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It's even more easy on transit for a thief. Just break that Giant size fixed window on the Driver or Passenger side door window!
It's a No brainer like the As...... that would break in to our family member Jr. Transit.
 

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Frankly, I'd be more worried by an elk in rut than a bear.
I've had a standoff with a yearling elk trying his game to get at the ladies a big bull elk had gathered together. The guy was running all over and hard to keep track of. He popped out between a couple cars and headed straight towards me. I ended up in a face off with him with nothing to duck behind. Eventually I got him to look to the side, and he went off that way, but it was about 4-5 minutes before he did. If he actually charged me I was going to grab his horns and twist his head over for all I was worth, but I never wanted the encounter to go that way. To much chance to get injured. My main goal was to use my arm and hand to get him to see that he had a clear path to the side and he finally took it.

My other herbivore encounter was with a yearling moose. I knew he was moving down river so I picked a spot far ahead, and went through the trees screening off the river from the road. As soon as he saw me come out on the river side of the trees, he charged. He was still a ways off so I quickly took a few photos with him splashing water as high as his head, then I ducked back through the trees well ahead of him getting to me. Yellowstone information mentions that per encounter, moose are the most likely to attack. They are so big they just don't fear one or two of us.

As for bears, bear spray, and electric fences. I put up an electric fence around my boondocks camps. A couple times I've heard bears yelp, and run away. Paw prints said both were likely grizzlies. It keeps them out of my human food so they don't become problem bears. There are small electric fence chargers that will run off a few D cells, or a car battery. I wonder where I can find a car battery in camp?

Alaska Fish and Game and US Forest Service have good pages on setting up electric fences around camps and other high value bear targets like bee hives and food stores.
 

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on rear doors I put 2 eye bolts - one in each door -
there is a hole in each door about 3ft height

between eye bolts installed a large Carabiner
thru the eye bolts holes -
makes rear doors more secure

15 minutes after I payed for van at dealer
my keys were locked in van by Mystery Ford
door lock glitch -

told salesman what happened he said would call lock smith -
2 minutes later salesman handed me my keys -
my back was turned to van at the time so did not
see what happened -
but they have something that opens door quick-

at that point I Realized the lock is to make
customer feel better
 

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There are places like Sussex Installations in the UK which are able to ship parts and stuff for their Transit security kits. They have secondary deadbolts which are just as effective as the brackets and hockey puck locks, but are a lot less visible and ugly.
 

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First Level of Security - I bought a transit with no rear windows
Second Level - Partition (on order)
Third Level - Linkr GPS Alarm with extra loud Stebel Horns
Fourth level - Slap Locks (on order)
Fifth Level - Killswitch (I plan on doing that one myself)

Info for Slap Lock... I spoke to a representative from the company before I ordered. The Locks are very easy and convenient to use (much easier than the external hasp lock, that's the puck lock on the outside of the door). They lock automatically when you close the door. They're made in Italy and there are three locations for the distribution company in the USA. Any orders are shipped from their location in California. The locks come as a pair. I will be using one one the rear door and the other on the side door.

http://www.transitaccessories.com/slap_lock.php
 

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What about AutoBolt SS? http://theautobolt.com

Someone on the SMB forum installed them circa 2015. I searched this forum, and not a single mention.

I wonder if anyone installed, or considered and rejected, AutoBolt SS?

I like that the company addressed head-on "A THIEF CAN BREAK A WINDOW AND GET IN ANYWAY! This is the #1 response to an invisible deadbolt on vehicle doors…".

Related, I wonder how well "shatterproof glass coating" works? https://youtu.be/GQiNwrB4iAs
 

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How does everyone feel about puck locks? I was looking at Proven Industries, supposedly they are superior to Slick Lock. But Proven doesn't have a drill free hasp, so I was thinking the drill free hasp of Slick Lock and the lock from Proven would be the most secure for sliding door and back doors for outside locks. Then some interior bolting system for the front two doors. Of course the windows are a point of entry, I currently have glass breaking monitors but they are highly sensitive and I would like to do away with them. Then I was also thinking of a Disklock for the steering wheel. Thoughts?
 

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We have multiple layers of security for when we are in the van and when we are away from it, but the starting points are 1) situational awareness and 2) making everything difficult for potential miscreants.
 
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I bought Slick locks four years ago but I never installed them, It ocured to me that it would be easy for somebody to lock me in the van. I am camping in it and all somebody would have to do to lock me in is put a stick in the Slick lock shackle.
 

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Let's suppose I've achieved #1, what are your suggestions for security/inconvenience of break in?
The key part of #1 is a risk assessment based on the where, when and circumstances of where you are. The OEM security is pretty decent, absent of a thief with a chip scanner, nobody is going to drive off in a Transit with out a VIN matched chip key.

In addition to OEM security/chip key, its the usual stuff - nothing tempting visible from the outside, layers of lock boxes. Our valuable stuff is inside a lock box that's inside a bigger lockable storage unit. Decoys can be a good strategy as well. Hidden kill switch(s) are an extra layer. Some discreet fire arms stickers on the outside can't hurt as a deterrent.

Its also useful to plan for the particular situations that you could face but not worry about the ones that don't apply. For us those narrow down to 1) what to do if we return from a hike to find somebody/something breaking into or actually ransacking our van? and 2) What to do if somebody/something attempts to break in while we are inside at some remote location?

For these feasible but unlikely situations bear spray is a great option but you must have a face mask on before using it in an enclosed space and you should buy a few can and practice with it (in a remote and open space). And finally, we do choose to be armed but understand not everybody is comfortable with that.

The flip side to all of this is that in 45 years of camping and hiking we have never had a single negative encounter or issue.
 
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Older thread...different approach....

I will be leaving my van at remote trailheads for days sometimes, with valuable bikes and other roadtripping gear inside. Knowing a rock is easy-entry, I am planning on bars/grates on the windows and looking for a way to lock the doors from the inside to prevent them from being opened. Even if the big slider window is smashed, and they reach in and unlock the door, the interior door locks will keep the door shut and the bars/grate will make it impossible (within reason) for my bike to pass through. The rear doors will be easy to lock from inside with simple Home Depot hardware, but I haven't figured out the slider. Not sure if a bike can make it over the seats and out the front doors, and I won't put in a bulk head. Maybe a security bar or two that is installed at the bulkhead in just such scenarios could be rigged up.

I agree that more outside locks just draw attention, but again, a cracked-out evil-doer in a remote location will be busting into everything in sight.

Anyone done something similar with inside locks?
 

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I would almost prefer to leave the doors unlocked with a big sign stating the fact. Perhaps in small print below: "Take what you need but please leave the van and don't break anything".

Almost.

I can imagine just how trashed the van would be upon return if I made a serious (expensive, time consuming) effort to prevent theft.
 
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If you are an hour or more up a trail and your van is all alone and left to the mercy of trailhead tweakers, nothing will prevent them from getting in and ransacking it.

OldMadBrit said the best thing: situational awareness, making it difficult to steal stuff.

If there is broken window glass all over a parking area, THAT IS NOT A GOOD PLACE to leave your van unattended because it's someone's foraging grounds.
The old adage that crooks will only spend 5 minutes after breaking into a house or car is probably not true anymore, especially at trailheads with no one around. I'd raise that to 30-60 minutes. Get a safe or something that can withstand an hour of a tweaker attempting to remove it with basic tools and a cordless grinder/sawzall.

My advices would be to just not be so financially or emotionally attached to anything that you leave in your van that it is "irreplaceable". Hide and lock stuff up fer sure, but don't expect that to be a 100% guaranty that anything will be there when you return. If you're worried about the whole van being stolen, disable it by removing a crucial fuse or relay, and park in a way that it would be very difficult to tow it off with a tweaker truck and chain.

I think adding a lot of external locks, bars on the windows, and other security stuff just makes it a more appealing target because they think you have stuff in there more worth stealing.
 

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Yep with todays high powered compact cordless power tools , no bother
with steel bar reinforcement , get a good insurance policy and heavy duty
lock box that can’t be broken into to quickly, good reason not to spend
20k plus on fancy electrical power systems ,and fancy custom wheels.
 

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Another thing to consider is that remoteness itself is a good barrier. Tweeked out meth-heads are not typically going to spend hours traversing remote and gnarly trails to forage for pickings. Our experience so far, has been that the further out you go, the less likely you are to encounter crazies. Their own cray-cray tends to limit their ability to keep it together enough to get to the more remote places. Personally, i feel more comfortable leaving our van at a remote trail head for a couple of nights (while we hike), than I do parking it on Main St., in some of the sketchier run-down towns that we have passed through.
 

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Yeah, places like Horseshoe Canyon and Toroweap Overlook are fairly safe bets to avoid tweakers.
 
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Older thread...different approach....

I will be leaving my van at remote trailheads for days sometimes, with valuable bikes and other roadtripping gear inside. Knowing a rock is easy-entry, I am planning on bars/grates on the windows and looking for a way to lock the doors from the inside to prevent them from being opened. Even if the big slider window is smashed, and they reach in and unlock the door, the interior door locks will keep the door shut and the bars/grate will make it impossible (within reason) for my bike to pass through. The rear doors will be easy to lock from inside with simple Home Depot hardware, but I haven't figured out the slider. Not sure if a bike can make it over the seats and out the front doors, and I won't put in a bulk head. Maybe a security bar or two that is installed at the bulkhead in just such scenarios could be rigged up.

I agree that more outside locks just draw attention, but again, a cracked-out evil-doer in a remote location will be busting into everything in sight.

Anyone done something similar with inside locks?
idk? Electric deadbolts that open with your keyfob. Then there is window security screens for all of the back windows.
If you are really going to secure anything you need that bulkhead.

 

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about 10 seconds, three 10-12" cuts with a cordless grinder, and you; well, not YOU, can peel away the sheetmetal where the lock is on any of the doors and unlock it.

A friend in NYC told me about apartments in her building getting broken in to in the 80's. People had steel doors, multiple deadbolts and locks, like 5 all up the door. The thieves would just cut through the drywall in the hall next to the door, then the interior drywall, and either reach in and unlock everything or just make the hole big enough to step through. So many people think a highly reinforced door will stop crooks. Not if there's something flimsy that can just be kicked through right next to the door like drywall...or a window.
 
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about 10 seconds, three 10-12" cuts with a cordless grinder, and you; well, not YOU, can peel away the sheetmetal where the lock is on any of the doors and unlock it.

A friend in NYC told me about apartments in her building getting broken in to in the 80's. People had steel doors, multiple deadbolts and locks, like 5 all up the door. The thieves would just cut through the drywall in the hall next to the door, then the interior drywall, and either reach in and unlock everything or just make the hole big enough to step through. So many people think a highly reinforced door will stop crooks. Not if there's something flimsy that can just be kicked through right next to the door like drywall...or a window.
I remember watching a movie showing the bad guys holed up in a house, "secure" behind a reinforced steel door. Popo came in through the walls with gas powered diamond saws. Cute and all, but IRL det-cord gets the job done faster and with better outcomes.
 
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