serve any real function.
Ceramic bake pads properly installed should last a normal driver at least 100k miles. It should be noted that I have slotted rotors, and that probably extends pad life.
 
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