Ford Transit USA Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently bought a 2018 Transit 150 passenger, short WB, low roof.

It has the stock Conti tires on, so I ordered a set of Falken Wildpeak AT3W 255/70 r16 tires, and they came in yesterday.

After looking at the sticker in the door-jamb, the store said that they could not install them (for legal reasons), as they are a Load Range C tire (50 psi max), and the decal calls for a Load Range E (80 psi). Crap!

I’ve discovered that the BFG KO2s are “E” rated, and am willing to go that route if I really have to, but I can’t seem to get clarity on the whole Load Range thing. I will never be carrying heavy loads, and as a matter of fact have even removed the rear seats for my particular super-light usage.

So am I OK to use the C rated Wildpeaks, or do I really need to have E rated tires on this van? The decal says 52 psi for the front, and 71 psi for the rear, but isn’t that when fully loaded to the max, or is that what they should be inflated to for normal driving as well, without any load?

BTW, the store said that they would only install them if I brought them the wheels without the van, and I bolt them on myself at home.

It’s all quite confusing, and would appreciate some assistance.



Load Ranges:

B = 35 PSI
C = 50 PSI
D = 65 PSI
E = 80 PSI
 

·
Registered
2017 T-250-MR-148-3.5-ARB AIR-LOCKER REAR
Joined
·
145 Posts
Installing load range C tires would create an unsafe condition that may lead to a bad accident. Think about having a front tire blow-out because of being overloaded.

Will you insurance company cover an accident caused by under-rated tires that you installed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Does Ford really want us to have the tires inflated to these numbers (50 front and 70 rear) when completely empty? Seems like that would provide for an awfully harsh ride no?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
Technically and realistically, you could use tires with a lower load capacity, a lot of towny Transit drivers use SUV/Light Truck tires, I guess because they're cheaper (forget about the psi, the "C,E" letters and just look at the max pound capacity). However, as stated above, your insurance company could refuse to pay any claims if they discover you weren't using the manufacturer recommended type tires; even if the tires had nothing to do with the accident.

50/70 sounds mushy to me, I run 65/75 without much of a load. Mainly for MPG and tire wear (Conti's on the front are wearing the outer edges FAST).

The Transit is designed from the ground up to be a Light Commercial Truck, aka "delivery van". It was not designed for passengers or daily personal driving, although it can be used for those things. A Transit Wagon is just a delivery van with seats installed at the factory, aka commuter shuttle (with a few comforts like rear AC and rear sway bar). For people interested in driving/riding comfort, I'd recommend buying a large SUV instead of a delivery van. Despite it's commercial truck design, the Transit is acceptable for many people as a passenger vehicle or daily driver. It's my only vehicle right now. It drives and rides like a truck, because it's, well, you know.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nvydvrdude

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies so far. OK, so I am prepared to go with a Load Range E (10 ply) tire, but I am hearing conflicting reports of fit on the Transit. Some say that the 245/75 r16 (30.4" dia) will require some trimming on the front plastic and pinch-weld, and some say that it doesn't, and then some say that the 255/70 r16 (30" dia) will fit, but others say that it will rub on the strut. Does someone have clarity on that, or does it simply depend on the brand of tire?

Also, is there a Load Range E tire in these two sizes other than the BFG KO2?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
Luckily, someone made a thread that collected user experiences, and lists the tires by size for the stock size rims. The LAST post is the most current info.
(note: that thread is not for extended discussion and opinion, it's for cut-and-dry info regarding tire fitment)

 
  • Like
Reactions: asdrew

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,471 Posts
Also, is there a Load Range E tire in these two sizes other than the BFG KO2?
Yes, there are a variety of them. The most common larger size discussed is 245/75 16, which I have. Most have no rubbing issues, the Coopers on ours will scuff slightly when hitting a bump at full lock which does not happen often enough to worry about.

On most tire retailer sites you can input the desired tire size directly and then select the load rating to view the offerings. If you put in vehicle information, they will only suggest factory tire replacements, so go by size instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, there are a variety of them. The most common larger size discussed is 245/75 16, which I have. Most have no rubbing issues, the Coopers on ours will scuff slightly when hitting a bump at full lock which does not happen often enough to worry about.
Thanks. That's interesting, because everything I've read states that the 245/75 r16 definitely requires some trimming on the front plastic, as well as the pinch weld. (?)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,471 Posts
Thanks. That's interesting, because everything I've read states that the 245/75 r16 definitely requires some trimming on the front plastic, as well as the pinch weld. (?)
Read some more, or do some trimming. mine are fine as are many others. The more aggressive treads like the BFGs tend to need trimming more than others. The thread that @surly Bill started and referenced above has great information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
BTW, the store said that they would only install them if I brought them the wheels without the van, and I bolt them on myself at home.

It’s all quite confusing, and would appreciate some assistance.
it’s not that confusing at all. It’s about legally protecting your company.

If they install the tires on the wheels and put them on your van, and you have a blowout and kill yourself, after an investigation of what caused the blowout, they’ll be sued by your family members and any other injured people for installing tires not safely rated for the van.

on the other hand, if they put the tires on the wheels “without any knowledge“ of what vehicle you have ... and you install them onto your van and have a blowout and die, then they can say “not our fault, we didn’t know”, and any injured people can sue you instead.
 
  • Like
Reactions: surly Bill

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It’s not that confusing at all. It’s about legally protecting your company.

If they install the tires on the wheels and put them on your van, and you have a blowout and kill yourself, after an investigation of what caused the blowout, they’ll be sued by your family members and any other injured people for installing tires not safely rated for the van.

On the other hand, if they put the tires on the wheels “without any knowledge“ of what vehicle you have ... and you install them onto your van and have a blowout and die, then they can say “not our fault, we didn’t know”, and any injured people can sue you instead.
Yes, I fully understand that part of it all, I was just unaware of the load ratings and how this Transit requires the 10-ply Load Range E tires when I've seen many things online where guys have put Load Range C tires on their Transits; so much so that I had gone ahead and ordered the Falken Wildpeaks, not knowing all of this. Perhaps those using the lighter duty tires are not aware of the requirements.

Example:



My supplier is now seeing if they can find some KO2 255/70 r16s.

.
 

·
Administrator
2018 T350HD Dual Sliders - SOLD
Joined
·
2,565 Posts


D'OH! I knew that. Did I mention I got Covid tested today? They inserted a long Q tip into my left nostril, and they just kept going deeper and deeper until I started wondering what orifice they were going to come out of. There is no way that you can slide something that long into my head without it coming out an existing hole or a new one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
D'OH! I knew that. Did I mention I got Covid tested today? They inserted a long Q tip into my left nostril, and they just kept going deeper and deeper until I started wondering what orifice they were going to come out of. There is no way that you can slide something that long into my head without it coming out an existing hole or a new one.
I had the new-fangled test about a month ago, it was just a regular length medical q-tip swirled around inside my nose. Came back negative about 10 days later, which I question because I was so sick I couldn't get out of bed for a couple days and had many of the symptoms; it really couldn't have been anything else. I got the test several days after I recovered, so I was probably "virus free". Now that same free testing place offers an antibody test (blood draw), so I might go back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
Back to the issue of tire pressure,

As others have said, tires are constructed with a design load range. The higher the load range the stiffer the sidewalls, the higher the tire pressure for a given load and the stiffer the ride.

Not many people do it, but I have seen recommendations to weigh the vehicle when fully loaded using individual scales under each tire. Then apply the tire manufacturers recommended tire pressure for that weight. Most will provide a tire pressure chart. It is possible that each tire would have a different tire pressure if the loads at each wheel are significantly different. The correct tire pressure is calculated to shape the tread correctly to maximize the contact patch on the road. See the image above Re; under inflated, over inflated or correctly inflated.
 

·
Registered
2017 T-250-MR-148-3.5-ARB AIR-LOCKER REAR
Joined
·
145 Posts
Thanks. That's interesting, because everything I've read states that the 245/75 r16 definitely requires some trimming on the front plastic, as well as the pinch weld. (?)
RV-Airakula Pinch Weld Mods:
Thanks. That's interesting, because everything I've read states that the 245/75 r16 definitely requires some trimming on the front plastic, as well as the pinch weld. (?)
Thanks. That's interesting, because everything I've read states that the 245/75 r16 definitely requires some trimming on the front plastic, as well as the pinch weld. (?)
Thanks. That's interesting, because everything I've read states that the 245/75 r16 definitely requires some trimming on the front plastic, as well as the pinch weld. (?)
RV-Airakula Pinch Weld Mods:

OEM Pinch Weld driver side front
137725


First, Flatten Edge
137726


Second, Start Bend
137727


Third, Finish Bend with BFG (Big .... Hammer)
Pic of passenger side with LT265/75/17 (31.7" O.D.) used for test fit only.
I installed LT245/70/17 (30.5" O.D.) to provide more clearance between a tire spinning at freeway speeds and metal body parts.
137728


Last, Check for interference with Cooling System cross-body support and trim as needed.
Pic of 31.7 O.D. tire x 10.6" wide on OEM wheel.
137731


Paint all metal edges cut and or bent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
Yes, I fully understand that part of it all, I was just unaware of the load ratings and how this Transit requires the 10-ply Load Range E tires when I've seen many things online where guys have put Load Range C tires on their Transits; so much so that I had gone ahead and ordered the Falken Wildpeaks, not knowing all of this. Perhaps those using the lighter duty tires are not aware of the requirements.

Example:



My supplier is now seeing if they can find some KO2 255/70 r16s.

.
Do not use the letter E and C as the determination for load rating, I have C rated tires on mine and they have a higher load rating than the same tire in a LT E 10 ply.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top