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They used to be here.
Though never doing the volumes/variety that the world (or the US) consumes today.

The US has long been trying to get chip manufacturers back to the US for national security reasons, and it has resulted in some fab coming back. Maybe the supply chain disruptions will give it an extra push and my kids will be able to benefit from it when they're grown.
 

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Me thinks that national security and the legacy chip used in automobiles are two different issues when it comes to semiconductor manufacture. Unfortunately the loss of technical capabilities are not just in the semiconductor industry. Isolationist thinking without first restoring/upgrading a broad swath of our capabilities might not be such a good idea. Of course that might require Gov't involvement ...
 

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It's a great idea to have some chip mfg in Merikuh, but be prepared to pay Made In Merikuh prices for them. Labor and regulations are a lot more expensive here, which is why companies moved their mfg to other countries. And of course there would be the QC issues with Made In Merikuh, too. I'm not poo-pooing the idea, I think it would be beneficial, but there's a reason why almost everything we buy is made in other countries, and it's not a conspiracy. The cost of making stuff in Merikuh will be passed on to the consumer.
 

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Sometimes I think that technology is screwing the world up and we'd be better without chips
but then again were probably better off with chips for farm tractors to tend to the fields.
Personally I believe that they should ban cars from the general public and Truckers the only ones allowed to drive .
The general population could ride bicycles and scooters like in some of those asian countries , much more social and more physical fitness.
It seems batteries will be pretty important in the future , electric motors are pretty simple but are scientists should be working on upping there battery game instead of depending on China.
 

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We do have a government that is determined to eliminate any manufacturing in this country.

I am surprised at this because eventually that will eliminate all the government jobs that have been created to harass businesses. One would think the government should be smart enough to maintain more voting government employees. :)
 

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In 2019 there was a spending bill passed that allocated around 50 billion dollars to bolster chip manufacturing capabilites in the US. One chip mfg company "Global Foundries" a few years ago moved their HQ from Arizona to a new facility they built in upstate NY. With some of the 2019 money they recieved, they are doubling the size of their facility to increase production.
The "chip shortage" is an issue that the industry has forseen for about a decade, as we put them in EVERYTHING. From doorbells to shoe insoles and everything in between. The pandemic just exacerbated the problem and the supply chain failed. But with other companies also expanding their manufacturing capabilities like Global Foundries eventually the US will have firm grip on the market.

Also these expansions mean jobs. I mean really good paying jobs to build up these facilities, and more jobs to run them.
 

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I grew up in Palo Alto, Ca. In the 50’s. A friend of mine worked at a company called Advalloy where the first (i believe) chips were made for Fairchild Semiconductor (now Intel). He always talked about the chemicals and the hazards. The site has a plaque and is also a superfund site.
Back in the 90’s I think, another friend was involved in the design of mass memory storage systems. He continually fought to stop the company from the research production and final production from being done overseas. His reasoning was cost, travel time and the designs would be stolen.
A client of mine owned a precision machine shop in Santa Clara that made the prototype parts for AMD for the machines to make their chips. Those were machines were copied and a new factory was set up in China which was copied in a different town for future production.

We have put ourselves not only at a cost of production disadvantage but also a technical one. I wish us luck but with all the special interest activists (some justified), the labor costs, and other constraints on businesses, I don’t have much hope.
 

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A reminder, the chips used in automobiles are different (antique) size and mfg than the modern chips used in everything else from cell phones to talking toys. That's one thing contributing to the car chip shortage; mfg's don't want to make them because they can make 3-4x as many chips in the modern size standards with the same amount of materials and labor.

One thing that would help would be to standardize vehicle and computer interface to allow whatever new chip size that comes along to be used; with an adapter if needed.

I like Mobile's idea of a vehicle without a computer, but at this point it's impractical given all the sensors and drive-by-wire controls and things. And although I grok his idea of no personal ownership of cars, I laugh at the ruckus and random explosive violence that it would create with a certain troubled minority of the population that would claim it was "against the Constitution". I am seriously looking into getting another 60's or 70's car with all mechanical workings; both as a project and for practical reasons like solar flares and EMPs. I completely forgot about Opel GTs until yesterday, and someone has a Saab Sonnet for sale cheap not too far away. Drop a Toyota 22r into either and you have a snazzy ride! Or maybe the tried and true VW Bug platform, a Baja Bug would be pretty utilitarian and easy to work on. I know that few people have the ability or time to tinker with an old car, so going this route is not a solution to the national problem of chip and other parts shortages.

I do see a not too distant future with autonomous vehicles acting as Lyft/Uber in cities, making it much more affordable to NOT own a personal car, and living as if you DO have a personal car (actually probably better, because you won't have to walk 10 blocks to where you found parking). A bunch of cars parked on the street not doing anything is wasteful, a bunch of autonomous vehicles for hire carrying passengers and stuff and only parking to recharge of for maintenance will reduce the number of vehicles in a city 10-fold. Ruralites: this doesn't apply to you, so please don't give examples of how it would take forever to get a cab to come to your farm in the middle of nowhere and haul a pair of new Llamas you bought back home. Or how you can't go on 2500 mile roadtrips in an EV autonomous cab. Autonomous cabs are only practical for major urban areas, just like cab service was only practical in cities for the last 100 years.
Motor vehicle Vehicle Mode of transport Automotive exterior Vehicle door



But yeah, I think shortages of all kinds of parts will continue for at least another year. I feel sorry for people that have ordered a custom configuration van or car. Trying to lure some mfg back into Merikuh may help, but I think it's going to be yet another excuse for companies to raise the cost of their finished products well beyond what it ACTUALLY increased their production cost. Cuz, profits are good for the people that profit from them. Is that a Ferengi Rule of Acquisition? It should be.
 

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I like Mobile's idea of a vehicle without a computer, but at this point it's impractical given all the sensors and drive-by-wire controls and things. And although I grok his idea of no personal ownership of cars, I laugh at the ruckus and random explosive violence that it would create with a certain troubled minority of the population that would claim it was "against the Constitution". I am seriously looking into getting another 60's or 70's car with all mechanical workings; both as a project and for practical reasons like solar flares and EMPs. I completely forgot about Opel GTs until yesterday, and someone has a Saab Sonnet for sale cheap not too far away. Drop a Toyota 22r into either and you have a snazzy ride! Or maybe the tried and true VW Bug platform, a Baja Bug would be pretty utilitarian and easy to work on. I know that few people have the ability or time to tinker with an old car, so going this route is not a solution to the national problem of chip and other parts shortages.
You are not alone wanting a car without any computers. I would buy a new simple car without computers. Understand that the engine would require a computer but no need for the other 50 or so in new vehicles. Also have been looking for an older car without computers. Should have kept my 63 Alfa Romeo Sprint coupe.

My current 2017 Porsche Boxster is computer heaven. Actually it is a combination of ICE and electric. So many computers that the computers can kill the battery if car not driven often enough. A charger needs to be used with car parked just to run the computers. A year ago the battery was dead. Unfortunately the frunk lid release is electric. Dead battery means no access to the battery for charging because you can not open the frunk. Had to take the battery out of my tractor to jumper it to a positive post at fuse block near brake pedal. That allows you to open the frunk to get to the battery. Also interesting that if the electric emergency brake is on and with dead battery the rear wheels are locked up. Can not move the car. Car is a base manual transmission model without any options. In addition there are many nannies to tell you what to do. I thought after 67 years of driving, I knew how to drive a car. Porsche does not think I can do it without their help. You also can not replace the battery without dealer introducing it to the car. If dead battery you can not just replace the battery. BS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It's a great idea to have some chip mfg in Merikuh, but be prepared to pay Made In Merikuh prices for them. Labor and regulations are a lot more expensive here, which is why companies moved their mfg to other countries. And of course there would be the QC issues with Made In Merikuh, too. I'm not poo-pooing the idea, I think it would be beneficial, but there's a reason why almost everything we buy is made in other countries, and it's not a conspiracy. The cost of making stuff in Merikuh will be passed on to the consumer.
Would the prices have to go up?

Or would the profits have to go down?

C suite folks chasing good quarterly numbers under threat of losing their jobs and their stock options being worthless may not make the best long term decisions for the country or the company.

C suite marshmallows kill companies.

—-
 

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A guy I work with used to be a professional auto technician , he recently bought a new bicycle that has a little 50cc gasoline powered engine , I don't think he's even required to have a license or required to register it.
I understand people that prefer a car over a bicycle but when your talking a modern car vs a bicycle all is good until something goes wrong.
That guy that I work , his worse possible scenario would be something bad goes wrong with his
engine , he could pull that itty bitty engine out and take it in his house/apartment repair or replace.
His worse case scenario not much more work then replacing a battery in a car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·

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The semiconductor shortage is a harbinger of hard times to come, part of the normal human cycle. Breakdown always occurs when a people become degenerate and lose touch with natural law. Rebirth will come from those with practical skills who focus on building. This forum has many such people, and there are tons of similar communities. It's a great time to be alive!
 

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I read about silicon wafer manufacturing, They use this stuff to clean the machine. It is about the nastiest chemical you will ever encounter, Glass catches fire on contact.

You can't mention that chemical without quoting John D. Clark on it! :)

It is, of course, extremely toxic, but that's the least of the problem. It is hypergolic with every known fuel, and so rapidly hypergolic that no ignition delay has ever been measured. It is also hypergolic with such things as cloth, wood, and test engineers, not to mention asbestos, sand, and water—with which it reacts explosively. It can be kept in some of the ordinary structural metals—steel, copper, aluminum, etc.—because of the formation of a thin film of insoluble metal fluoride that protects the bulk of the metal, just as the invisible coat of oxide on aluminum keeps it from burning up in the atmosphere. If, however, this coat is melted or scrubbed off, and has no chance to reform, the operator is confronted with the problem of coping with a metal-fluorine fire. For dealing with this situation, I have always recommended a good pair of running shoes.
 
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