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I recently started insulation install by doing small channels and the three cargo doors. As expected, slider and right sided cargo door had plastic vapor barrier in place behind the plastic paneling. Left sided cargo door...nothing. Has anyone else encountered this? I'm not particularly concerned as the inside of the door was completely dry, I just found it extremely odd.

Thanks.
 

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I haven't opened my rear doors up yet to verify, but it might have just got missed at the factory.
 

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I recently started insulation install by doing small channels and the three cargo doors. As expected, slider and right sided cargo door had plastic vapor barrier in place behind the plastic paneling. Left sided cargo door...nothing. Has anyone else encountered this? I'm not particularly concerned as the inside of the door was completely dry, I just found it extremely odd.

Thanks.
I just did the same thing on my 2021 March arrival 350 HR extended and was also puzzled at the missing plastic sheet over the drivers side rear door. What was more concerning was the one of four missing bolts holding down the passenger's seat when I did the swivel conversion! I am now looking much closer at build quality as I uncover areas for conversion. I must say that besides those two glaring misses, the rest of the van seems to be quite well built with pretty good attention to detail.
 

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My 2018 didn't have a vapor barrier on the driver's rear door either. I put one in using some butyl tape and a shower curtain. The shower curtain is fairly durable plastic and they are cheap. The reason that I put it in was dust. For whatever reason there was more dust in the cavity on the driver's side than on the passenger side rear doors. I also added thinsulate while I was in there.

-Mike
 

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And just why are you all concerned about air (vapor) leaks?
For the most part, the Transit is a mostly-airtight shell which needs ventilation to reduce the human-created vapor (beathing, cooking, etc.) inside the envelope. That's why we install ventilation fans.
 

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And just why are you all concerned about air (vapor) leaks?
For the most part, the Transit is a mostly-airtight shell which needs ventilation to reduce the human-created vapor (beathing, cooking, etc.) inside the envelope. That's why we install ventilation fans.
I'm under the impression that ford has vapor barriers on doors with locks and electrical to help prevent premature failure due to the long term impacts of condensation forming on the exposed metals parts of these components. Also to prevent accumulated condensation from causing short circuits and spurious operations (like windows rolling down and doors unlocking).
 

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I'm under the impression that ford has vapor barriers on doors with locks and electrical to help prevent premature failure due to the long term impacts of condensation forming on the exposed metals parts of these components. Also to prevent accumulated condensation from causing short circuits and spurious operations (like windows rolling down and doors unlocking).
The question might be from where is the vapor coming from? In an automotive application, I expect the concern is vapor from the outside. In a camper conversion, I am quite sure the most significant vapor will originate from inside the van.
What is really needed in a camper conversion is a high volume ventilation fan. I'd bet such a fan will dominate over minor air leaks.
 
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