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I'm guessing it is related to the older, European Transits that used a disc detainer style locking mechanism. Ours use a different style locking mechanism, which is somewhat more secure.
 

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I'm concerned about someone opening my rear door using a Six Finger and a coat hang wire. That finger latch on the rear door is easy access for any evil deed-doer with half a brain.
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Smith & Wesson .500 and a good insurance policy.
It must suck to stay awake staring at your van 24 hours a day 7 days a week. That's the only way a handgun is going to protect it. ;)
 
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My security is to not leave stuff in it I want to keep. And to cover it when I have to have it in there for a bit.
 

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Install Slick locks on the rear and side door to begin with and follow that with metal mesh window screens.
Thoughs were the first things I installed after I bought my 2015 Transit 250.
I have the Vehicle Security System and will install it next.

Those large non-movable front side windows are heaven for a car thief I must admit.

That is why I am adding the security alarm system.

I saw a Utube video for Transit owners in England showing how to upgrade the front door locks.

I would install those as well if I could find them here in the US.
 

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It must suck to stay awake staring at your van 24 hours a day 7 days a week. That's the only way a handgun is going to protect it. ;)
It doesn't suck at all because I don't do that. FYI, I have to open carry it when I do because it's way too big to conceal. Truth be told, I only carry that gun when I'm in bear country.
 

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It doesn't suck at all because I don't do that. FYI, I have to open carry it when I do because it's way too big to conceal. Truth be told, I only carry that gun when I'm in bear country.
It's pretty unlikely that any handgun will do anything but piss off a bear if it is attacking.
Even if you are carrying a humungous caliber (with its large handheld recoil), if you somehow manage (under stress) a head shot at something charging you at 30MPH, even a fatal wound will be too late for you.

It's also pretty easy to avoid an unwanted conflict with a bear. I DO live in bear country, so I know it isn't rocket science.

If you feel a need to go and shoot a bear, take a decent rifle or shotgun.
And you'll still be in a position to put holes in a kid trying to lift your Transit' stereo.
 

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It's pretty unlikely that any handgun will do anything but piss off a bear if it is attacking.
Even if you are carrying a humungous caliber (with its large handheld recoil), if you somehow manage (under stress) a head shot at something charging you at 30MPH, even a fatal wound will be too late for you.

It's also pretty easy to avoid an unwanted conflict with a bear. I DO live in bear country, so I know it isn't rocket science.

If you feel a need to go and shoot a bear, take a decent rifle or shotgun.
And you'll still be in a position to put holes in a kid trying to lift your Transit' stereo.
Would you suggest I not carry one when I'm remotely fishing and just pray that the bear isn't hungry and pissed because I'm in his/her territory. A .500 will move a bear off but if he's charging you don't have a prayer no matter what defenses you have. FYI, I don't hunt bear but I've had them hunt me and trust me, you can't carry enough clean underware when that happens.

As for defending my van, that was just said as a humorous response because if theives want it, they will get it no matter what you do. It's why we carry insurance that's adequate.
 

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GUNS GUNS GUNS!

An airhorn works as well as a .50 rifle on a bear. Too many people think they need to kill a bear to get it to leave. Many decades ago I carried a .22 with a type of shot round for rattlesnakes, but having never needed to "defend myself" from rattlesnakes, because they didn't care that I was walking through the woods or desert, I stopped taking along the extra weight. There is hardly anything I can think of that you need to shoot to get it to leave you alone, except maybe crackheads and tweakers, and they aren't in the wilderness. I do a specific type of guiding in wilderness a few times a year, and there's always someone that thinks they need to be armed, but it's far more psychological than practical; they are just scared of things they don't know or understand. I make them leave their guns at camp so they don't shoot one of the other people on our night hikes, thinking they are a dangerous animal (rabid squirrel?) or "monster". The guys who are currently active law enforcement can pack if they want to, but more often than not it's so they don't have to worry about their sidearm being stolen while we're in the brush. I don't trust the civilians, even ex-military, to be packing when we do this, because they all seem to be jumpy and use the gun as an emotional crutch (years ago had one PTSD guy fire off a couple rounds in the air because he "heard something", thus the no-guns policy).

I know where this is headed; we should start a "GUNZ!" thread under some non-transit sub-forum.

Back to topic:
Does anyone actually steal stereos anymore? I haven't heard about that happening in a LONG time, and I live in a fairly bad part of the Bay Area. I seldom see broken car windows or glass on the ground, except at the parks. It seems they are after cell phones and purses or packs left in sight, not stereos. Oh, and fancy rims! Work trucks full of tools and band vans full of instruments would be targets, though. I still think the best way to prevent break-ins is to keep everything out of sight, and if possible, install metal locking containers for valuable stuff. The best alarm system in the world won't stop a rock or a wrench from smashing a window to allow thieves inside. I've heard that thieves have an internal clock, and if it takes more than 5 minutes they give up and run off. I'm not sure if tweakers and crackheads have that internal clock, and if they do it's more than likely messed up. Something as secure as jobsite boxes, but vertical to be used as shelves, would be ideal. The usual metal lockers for vans are flimsy and could be opened with a crowbar or cordless grinder.
 
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Please bear with just a bit more bear discussion. If you are boondocking in you van, or hiking/backpacking, or fishing from your base camp, you should educate yourself a bit about bear human interactions.

A black bear (like around here), simply will not hassle a person unless that person is a threat to cubs, has been really sloppy with tasty smelling edibles, is running away in panic, or has a dog that is running free and acting like a threat (same threat as a person). Or exceedingly rarely, the bear had previously been wounded by a person, and survived to tell the tale.
Attacks are incredibly rare, fatalities even less common. I seem to remember that under 70 bear caused fatalities in the entire U.S>. since 1900. And something like 6 attacks in Washington over the last 50 years. Two orders of magnitude fewer than the number of documented dogs attacking folks.

Any loud noisemaker (as Bill suggests) will be at least as effective as the short sound of firing a round. A bear may not even associate a gunshot sound as a threat.
And bear spray is a better idea if the odd bear does get too close-up curious.

Frankly, I'd be more worried by an elk in rut than a bear.
And far more worried about running into a back-country pot operation. I'll carry if that is an active threat where I have every right to be camping, but it won't be a hand cannon.

Grizzlies may be a different matter...I've never had the pleasure of meeting one. But from what I read, a handgun won't do any better than the other methods of alertness, avoidance, and care.

Steve, I'm not suggesting that you don't carry...your choice. I am suggesting that it may not be as much of an effective deterrent as you hope.
 

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GUNS GUNS GUNS!

An airhorn works as well as a .50 rifle on a bear. Too many people think they need to kill a bear to get it to leave. Many decades ago I carried a .22 with a type of shot round for rattlesnakes, but having never needed to "defend myself" from rattlesnakes, because they didn't care that I was walking through the woods or desert, I stopped taking along the extra weight. There is hardly anything I can think of that you need to shoot to get it to leave you alone, except maybe crackheads and tweakers, and they aren't in the wilderness. I do a specific type of guiding in wilderness a few times a year, and there's always someone that thinks they need to be armed, but it's far more psychological than practical; they are just scared of things they don't know or understand. I make them leave their guns at camp so they don't shoot one of the other people on our night hikes, thinking they are a dangerous animal (rabid squirrel?) or "monster". The guys who are currently active law enforcement can pack if they want to, but more often than not it's so they don't have to worry about their sidearm being stolen while we're in the brush. I don't trust the civilians, even ex-military, to be packing when we do this, because they all seem to be jumpy and use the gun as an emotional crutch (years ago had one PTSD guy fire off a couple rounds in the air because he "heard something", thus the no-guns policy).

I know where this is headed; we should start a "GUNZ!" thread under some non-transit sub-forum.

Back to topic:
Does anyone actually steal stereos anymore? I haven't heard about that happening in a LONG time, and I live in a fairly bad part of the Bay Area. I seldom see broken car windows or glass on the ground, except at the parks. It seems they are after cell phones and purses or packs left in sight, not stereos. Oh, and fancy rims! Work trucks full of tools and band vans full of instruments would be targets, though. I still think the best way to prevent break-ins is to keep everything out of sight, and if possible, install metal locking containers for valuable stuff. The best alarm system in the world won't stop a rock or a wrench from smashing a window to allow thieves inside. I've heard that thieves have an internal clock, and if it takes more than 5 minutes they give up and run off. I'm not sure if tweakers and crackheads have that internal clock, and if they do it's more than likely messed up. Something as secure as jobsite boxes, but vertical to be used as shelves, would be ideal. The usual metal lockers for vans are flimsy and could be opened with a crowbar or cordless grinder.
China China China and motivation motivation motivation

JMHO but things just don't cost as much (electronics) and kids aren't interested in stealing my tools anymore. They don't know their value nor do they want to use them. Maybe I am just old and grumpy. I did put a full alarm system in my van but that is just me being paranoid.

BTW (though) I was on a service call the other day, parked probably 30 feet from where I was working on a door, and I didn't arm or lock my van. Sure enough someone saw my iPod touch (which looked exactly like an expensive gold iPhone) opened the door and ran off with it and the cord. It was an older gen 5 so it was really a disappointment (and not worth $100) to the thief when he discovered what he had. A valuable lesson learned at minimum expense (always arm the alarm!).
 
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