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can I copyright #hobolife or Sneaky Old Man Living In A Van?

Shoot, hobolife is already in circulation, there is even a hobo life simulation game (not sure if includes "stealth camping" van)
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Oh, don't worry. The campground types would be concerned about "off roading" their vans on the dirt roads, and wouldn't venture onto a dirt road unless they had done $20k in off-pavementing modifications, including tires that rub when going over bumps.
馃槅馃槅馃槅馃槅馃槅馃槅馃槅馃槅馃槅馃槅
 

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can I copyright #hobolife or Sneaky Old Man Living In A Van?

Shoot, hobolife is already in circulation, there is even a hobo life simulation game (not sure if includes "stealth camping" van)
"rubbertramp" is another popular term. I would not Google it though.
 

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Many years ago I used to go to a hot spring that was in the middle of nowhere and hard to find. The folks I met there were always nice and respectful of the place. Then FWD magazine published the coordinates and directions on how to find it. Instantly the place was full of trash, piles of feces, loud music and jerks.When something is easy, people do not attach value to it. Making it easier for the clueless to get "out there" is doing a disservice to "out there".

Out in the desert once (anyone know Lipincott road?) I rescued two very nice, very clueless people in a rental car. The had rented the car and tried to get out to The Racetrack via Lippincott road. It clearly has a sign saying FWD drive only, no tow service. Pretty tough road, at least by my standards. They had ignored that and had gotten stuck and busted something on the car. They had no water or food, just two beers. We found them trying to walk out in the middle of the day. We let their people know they were OK via radio, put them up for the night and drove them out in the morning. I'd say a car passes through there every couple or few weeks. I feel sure if we didn't happen along the vultures would have been picking their bones. I always wondered what happened to the car, no tow truck is going out there. I'm guessing it got shoved off the road and is still there. Look at how they had to airlift out the "Into the Wild" bus because idiots kept getting killed trying to get there.

I'm not saying we shouldn't help beginners. We all were at one time and I sure still have a lot to learn and have benefited greatly from these and other forums as well as folks out there in the real world. I have always done my best to pay that forward and help others as well. I don't want "out there" to belong to some elitist club. But somehow folks need to do some work and show some initiative themselves.

As noted, most of the clueless don't want to go on dirt roads and have no idea what dispersed camping is. I am terrified that they will find out how awesome true boondocking is though. Now that I am too old to hike my way from the masses I am limited to where I can drive to. If I can drive there, so can at least some of the clueless. As it is now, when I meet someone "out there" most likely they are cool, capable folks.
 

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#vanlife is a sick perversion.
I have consulted my crystal ball, and it will go the way of #tinyhome within a year or two.
Neophytes who were inspired by fantastic blogs and glamour pics from #vanlife photoshoots will rapidly discover that being in a van for more than a week or two at a time is a miserable, limiting existence requiring huge compromises.

#vanlife is a lifestyle best left to vagabonds, the income-challenged, serial killers, hobos, and perpetual outdoor enthusiasts (no job, home, or obligations; all time spent rock climbing, mountain biking, kayaking, etc).

And what kind of fool stays in campgrounds?! OMG, they are even worse than the worst, most crowded, noisey neighborhood in any city. "Dispersed camping" on BLM and NFS is the only way to go. If you can see or hear any other campers, you're too close together.
Totally agree!!
I discovered the problems with campgrounds a long time ago, when I had barely reached adulthood. Exactly --- I found the situations in many of them to be noisier than anything I'd experienced in urban city life. Not always ... some campgrounds in less popular areas were very quiet, with only real outdoors enthusiasts there. But it was unpredictable, and one could just as well end up next to an RV with its generator roaring for hours, or a camper with TV and stereo/radio blaring, or a family with screaming children or a big loud party. I had to leave more than one campground site, after all the trouble of setting up, due to the grating noise.
I learned about boondocking in my early 20's and have never looked back.
In my early years I boondocked in a Honda Accord Hatchback, sometimes with a tent set up. Later I boondocked in a small Toyota pickup truck with a homemade wooden camper. Now it's Ford Transit van boondocking, a lotmore comfortable, if a bit less manueverable due to the larger vehicle size.
I very rarely find a boondocking site that is picture-perfect, with a magnificent scenic view and amenities that would encourage one to stay a long time. Rather, what I find are simply out of the way spots, often quite unimpressive, often very close to the main road through the area, to simply spend the night relatively quietly before moving on to do what you're really here for, which are outdoor activities like hiking, biking, kayaking. If people are getting the impression that there are a ton of really lovely spots by a lake or river or mountaintop to boondock, they are misled. Some of the nicest spots are doubtless those found only via 4-wheel drive road, and thus you'd need a 4WD vehicle to access them, as well as 4WD driving skills.

My article about my van conversion and early boondocking experiences:

 

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Many years ago I used to go to a hot spring that was in the middle of nowhere and hard to find. The folks I met there were always nice and respectful of the place. Then FWD magazine published the coordinates and directions on how to find it. Instantly the place was full of trash, piles of feces, loud music and jerks.When something is easy, people do not attach value to it. Making it easier for the clueless to get "out there" is doing a disservice to "out there".

Out in the desert once (anyone know Lipincott road?) I rescued two very nice, very clueless people in a rental car. The had rented the car and tried to get out to The Racetrack via Lippincott road. It clearly has a sign saying FWD drive only, no tow service. Pretty tough road, at least by my standards. They had ignored that and had gotten stuck and busted something on the car. They had no water or food, just two beers. We found them trying to walk out in the middle of the day. We let their people know they were OK via radio, put them up for the night and drove them out in the morning. I'd say a car passes through there every couple or few weeks. I feel sure if we didn't happen along the vultures would have been picking their bones. I always wondered what happened to the car, no tow truck is going out there. I'm guessing it got shoved off the road and is still there. Look at how they had to airlift out the "Into the Wild" bus because idiots kept getting killed trying to get there.

I'm not saying we shouldn't help beginners. We all were at one time and I sure still have a lot to learn and have benefited greatly from these and other forums as well as folks out there in the real world. I have always done my best to pay that forward and help others as well. I don't want "out there" to belong to some elitist club. But somehow folks need to do some work and show some initiative themselves.

As noted, most of the clueless don't want to go on dirt roads and have no idea what dispersed camping is. I am terrified that they will find out how awesome true boondocking is though. Now that I am too old to hike my way from the masses I am limited to where I can drive to. If I can drive there, so can at least some of the clueless. As it is now, when I meet someone "out there" most likely they are cool, capable folks.
I agree about the sad fate meeting spots that get popularized. I used to hike and backpack on California's Lost Coast, and then it began to be popularized and now as I understand it, you can't backpack there without a permit, because too many people are heading out there.
There have been several stories about people traveling out sightseeing on lonely dirt roads and not having the wisdom to turn around when the road got rough. The tale of the "Death Valley Germans" was one of the more sensational stories: https://www.strangeoutdoors.com/mysterious-stories-blog/2017/11/18/germantouristindeathvalley and I enjoyed this tale by the man who found the remains of these folks: The Hunt for the Death Valley Germans . Then there were the Stolpas, who got stuck in remote Nevada when they made the mistake to take a little traveled dirt road in a snowstorm. Family Rescued After Being Lost in Snow for a Week : Storm: Soldier walks for help after leaving his wife and baby in a cave. All three are in good condition.


Many young urban people are estranged from nature. They don't have a sense of the dangers in nature, as they've grown up in a time when families and the government have over-nannied people. The many deaths that occur just from people trying to do selfies, eg hanging over cliff edges, are sad evidence of this. They're used to pushing buttons to solve problems immediately. The concept of being lost or stuck in the wilderness without cell reception or anyone to help is rather beyond them.
I have been scared off a sufficient number of rough dirt roads, that I prefer not to travel very far down roads that show signs of not being often traveled, and even better, prefer to check with locals on road conditions before venturing out.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Many years ago I used to go to a hot spring that was in the middle of nowhere and hard to find. The folks I met there were always nice and respectful of the place. Then FWD magazine published the coordinates and directions on how to find it. Instantly the place was full of trash, piles of feces, loud music and jerks.When something is easy, people do not attach value to it. Making it easier for the clueless to get "out there" is doing a disservice to "out there".
It seems to happen everywhere. A friend of mine has a cabin just outside of Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta. A paved road leads from the main highway to the US border. The road is well used in the summer but after September signs go up that indicate that the road is not maintained and the border is closed. After January 1 more signs go up and they block part of the road so you have to drive around the roadblock to continue. My friend went to his cabin one February, it was getting down to the -30's at night and he had to use his big 4x to even get up the paved road safetley to his driveway, past his driveway he would not even try it as the road got steeper and there was more snow the higher you went. He was there two days when one night he went outside and heard a strange noise. He looked towards the noise which was up higher on the highway and saw some lights where there shouldn't be lights. He got in his truck and drove down to the highway and looked up the highway and saw taillights. He drove up and stopped a ways back then walked to the car. He found a guy sitting in the car with a death grip on the steering wheel and his foot on the gas. Problem was the two feet of snow the car had drove into that was across the road. He knocked on the drivers window and the guy jumped, without taking his foot off the gas and using only one hand because he had to keep one hand on the steering wheel he powered the window down. My friend had to convince this guy to take his foot off the gas so he could talk to him. Finally the driver did and my friend asked him what he was doing (seeing his car was stuck and had been for a while) and the driver said he was driving to the border. He asked the driver if he did not see the signs saying road closed or that the border was closed or notice that the road was blocked off or the snow on the road and the guy said "NO"! Then he tried to continue. It took my friend a long time to convince the guy to stop then got him turned around and heading back down the mountain to the highway.

Where he was wasn't that far from civilization (5k from the nearest house) but in -30 and without a grasp on what was happening this guy was dead if he had not been found.

You have to wonder how some people make it in life!
 

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Now you guys are reminding me to be-moan the loss of the spot I found off UT 313. A large alcove, small canyon, in the mesa complete with Anasazi ruins, petroglyphs, trees. Some other yahoos found it later in the 90's, trashed it, and the roads are now blocked with boulders and NO CAMPING signs posted everywhere. Most of my other "secret" campsites are still intact; I check freecampsites.net every once in a while to make sure no one's posted them.
 

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Many young urban people are estranged from nature.

Good. Maybe they'll stay away.

Park ranger buddy complains loudly, with bad words, about the "Let's take city kids to the national parks" programs. The amount of vandalism, destruction and litter from just 2hrs of them walking around is unbelievable. His park, which is famous and will be unmentioned, had over $100k in damage to historic structures from one of those trips. Not that they had to spend $100k, but that's what it would have cost for the repair and restoration if they had the funding.

Maybe 1-2 kids on that trip got the bug and want to dive into nature and history, but the other 30 just discovered an open canvas for their urban blight. Even some of the parent chaperones were tagging stuff with magic markers!

Another friend who is a State Park LE Ranger has many fish out of water tales of urbanized people in the woods. Did you know that picnic tables are NOT firewood? Some don't.
 

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Now you guys are reminding me to be-moan the loss of the spot I found off UT 313. A large alcove, small canyon, in the mesa complete with Anasazi ruins, petroglyphs, trees. Some other yahoos found it later in the 90's, trashed it, and the roads are now blocked with boulders and NO CAMPING signs posted everywhere. Most of my other "secret" campsites are still intact; I check freecampsites.net every once in a while to make sure no one's posted them.
Yep, I believe in not sharing secrets with the masses. Those who spend enough time exploring, will find great places on their own. You have to put in the work, to find these spots.
 

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Good. Maybe they'll stay away.

Park ranger buddy complains loudly, with bad words, about the "Let's take city kids to the national parks" programs. The amount of vandalism, destruction and litter from just 2hrs of them walking around is unbelievable. His park, which is famous and will be unmentioned, had over $100k in damage to historic structures from one of those trips. Not that they had to spend $100k, but that's what it would have cost for the repair and restoration if they had the funding.

Maybe 1-2 kids on that trip got the bug and want to dive into nature and history, but the other 30 just discovered an open canvas for their urban blight. Even some of the parent chaperones were tagging stuff with magic markers!

Another friend who is a State Park LE Ranger has many fish out of water tales of urbanized people in the woods. Did you know that picnic tables are NOT firewood? Some don't.
It's horrendous. I can't run in the other direction fast enough when I hear these people coming. And you can always hear them coming because they can't shut up for a minute.
My position would be: city kids don't earn the right to go visit national parks until they demonstrate they can be respectful.

It's not just the city kids but even the young folks with college educations, who think they're cool and knowledgeable, who are often surprisingly uninformed about what it means to explore in nature.
 

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I'm sure previous generations thought we were all delicate flowers, because we didn't just take a knapsack and (make) a hiking stick and head off into the woods. And their ancestors are like "we put everything we had into a small wagon and went on a several month trip for just the possibility of maybe having something good at the end, and 20% of us died doing it, and here you just step onto a train with your fancy, clean shoes and BAM! you're in New York City!".
 

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Now you guys are reminding me to be-moan the loss of the spot I found off UT 313. A large alcove, small canyon, in the mesa complete with Anasazi ruins, petroglyphs, trees. Some other yahoos found it later in the 90's, trashed it, and the roads are now blocked with boulders and NO CAMPING signs posted everywhere. Most of my other "secret" campsites are still intact; I check freecampsites.net every once in a while to make sure no one's posted them.
Simply astounding that arseholes will mess with ancient sites. You'd think that even an idiot would appreciate the importance of such places and feel the awe that the rest of us do.

Just a quick story: In a car in the desert, getting late and the wind blowing like crazy, sandblasting the car. Saw a rock a couple hundred yards from the road and it was the closest thing there was to shelter. Huddled up on the leeward side until morning with a tee shirt over my face. When dawn came the wind had died down and we saw that the rock was covered in petroglyphs. We were doing exactly the same thing that the ancients were doing, looking for a little shelter in a harsh environment. One of the best memories of my whole life.
 

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Now you guys are reminding me to be-moan the loss of the spot I found off UT 313. A large alcove, small canyon, in the mesa complete with Anasazi ruins, petroglyphs, trees. Some other yahoos found it later in the 90's, trashed it, and the roads are now blocked with boulders and NO CAMPING signs posted everywhere. Most of my other "secret" campsites are still intact; I check freecampsites.net every once in a while to make sure no one's posted them.
The 90's were tough on dispersed camp sights. The Forest Service was being criticized for not limiting logging and they responded by blocking access to a lot of decent dispersed sites. I complained to my beer a lot back then. Since then though, seeing what modern transportation has done to getting the clueless out into nature, I have decided that it's probably best for the environment. In the early 2000's I once was camped in an established dispersed site on the North Santiam River, walked down the road a ways to the next spot and it was littered with trash. I loaded two garbage bags with sopping wet "disposable" diapers from that site. The bags were so heavy I could just barely lug them out to the road. Just one reason why I always carry garbage bags and disposable gloves in the vehicle.

Anymore, I don't think too much about camping and just look for a place to quietly sleep at night before moving on. That's why I got rid of the pickup and camper and went back to a van. Much easier to blend in overnight. I am so glad that I had the remote camping experiences from 30-40 years ago. And can still remember them!

On the other end of the dispersed camping story, I was in an established NFS campground one time and watched a couple jockey their 40 foot motorhome into the next site over. After they spent almost an hour getting their ranch style home on wheels squeezed into the site, the woman walks over to our site and asked if they can have our firewood? I told her that if we can use their hottub, I would share the firewood. I'll never forget the blank look on her face and long internal dialogue pause before she turned around and went back to their rig. Classic.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
The bears are coming!!!!! Another big #vanlife #tinyhome #bus #buslife #RV #camping questions is how do I protect myself from the wild animals that are waiting to devour my food and maybe me??? This video will give you real life suggestions on how to protect yourself from all the creatures that are lying in wait at every turn in the wilderness.

https://youtu.be/2zv3SS2Fksw
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Driving a van is different then driving a small car, this video I talk about some of the differences.

 
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Discussion Starter #57
What to do about food in the van.

 

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Discussion Starter #58
How I handle vanlife in the cold weather.


 

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Discussion Starter #59
Rethinking of my video series. When I initially thought of a quick series about real van life / bus life / tiny home life I never thought it would include so much.

 

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Discussion Starter #60
Why I chose the ban I did.
 
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