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Discussion Starter #1
Winnebago has said they would build on the Transit Chassis. Has anyone heard any news about this? I'm not talking class B van conversion, I'm talking the Transit cut-a-way 10360 lb. motorhome chassis.
 

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I can imagine the cutaway becoming a popular base.

It would be great if a pro-Ford builder like Explorer Motorhome would come out with a Fort Transit cut away version of what they did with this 170"WB Sprinter Cutaway. Lots of room inside that streamlined unit.

Thom
 

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Winnebago has said they would build on the Transit Chassis. Has anyone heard any news about this? I'm not talking class B van conversion, I'm talking the Transit cut-a-way 10360 lb. motorhome chassis.

IIRC Ford plans to continue offering the E350/450 cutaway for several more years.
 

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Winnebago has said they would build on the Transit Chassis. Has anyone heard any news about this? I'm not talking class B van conversion, I'm talking the Transit cut-a-way 10360 lb. motorhome chassis.
I expect Winnebago will offer RVs similar to their Trend model as soon as the Transit cutaway chassis is available and they have time to design and develop the model.

With the Transit having dual-rear-wheels and it being rear wheel drive, I expect it will appeal to more traditional buyers than does the FWD ProMaster with SRW.

Also the slightly higher payload will help over the ProMaster. As will the available longer wheelbase also. Just my two cents. I don't see any scenario where Winnebago won't utilize the new Transit cutaway in one form or another. There is too much history suggesting they will to think they will ignore the Transit cutaway in favor of using the Econoline exclusively.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The Transit GCWR is 13500 lbs. The Sprinter is 15250 lbs. even with the 2.1 engine. 1750 lbs. is a lot when building a motorhome.
 

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This week is GNR up at Forest City. Got friends going and I'll see if they can corner someone and ask them about this. (If they'll say)

If they are, and I believe it's coming, I expect we won't see any till this time next year at the earliest....question is, will they be diesel or EcoBoost????
 

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The Transit GCWR is 13500 lbs. The Sprinter is 15250 lbs. even with the 2.1 engine. 1750 lbs. is a lot when building a motorhome.
good point, but what's it vs the PM? I think te point being that is Winnebago went at the PM it seems a no brainer for them go at the Transit...
 

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good point, but what's it vs the PM? I think te point being that is Winnebago went at the PM it seems a no brainer for them go at the Transit...
Exactly, the gasoline ProMaster has a "COMBINED" weight rating of only 11,500 and the diesel (which Winnebago isn't using yet) of 12,500 pounds. Since the T350 Ford Transit cutaway with dual rear wheels is significantly heavier than the PM, its load capacity is about the same. So while a buyer may not gain a lot, they are no worse off. And many traditional US buyers prefer RWD and DRW for any RV.

Mercedes Sprinters do have a much higher COMBINED weight rating, but that only becomes important if towing. And in my experience very few compact Class Cs or B+ tow. I rarely see Sprinter-based RVs towing a toad or a trailer. A few but not many at all.

What seems more important in this context is that Winnebago was willing to build Class B+ RVs decades ago on very light duty Renault and later VW cutaway chassis. RVs similar in size or even bigger than the VW-based Rialta (which was much smaller than the PM-based Trend) can easily be based off a Transit cutaway. And while the market is smaller for compact fuel-efficient RVs, it exists nonetheless.

I personally think Sprinter Class Cs are limited more by high cost than small size, so cheaper Transit and PM models may compete quite well against Sprinters.
 

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The Winnebago LeSharo was based on small FWD diesel van that had well under 100 HP and a relatively low weight rating under 7000 pounds. Obviously most buyers want much bigger RVs just as they did then, but some prefer smaller size along with fuel economy. A diesel Transit compact RV may get around 20 MPG on the highway just like the LeSharo did. I think that would have some appeal at the right price.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/60/Winnebago_Lesharo.JPG
 

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Winnebago has said they would build on the Transit Chassis. Has anyone heard any news about this? I'm not talking class B van conversion, I'm talking the Transit cut-a-way 10360 lb. motorhome chassis.
Report from the friends that are up at the Grand National Rally is don't look for a Transit based Winnebago before late 2015 at the earliest.
The chassis weight capacity is the hold back factor right now.....
 

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Thanks Bob, at 10360lbs GVW, that's 160 lbs more than the first Views and Navions.
They, and anyone else using the Transit, will just have to do some weight saving engineering, minor floor plan changes etc to make the weight.
I had forgotten about the T1N View/Navions GVW being lesser than the NCV3's.....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Winnebago will not sit back and let there competition build a small motorhome on the Transit chassis without competing. Ford has a huge edge when it comes to dealer service. Winnebago also likes the Mercedes star on there motorhomes. They can charge a lot more for there Mercedes chassis RV's, even above and beyond what extra the chassis cost. Winnebago is not telling there customers that the Mercedes chassis is just basically a FedEx van. Winnebago can easily build a slick 23 or 24 foot motorhome on the Transit chassis.
 

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Motorhome Magazine tested the Winnebago Trend at only 8180 pounds wet. Even if Transit cutaway weighs significantly more than the ProMaster chassis, it should still leave adequate cargo carrying capacity. Obviously more CCC would be better.

Compared to View/Navion the Trend is more of a Class B+ design instead of a compact Class C, and it also doesn't have a slide which saves weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I don't think the 10360 lb ford chassis is a problem at all. RVers will think so because they compare the Transit chassis to the Sprinter Chassis. When looking at large motorhomes Winnebago doesn't try to build a 40 footer on all chassis, they build according to gvw. The Vw had a 7200 lb chassis and Winnebago made a neat small RV that was 10% of there business until VW discontinued the chassis.
 

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:) Another question to put on my list for the august transit tour in Seattle. As others have noted i too would expect any of the leading rv manufacturers to jump on the transit. And with today's fuel costs even a smaller/lighter build would make sense.
 

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transit motorhome prospects

I was just in touch with Phoenix Cruiser RV (phoenix Cruiser - Factory Direct from Elkhart, Indiana), which builds factory-direct B+ motorhomes on both the E-series and Sprinter chassis. They do plan to have a Transit-based offering by Spring 2015. But I was told that initially they will be in the 21-foot range because the Transit chassis is not "heavy duty" enough for their larger 24 ft and 30 ft motorhomes (their words). They expect Ford will provide a more heavy-duty Transit chassis in the future, but they also believe that the E-series motorhome chassis will continue until 2020.
 

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Just back from the CA RV show in Pomona. Thor was showing their new 24-foot Compass and Gemini motorhomes, built on the Transit diesel medium wheelbase (156-inch) chassis. Coachmen also debuted their Orion 24-foot motorhome on the same chassis. We are not sure why no-one is building on the longer chassis cab wheelbase (178-inch) that is more comparable to the Sprinter. Maybe it's a supply chain issue and Ford isn't making the longer wheelbase chassis cab available yet to the motorhome manufacturers.
 

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Thanks, I also saw the RV Business article. More good news! Hopefully we'll be able to get a look at the Winnebago offerings at the Good Sam Rally in Phoenix next March. I was not able to tell from the article what wheelbase they are using, only that they are building on the diesel chassis.
 
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