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Hello!
Looking to insulate my Ford Transit floor for Vanlife. It came with the factory felt and rubber mat that fits perfectly to the floor. I’m wondering if anyone has used this for insulation before? Was thinking of just adding subfloor on top and then vinyl floor on that. Hoping to save some time and money this way but also don’t want to set my van up for failure. Thanks!
 

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My thinking was I did not want organic material like the recycled jeans on the back to be in contact with the metal floor. Any spills or condensation could create a feeding ground for mold, etc. I had a bad experience with a leak on a VW camper van and I am not interested in repeating that experience. in vanlife as in life in general, things get spilled and condensation happens.
 

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Depends on the climate you plan to spend time in. If you actually want to insulate against real heat and cold, the factory floor mat isn't the way.
 

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I would recommend that your floor be something that you can scrub clean, with as few seams as possible. A single sheet of commercial grade vinyl flooring over a plywood base works good.
 

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I went with the factory floor on my build. Lots of insulation on the sides and roof but completely stock plastic floor. 12 months, 12,000 miles later, covering everything from blazing hot desert summers to frigid alpine nights and I could not be happier. I wanted a durable floor that could be cleaned easily and often. What we found is that keeping dust, sand and gravel out is a challenge. From actual experience it seems that heat lost or gained through the floor is a fraction of that from the sides and roof - particularly when you have bets, storage, galley etc., taking up floor space.

IMHO most builds seems to start with a floor, massive house batteries, solar and complex electrics - we have found that none of it is required for a camper that gets driven from location to location every other day or so. That said, my build was deliberately utilitarian - which prioritized minimal weight and flexible configurations. Multi-use Adventure Van Build
 

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A permeable material in contact with the steel floor works both ways. Condensation can form on the inner steel surface but can escape as well. I like the idea of a soft material touching the floor as I think the paint, which is essential to prevent corrosion of the floor, will last longer.

As mentioned before, I've got 1/2 in. plywood over the factory mat for my sound equipment, utility and camper van and, at 4 years and ~25k miles, so far so good.

--Frank
 

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In a room full of [n] Transit owners / Insulation experts / van lifers / etc. you're sure to get at least [n+1] different opinions on a subject like this one. In other words, there will always be more opinions than people in the room at the time.
 

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When I pulled up the stock rubber and recycled jean floor, it was soggy and gross.
Ditto. I did it in the winter so it was partially frozen to the van and left little bits I had to remove on a warmer day.
 

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In a room full of [n] Transit owners / Insulation experts / van lifers / etc. you're sure to get at least [n+1] different opinions on a subject like this one. In other words, there will always be more opinions than people in the room at the time.
I apologise for any offence that resulted from the original wording of this comment. I didn't even realize how it could be misunderstood until it was pointed out to me.
 
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I did stock rubber mat, plywood subfloor, felt/plastic underlayment, waterproof vinyl plank. No complaints.
 
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