Ford Transit USA Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Gray 2018 15 Passenger Transit 350 XLT - We call it the "Pachyderm"
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am not good with forums so forgive me if there is already a post about this, I tried searching but could not find one.

Anyone have problems with interior pads sticking and wearing out prematurely?

My Transit 350 has 29K miles and the rear brakes were noisy and I noticed a slight drop in fuel mileage. I had it in for an oil change to my usual mechanic who said I needed rear brake pad and calipers because the calipers seized. The inside pads were worn and sticking but the outside were not. Hoping it would be covered under warranty, I took it to the local dealership, not the one I bought from, and they said it was an issue with "slides" that get dirty and don't allow the pads to release property. The service manager said they recommend having the brakes cleaned annually especially in New England where I live. I have had the van a year and this was never mentioned to me. They completed the repair and pad replacement to the tune of $600.00 and told me that it was not covered by the warranty. Feels like I am being taken for a ride here but maybe that is just my natural distrust of dealers, mechanics and people who sell me products I know little about. Any thoughts and if there is already a thread can some one direct me to it?
 

·
Registered
2019 150 mid roof (base)
Joined
·
54 Posts
Most vehicles brake with the front/rear at 60/40%(top of my head haters). I'm pretty sure the transit cargo/passenger vans use more brake percentage in the rear. I believe it's to prevent nose dive. I noticed a lot of info about this when researching before buying.
Brakes are consumables, so not under warranty.
There's a video on GoogleTube about brake replacement. Consider yourself lucky the pads didn't reach metal or you'd be replacing the rotors and the axel must be pulled. $600 would be about $150-$200 if you DIY. You may have dodged a bullet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
My thoughts is that it is not unusual that either the inner or the outer pads wear differently. I’d like them to wear evenly, but often they don’t. I’m not sure what the actual reason for asymmetric wear is. A lot of people quote seized calipers, poorly lubricated caliper slide pins, or the hardware “slides” being dirty. I never really cared what caused it, I’m cleaning it all up anyway. I don’t think it’s a New England thing, I live in Southern California and the same thing occurs here. Every time I change my brake pads (and/or rotors), I relube the pins and either clean or install new hardware “slides”. Since you have to push the calipers back in to make room for new pads, you’re essentially checking for seized calipers at the same time. FWIW, I usually check my pads once a year, with a brake fluid flush every 2-3 years. when in doubt, I err on the side of changing the pads early. Although a lot of people change the rotors at the same time, I usually only change them if there is vibration, too much grooving, or they’ve become too thin For my taste.

therefore, I would think 1) that your first mechanic tried to sell you a new caliper that you didn’t need. 2) the hardware “slides” getting dirty is a true thing 3) cleaning the hardware “slides” yearly seems not cost/time effective for me personally, the hardware “slides” are cheap (around$5-10, and often come free when you buy new pads)... it would take me 30 minutes more to “clean slides to my satisfaction” (remove, brake cleaner, wire brush on a bench grinder, hand wire brush, sand paper, more brake cleaner, reinstall, grease, done) rather than put in new ones (remove old ones, brake cleaner, wire brush, Snap in place, grease , done). 4) ive never heard of brake wear being covered under warranty 5) $600 is certainly a dealership price.

you might have gotten out of it less expensive if you let your first mechanic change the caliper as well as do the brake job, but it’d be close ...

you can it yourself ... certainly brake pads with hardware slides and maybe even rotors are much cheaper than $600. But you’d need to buy yourself a nice floor jack, nice jack stands, wheel chocks, lug nut tool (or impact wrench), some sockets, torx bits, ratchets and wrenches, pry bars, hammer, torque wrench, caliper grease, brake cleaner fluid, factory service manual, and most importantly - time invested in learning to do things to your satisfaction, time to actually do the brake change, and time to go back and fix what you screwed up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
I did the front pads and calipers yearly on my E series vans the Transits uses the rear brakes more than the front so I'll be finding out how often I'll be replacing them. The slides have to be kept greased and dirt isn't good for any part of the brakes.

If you're not familiar with maintenance this is just common no reason why the dealer or Ford should be required to inform you. Don't go to a dealer for normal maintenance,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Just sold mine, only had 40k km on it. The year I owned it the brakes would always feel normal up until right before I come to a complete stop. Felt like the brakes "let go" for half a second then stopped. Never could figure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I have had an issue with right rear calipers going bad and wearing out the pads (only on that side) on several Transits. I have also had a number where the pads went out around 29K, in commercial use. There should be no problems with lubrication failures as those parts are sealed, and if the seal failed it should have been handled under warranty. The dealer had the right to replace the pads and charge you if it was normal wear, but not the calipers and you could contact Ford Customer Service and complain about this to get your money back.
 

·
Registered
Gray 2018 15 Passenger Transit 350 XLT - We call it the "Pachyderm"
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone for your replies. I'll just keep an eye on it and see what the next 29k miles does to the brakes. I am curious to see if it becomes a thing but for know I will move on to bigger and better things.
 

·
Registered
Fleet of 100+ Ford Transits T250 /T350 and Transit Connects 2015 to 2020
Joined
·
1 Posts
I am not good with forums so forgive me if there is already a post about this, I tried searching but could not find one.

Anyone have problems with interior pads sticking and wearing out prematurely?

My Transit 350 has 29K miles and the rear brakes were noisy and I noticed a slight drop in fuel mileage. I had it in for an oil change to my usual mechanic who said I needed rear brake pad and calipers because the calipers seized. The inside pads were worn and sticking but the outside were not. Hoping it would be covered under warranty, I took it to the local dealership, not the one I bought from, and they said it was an issue with "slides" that get dirty and don't allow the pads to release property. The service manager said they recommend having the brakes cleaned annually especially in New England where I live. I have had the van a year and this was never mentioned to me. They completed the repair and pad replacement to the tune of $600.00 and told me that it was not covered by the warranty. Feels like I am being taken for a ride here but maybe that is just my natural distrust of dealers, mechanics and people who sell me products I know little about. Any thoughts and if there is already a thread can some one direct me to it?
That's not uncommon. I manage a fleet of vehicle 300+ with about 100-2015 to 2020 transits, Its like clock work between 28,000 to 35,000 mile we have to replace the rear breaks.
The dealerships charge between 650.00 and 700.00 for rotors & pads. The labor is the issue, because its a floating rear axle, which has to removed in order to replace the rotors.
We service our vans every 7,000 miles using full synthetic oil with a tire rotation and brake inspection to try to limit the replacement of rotors, especially the rear.
Our independent mechanic charges just about $200.00 Less. if you can catch the pads before they are metal to metal, or the rotors have groves in them the cost is less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Not that familiar with Ford OEM parts, but I suggest using them and giving Autozone especially, a wide berth. Always replace hardware. Don’t go cheap on brakes. IRT dealerships, brake work is often given to the entry level guys.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top