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Wow, fears confirmed. Not a single wagon configuration, regardless of engine choice, can tow more than 5100lbs. Unfortunately this eliminates the Transit as an option for me. Bummer, I was really looking forward to this vehicle and was totally pumped to see production start today. Guess I'm going to end up in a Pickup crew cab or a Nissan NV... puke.

2015 Ford Transit | View Towing Specifications | Ford.com
 

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Wow, fears confirmed. Not a single wagon configuration, regardless of engine choice, can tow more than 5100lbs. Unfortunately this eliminates the Transit as an option for me. Bummer, I was really looking forward to this vehicle and was totally pumped to see production start today. Guess I'm going to end up in a Pickup crew cab or a Nissan NV... puke.

2015 Ford Transit | View Towing Specifications | Ford.com
Huh? :s

I already see 4 configurations rated to tow 7000 pounds.

Seven of them are listed at 6900.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Huh? :s

I already see 4 configurations rated to tow 7000 pounds.

Seven of them are listed at 6900.
"Wagon". Look again. Nothing in wagon configuration is over 5100 lbs, and no need to PM me about reading comprehension when you struggle with your own.
 

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What would be the idea towing capacity range for some of you? Just curious and as asked above, what are you guys towing?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What would be the idea towing capacity range for some of you? Just curious and as asked above, what are you guys towing?
I was hoping for at least 7500lbs. I tow a boat and a utility trailer occasionally. It is disappointing to say the least since you cannot even option the wagon with DRW to get to the 7000 lbs rating. Clearly the drivetrain is capable since this same combo can tow 11,300 in the F-150. I can only assume it is frame and/or suspension limited.
 

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Large towing for a large family is an issue. Travel trailers that sleep 6-10 weigh 6-8000 lbs (and more). The large family makes air travel very expensive, and in our case we want a travel trailer to explore with. To carry the family and tow the trailer you need lots of seats, big towing and large payload capacity. Very few vehicles have all three. Nissan's van does all three, the transit appears to only have two. The transit is maddening since they have larger towing capability on the non-wagon versions. Give me the option of seats in a non-wagon version, or toughen up whatever is lacking in the wagon.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Large towing for a large family is an issue. Travel trailers that sleep 6-10 weigh 6-8000 lbs (and more). The large family makes air travel very expensive, and in our case we want a travel trailer to explore with. To carry the family and tow the trailer you need lots of seats, big towing and large payload capacity. Very few vehicles have all three. Nissan's van does all three, the transit appears to only have two. The transit is maddening since they have larger towing capability on the non-wagon versions. Give me the option of seats in a non-wagon version, or toughen up whatever is lacking in the wagon.
x2

Give me 8 seats DRW for the 7000 tow rating, and a cargo area and I'll put down a deposit. Since that's not happening, I'm going to have to sacrifice looks (and efficiency) in a Nissan Van, or sacrifice cargo capacity and $$ in an Expedition.

I can't tell you how disappointed that makes me:mad:
 

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"Wagon". Look again. Nothing in wagon configuration is over 5100 lbs, and no need to PM me about reading comprehension when you struggle with your own.
I don't get this.

I wasn't trying to insult you or anything. Just trying to point out something you might have missed.

Sorry. My mistake...

As for the tow rating, maybe you could get one of the cargo versions outfitted as an 8-passenger conversion van?
 

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I was hoping for at least 7500lbs. I tow a boat and a utility trailer occasionally. It is disappointing to say the least since you cannot even option the wagon with DRW to get to the 7000 lbs rating. Clearly the drivetrain is capable since this same combo can tow 11,300 in the F-150. I can only assume it is frame and/or suspension limited.
Not bad, thats a good amount to tow.
I also believe that the suspension and frame will make a difference, after all you dont want to tow too much to a point you're about to damage not just the engine but the frame.
 

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These tow ratings seem limited mostly by Gross Combined Weight Rating for any given drivetrain combination. If we take one of these vans and add significant weight by either doing a passenger, travel, or camper conversion, or by adding passengers, then the towing capacity will be much lower than listed.

These towing specs are maximum which may not apply depending on application.
 

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I was hoping for at least 7500lbs. I tow a boat and a utility trailer occasionally. It is disappointing to say the least since you cannot even option the wagon with DRW to get to the 7000 lbs rating. Clearly the drivetrain is capable since this same combo can tow 11,300 in the F-150. I can only assume it is frame and/or suspension limited.
I suspect this is a limitation of GVWR, not powertrain.

Are all the vehicles you are comparing using the new SAE towing specs? Manufacturers played major shenanigans in the past, while Ford had a towing guide that gave ratings based not only on weight but also frontal area, load-leveling hitch, and powertrain.
 

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It doesn't really matter what buyers want to tow, this van is/was touted as a replacement for the e-series van which could be configured to tow 10,000lbs even in 15 passenger form.
http://www.fleet.ford.com/resources/ford/general/pdf/towingguides/13FLRVTTgde_Oct19.pdf

If the transit can't be configured to do the same then it is not a replacement for buyers looking to do so.
That said I expected this when I heard the transit was a unit body construction and not body on frame.
 

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No one vehicle can do everything well. Competing interests require compromise.

I expect very few Econoline drivers tow 10,000 pound trailers. Many rarely tow at all. I also expect Ford determined that factors like fuel economy, ride quality, low noise, and so on were more important to buyers than limiting performance just so towing was higher.

For towing the Transit clearly doesn't replace the Econoline at the upper end, but in many other areas the Transit may far exceed Econoline performance standards.

For what it's worth, I don't buy into theory that unitized construction must limit tow rating. Older GM and Dodge vans that had similar construction had higher tow ratings. I think it's more about trying to keep weight and costs down on Transit that leads to lower tow ratings.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Okay, so I am en engineer, but not an automotive engineer. I need some perspective here from anyone with actual applied knowledge (no guessing please).

The 150 shorty with ecoboost and 3.73 rear end in a VAN is listed as 12800 GCWR and has a 7300 lbs tow rating. This is with a single wheel rear axle.

The 150 shorty with ecoboost and 3.73 rear end in a WAGON is listed as 11200 GCWR and has a 5100 lbs tow rating. Also with a single wheel rear axle.

What gives? Obviously the rear end and axle are the same, as is the body/frame. The ONLY thing I can come up with is that they have softer springs on the Wagon to give it a more compliant ride and those softer springs aren't up to snuff for a higher GCWR... Can anyone give me a better explanation for the discrepancy, because I'm not saying I would ever do this 0:) , but if the springs are the limiting factor, aftermarket helpers and/or air bags could enable a higher tow rating for the WAGON.
 

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Part of the reason is that the van is a unibody vehicle, and compared to the old Econoline body-on-frame construction (which was sacrificed for fuel economy), it tows significantly less.
 

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Part of the reason is that the van is a unibody vehicle, and compared to the old Econoline body-on-frame construction (which was sacrificed for fuel economy), it tows significantly less.
I don't know if it has been said but the seats weigh over 100lbs and I think they are allowing 100lbs for a person in each seat. Hence the difference between the 150 van at 5900 lbs tow capacity and 5100 for wagon. I tow a 4400lb travel trailer with an E150 wagon 3:73 rear end rated at 5600lb tow capacity. I have no idea how much stuff we put in it but the 4.6L does the job. My guess is the steel structure on the 150 van and wagon are the same it would not be cost effective to have different structures. But it's possible the suspension is different.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It's the same vehicle folks. I'm not comparing the transit to the e series. I'm comparing the van vs wagon transit 150 shorty with the exact same drivetrain.

I could buy the interior finishes weight bit if the GCWR was the same, but it's not. The gross combined vehicle restriction is less for the wagon, and that is exclusive of payload... In other words, it doesn't matter the empty weight of a wagon vs van, the total combined weight of the vehicle (with or without seats) and trailer are limited to 1800 lbs less on the wagon. Explain.
 
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