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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
New-to-me Ford Transit XLT Ecoboost with 327K miles. It's a 2017 that was sold by a dealer in Jan of 2018, so only 5 years old... was an ex-shuttle company van doing hundreds of highway miles every day. They seemed pretty good about doing regularly maintenance at independent shops.

Carfax maintenance history shows spark plugs replaced every 40K-75K miles. Most recently was 50K miles ago. However, it's unclear if that included coil packs or only spark plugs.

The #2 cylinder coil pack is not firing, spark plug is fouled. So I'm going to replace that coil pack.

Had a few questions:
1. Should I need to replace the fouled spark plug or just clean up the tips with some sandpaper and re-gap it?
2. If I replace one spark plug, should I be replacing all spark plugs?
3. If I replace one coil pack, should I be replacing all coil packs?
4. Are coil packs considered a wear item? Should I be replacing them proactively at a given mileage, or only if they need replacing?
5. Ford motor parts lists the coil packs at $118 apiece, but RockAuto lists the same Motorcraft part number at $57... these are identical parts, right?
 

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This is not a "Ford Professional Mechanic" type answer. But for me, if I drove it around town, I would replace only the one. If I drove it across the country, I would replace all 6. Just an opinion.
 
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I'd say not necessary, not a wear item.

I had a coil on my Honda van go at 100K just changed the one, Now at over 200K with no other failures. I had one go in my Acura at 175K. Had one go in a Camry at over 300K (looked to be original, I got the car used at 270k). I had one go in my Transit after 500 miles. So no rhyme or reason in my experience for failures. Could always just carry a spare in the glove box if you will be in places where they might not be readily available. Pretty easy to diagnose with an OBD2 dongle.

If you are not sure when the plugs were last changed you should probably do that, or at least check the gaps and change if they are out of spec. Worn plugs with too much gap can cause coil failure. Pretty sure that is what happened with the coil failure on my Honda at 100K. Now I know better.

The PN# on Rock crosses over to an on line Ford parts site. For single small items Amazon might be a bit cheaper than Rock+shipping if you have Prime. I'd only buy off Amazon if the seller is Amazon to avoid reduce the chance of a fake part. If you are buying a bunch of parts from Rock and they ship out of the same warehouse that is often the cheapest way, at least where I live.
 

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One thing to consider is you can purchase a set a lot cheaper than purchasing them one at a time. Both for plugs and coil packs, or even as a set of all of them.
It would also give you peace of mind about the possible failure of the others.
I replaced my plugs at about 112k, but not the coil packs. I had no errors, I just figured that it will be the one and only time I'll replace the plugs for as long as I'll have the van, and I have zero worries about plugs for as long as I own it now. And if I have problems with the coils, the OBD-II will let me know, then I'll replace them all.
 

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I would not buy factory since they are just made in Mexico with many of the other options.

Check Rock Auto. I went with Hitachi but it looks like black and gray with a brown plug in are all made in the same factory.
 

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New-to-me Ford Transit XLT Ecoboost with 327K miles. It's a 2017 that was sold by a dealer in Jan of 2018, so only 5 years old... was an ex-shuttle company van doing hundreds of highway miles every day. They seemed pretty good about doing regularly maintenance at independent shops.

Carfax maintenance history shows spark plugs replaced every 40K-75K miles. Most recently was 50K miles ago. However, it's unclear if that included coil packs or only spark plugs.

The #2 cylinder coil pack is not firing, spark plug is fouled. So I'm going to replace that coil pack.

Had a few questions:
1. Should I need to replace the fouled spark plug or just clean up the tips with some sandpaper and re-gap it?
2. If I replace one spark plug, should I be replacing all spark plugs?
3. If I replace one coil pack, should I be replacing all coil packs?
4. Are coil packs considered a wear item? Should I be replacing them proactively at a given mileage, or only if they need replacing?
5. Ford motor parts lists the coil packs at $118 apiece, but RockAuto lists the same Motorcraft part number at $57... these are identical parts, right?
My experience is to replace all packs and plugs at once. I initially changed 5coil packs and plugs (OEM 85K) as I had difficulty getting the rear driver side plug out. If I remember correctly, you need to remove a hose near the high pressure fuel pump, to remove it. I went on a trip and threw a misfire code about 100 miles in, under acceleration up a grade. I was able to get back home and change the last pack and all has been good since then.

I must say that I DID NOT think leaving one unchanged would cause a problem. I believe the engine may see the internal resistance of the coils and calibrate the engine fire accordingly, thus the need for all to be of similar IR.Or something else caused the misfire, I don't know for sure

I had coil pack problems on a VW Passatt and changing one would solve the problem, on the Transit, not so much
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would not buy factory since they are just made in Mexico with many of the other options.

Check Rock Auto. I went with Hitachi but it looks like black and gray with a brown plug in are all made in the same factory.
I tried buying the cheaper ones of eBay before with my Landcruiser, and all the cheapo ones failed within just a few thousand miles. YouTube / forums are rampant with similar stories. So I'm leery of doing that. I've had good experience with Denso, that's the OEM for most Toyota.

One thing to consider is you can purchase a set a lot cheaper than purchasing them one at a time. Both for plugs and coil packs, or even as a set of all of them.
It would also give you peace of mind about the possible failure of the others.
Really? I see the coil packs sold at RockAuto for example as singles. And that's the cheapest place I've found on-brand new.

I must say that I DID NOT think leaving one unchanged would cause a problem. I believe the engine may see the internal resistance of the coils and calibrate the engine fire accordingly, thus the need for all to be of similar IR.Or something else caused the misfire, I don't know for sure
Like you say, I wonder if there's an internal profile that needs tuning? I recall @cosmicjumperalex mentioning on another thread:

cosmicjumperalex said:
After replacing [spark plugs], get the Keep Alive Memory reset and have the dealership do a Neutral Misfire Profile Correction.
So maybe that's it? I think he said it's no more than an hour of work for them.
 

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Really? I see the coil packs sold at RockAuto for example as singles. And that's the cheapest place I've found on-brand new.
I'm talking about price per coil or sparkplug when bought as a set, not total price when buying one compared to a set. i.e.; $100 for 1 vs $500 for a set (not real prices) means that they are $83 each as a set.

kudos on Longshanks, I'm a direct descendent, along with about a million other people.
 

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New-to-me Ford Transit XLT Ecoboost with 327K miles. It's a 2017 that was sold by a dealer in Jan of 2018, so only 5 years old... was an ex-shuttle company van doing hundreds of highway miles every day. They seemed pretty good about doing regularly maintenance at independent shops.

Carfax maintenance history shows spark plugs replaced every 40K-75K miles. Most recently was 50K miles ago. However, it's unclear if that included coil packs or only spark plugs.

The #2 cylinder coil pack is not firing, spark plug is fouled. So I'm going to replace that coil pack.

Had a few questions:
1. Should I need to replace the fouled spark plug or just clean up the tips with some sandpaper and re-gap it?
2. If I replace one spark plug, should I be replacing all spark plugs?
3. If I replace one coil pack, should I be replacing all coil packs?
4. Are coil packs considered a wear item? Should I be replacing them proactively at a given mileage, or only if they need replacing?
5. Ford motor parts lists the coil packs at $118 apiece, but RockAuto lists the same Motorcraft part number at $57... these are identical parts, right?
I had the #2 coil pak failing at 80,000 mi. Just changed the one but new plugs. No problems at all. Btw I bought Ruthenium plugs, $14 apiece from Rockauto I'll see if they are better than Platinum or Iridium.
 
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