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I've previously insulated the front doors with Noico and Thinsulate, and also the did the same to the two rear doors then put passenger panels up to cover the rear doors. That made a huge difference in the noise level inside. Yesterday I did the ceiling and the difference was very noticeable. I bet once the side walls get done it will be as quiet as a luxury car.
So Noico has additional noise reduction benefits than just Thisulate alone as some suggest is all that is necessary?
 

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I really don't know since i didn't try just one or the other. My research showed that Noico was pretty good at low booming sound levels and Thinsulate was better at midrange and higher. Using a 20%-25% coverage I was looking at about $100 of Noico so figured I'd do it since once I stuck the Thinsulate to the metal there would be no way to add Noico later.

I have no regrets bases on how quiet the van is.
Thanks for the honest answer. That's pretty much where my head is at. Not a lot of time or cost, jut a bit more weight.
 

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Went after the rear doors today. Turns out the door trim kits from the passenger van are incompatible with the configuration the cargo van uses. ****.
Bummer, but thanks for posting. Just saved me a lot of internet search to buy something that won't work.
Hard to understand why it would make economic sense to differentiate the doors. Henry must be rolling over.
Lobstah, Eh!
 

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Functional front-pin rotating drawers of the same physical dimensions of slide out drawers, occupying the the same footprint, for one. Hover cabinets are actually do-able with enough money and a big enough power source. They don't alter the time/space relationship, I don't know how to do that.
Side by side drawers with boxes 1/2 the height of the drawer face. One box, top justified to drawer face, one bottom justified. Same footprint as opening (but not the same height). Perhaps the designer will compromise. Plenty of space to waste in a van. If that's not sufficient, I'd suggest you contact Dr. Emory Erickson.
 

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Like this? Only bigger
I had discounted this idea, because drawer is defined by motion in horizontal plane and same footprint specification is not met. I have see a fun piece of art furniture with adjacent drawers like that where drawer bottoms radii had gear teeth, so they would open synchronously.

I do"on't know why, but I was actually thinking about this some more. If there "happened to be" unoccupied space next to the cabinet equal t (hypotenuse - width) on the one side and the framing was strong enough to be cantilevered, @surly Bill 's designer's requirements could be met. I don't see any unoccupied adjacent space constraint in the design request. 🤓

While I am "lawyering" my way out of this, compressible or flexible materials could also solve the design problem. The designer requirement didn't actually say anything about the drawer being functionally useful. Which wouldn't necessarily be a requirement for a designer ... says the engineer. Dali drawers?

Now if I can just figure out how to fit 10 lbs of sh!t into my 5 lb van.
 

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Step 1: eliminate 3 lbs of stuff.

It is all trade offs.
So I just need to change the design requirements to solve 60% of my problem?
Typical engineer response.:)

I once had a boss that we engineers accused of replying to his bossed requests to put 10 lb in a 5 lb bag of not only saying it was possible but offering that he could save him money while doing it. Then he tossed the task over us.
 

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Mythbusters did it.

They compressed the 10 lbs of sh!t down to 7.5 lbs and half it's original volume. That fit neatly inside a 5 lbs bag.
I get the density increase, but the mass reduction has got me confused. Might be a good way to generate energy to charge batteries. Lead bulkhead is highly recommended. Unless of course, they were smoking the sh!t. Dave's not here man.
 

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Today I cleaned up the electrical under the front passenger seat, installed my passenger seat armrest, swivel, and then put everything back together. Also painted one of my murphy bed frames but that's not too exciting.
View attachment 145640

Managed to fit everything under the front seat. 120AH battery, Renogy DCC50S, Wagan 1500 inverter, and DC fusebox. It's a simple setup, been running it for a few months to see how it works, and so far it's doing the job. I can run the fridge all night and the battery is still at 12.4v in the morning. I have a portable Renogy 200w folding solar panel that I position out in the sun as I generally camp in the shade.

Everything fits nicely under the swivel adapter.
That's impressive packaging. How are you running the AC and DC output wiring to the van?
 

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Thanks. DC is run from the fusebox next to the DCC50S to the different areas in the van. AC right now is just a simple 6ft extension cord run to the kitchen cabinet. At some point I'll add a breaker box and real AC outlets. But that's farther down the list. Right now I'm just working on function.

Believe it or not, I can get two of those batteries under the passenger seat with all that stuff. Yeah, it's tight, but it leaves me room to grow if needed.

I can reach all the fuses through the gap in the swivel seat and seat base. It's like it was made for it.
Yea. It looks like there is room to spare. . I was wondering about the fuses. Guess you covered everything!
I'll be using lithium, so that's room to store a lot of juice. Having the DC electrical components so close to the CCP is really good. I have other multi use plans for the space in back of the drivers swivel seat so I was thinking I might need to locate the electrical system remotely. Now that might not be needed. I also don't really care for locating a furnace under the passenger seat. THANKS.
 

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Held a virtual walkthrough/Q&A with a couple kids from a local tech highschool. They want to build out their AWD Safari and go travelling this summer.

I told them to get sleeping bags, sleeping pads, a fan and to GTFO! 😋 They want some basic murphy beds and a super simple solar set up. Should be fun! Gonna stop by once their build starts and give them some crazy ideas. 🙂
Kid's these days. Can't go road trip camping without a van. Civic was a major upgrade from a bicycle for me.
Point then in the direction of Provan TIger GT. Not a class B but coolest Astro/Safari camper ever.
 

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Yeah!

The other thing that happened in the van today was a bourbon fueled celebration of better days to come. Talked about all kinds of big things. It was amazing... but, now I'm shitfaced.
What happens when you fill up an engineer with bourbon and hopes of a bright future?
You get a philosopher.
I could have been mean and gone down the old curmudgeon comment route.
I'm with you. Currently celebrating with one of Patchogues finest malted barley products
(even if it is now owned by Inbev).
Stay safe
 

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Ford engineering are idiots. Looks good on the computer screen ,must be good in real life , dumb assess.
Engineers are idiots. Engineering is idiotic. I respectfully disagree, I hove know several Ford engineers over the years and they are quite intelligent and practical. The corporate structure and short approach to management is problematic.

What does any of this have to do with the benefits of installing a bulkhead?
 

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You can't use plain words when speaking to management and be seen as credible. It's quality, quantity or timing (schedule) choose two ... then they still ignore the engineers.

My favorite variant on this team is from Keith Bontrager as it relates to bicycles "strong, light, cheap: pick two" Then he sold his soul to Trek. Now he's a "brand".
 

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Replaced rear brake pads.one pads was a little under 3mm, the rest were about 4 mm, 22,400 miles. Don't even think about not getting the caliper piston retract tool, even with the tool there is a little bit of a learning curve. ($20 amazon) replaced with Akebono ceramic brake pads, heard good things about these brake pads, and the price was right, for those heavy brake user's keep eye on rear brake pad's, there is no warning light. The front pads were fine, at least half of the pad left, expect to get 50k miles from front brake pads.
I have exclusively used Akebono on my Hondas/Acura "forever". Work great, long lasting. Well worth the small premium (says the king of cheap). Plan do do so when time comes with the Transit. Made in America.
 

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The Left rear caliper winds in clockwise, The Right rear caliper winds in counter clockwise, the tool set comes with Left and Right handed threaded arbors, The tool has to apply downward pressure while rotating the brake caliper piston, if you just rotate the piston without downward pressure it will not retract, the piston will just spin, the first side I snugged up the tool to apply downward pressure (to much apparently) and had to put a cheater pipe on the tommy bar (which bent the tommy bar). some Preload but not to much, then it would rotate, had to adjust the Preload (loosen) approx. every 90 degree's of rotation, (it would get tight and not rotate) I think because the thread pitch of the Tool doesn't match the pitch of the brake caliper piston.
I didn't try using the Right handed tool on the Right rear brake caliper,( which you have to wind in counter clockwise).
it might work, but for $23 dollars, and the rate I am going thru rear brake pads, I will get my money's worth out of the tool.
Thanks for the tip on the preload issue. Hopefully I'll remember when the time comes. Looking around at the pictures on the internet, it looks line all of the cheap kits use the same arbors (see now I know the correct term).
 

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Since I am an amateur I just change the time unit of measure from hours to days. Brakes job, I start right after breakfast.
Yikes I can't imagine how long a van build will take.
 

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I got a Mini-Me for my Big T. Today was picture day.

Big T was in the shop for 9 weeks, and I didn't enjoy driving my old pickup, having to seek out bathrooms when out for the day. I decided to sell the old truck, and get a second van -- one that could share duties as daily driver, and get me better gas mileage... AND extend the life of the big Transit.

The Transit Connect is a 2013, the final year of the first generation in the US. This one has 5000 original miles on it, a real find, since most have been used for service vehicles, and are often seen with 150-250k miles on the clock. The TC got 28.5 mpg on the 230 mile trip home.

If anyone complains about a Transit being spartan, or unrefined, hah! The little Turkish built TCs are pretty crude, compared to a big Transit. But, it does have the same generation of SYNC as my Transit, and a few more options that the service vehicles usually lack.

View attachment 148608
I believe you are on the wrong forum. I think you might get better response on Ford Transit Connect Forum :)
Nice find, looks minty mint. Enjoy.
 

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Some of my projects now have an estimated time to finish of days becoming weeks.
I have realized that my approach of trying to utilize as much as possible of the space within an irregular shape like the transit van is very time consuming😟.
WOW. I'm not the only one. Much of my training and professional career revolved around methods, layout, ergonomics, efficiency, optimization and cost reduction. And you think you have problems!
 
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