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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2020 AWD LWB finally arrived 2 days ago and I took a crack at scopema passenger swivel install yesterday. It is installed and functions. I followed the steps others have mentioned and also disconnected the battery just in case as mentioned by other swivel seat installers of other vans(probably unnecessary but it was easy). The battery disconnect on 2020 is much easier I think-advance seat, 2 screw removed so metal cover comes off, remove plastic cover and then negative/positive terminals).
  • Unfortunately the holes from swivel to base(the one connected to van floor, NOT the bottom of seat) did not line up(right rear hole was off). I filed down holes as little as possible to fit in screws and was able to insert them all. The scopema holes for base come countersunk to fit their specialized screws that should lay flush in the countersunk holes. Unfortunately my modification resulted in the screws being slightly offset. This causes the head of screw to only meet the base with about 50% of head. I suspect this is fine but obviously causes some anxiety as the base ideally should meet 100% of head of screw and may induce some directional torque in an accident. I will likely try and modify the countersunk hole to have it lay as flush as possible. luckily the holes from swivel to seat were fine and no further modification were needed. I don't know yet if driver's side swivel holes are off as well yet.
  • The other issue is the motor strikes the swivel central portion when the seat is advanced forward. it can still pass forward but is pushed up a little and I worry may damage motor. I will try and put some fender washers to elevate seat slightly and avoid having the motor strike the swivel.
  • lastly, the seat electrical harness comes through the central hole of the swivel. if the seat is advanced forward(quite a bit), it hits the harness and I worry may sever it. There is really no reason to go this far forward so not a real issue but I worry if I forget may accidentally damage it. I will try and come up with a solution but none yet.

I will update when driver side is installed!
 

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Thanks for the info! I just contacted a local seller about some swivels on my 2020 AWD and he wanted me to come in and he'd install them. This will be super helpful.
 

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[*]Unfortunately the holes from swivel to base(the one connected to van floor, NOT the bottom of seat) did not line up(right rear hole was off). I filed down holes as little as possible to fit in screws and was able to insert them all. The scopema holes for base come countersunk to fit their specialized screws that should lay flush in the countersunk holes. Unfortunately my modification resulted in the screws being slightly offset. This causes the head of screw to only meet the base with about 50% of head. I suspect this is fine but obviously causes some anxiety as the base ideally should meet 100% of head of screw and may induce some directional torque in an accident. I will likely try and modify the countersunk hole to have it lay as flush as possible. luckily the holes from swivel to seat were fine and no further modification were needed. I don't know yet if driver's side swivel holes are off as well yet.

I will update when driver side is installed!
I had this exact issue with my 2019 wagon. I used an enerpac cylinder to “persuade” the holes in the foundation apart from each other about an extra 1/8-3/6”. I had the same worry about the flathead screw not seating correctly in the countersunk hole.

The driver side swivel fit perfectly, just the passenger side base had the bad hole pattern.

For the motor interfering with the swivel, I fabricated some slider/raisers to push the motor cross support up a little bit. This also helps with the wire harness not being hit.


Edit: oh yeah, the driver side hand brake modifications were a huge PITA!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I had this exact issue with my 2019 wagon. I used an enerpac cylinder to “persuade” the holes in the foundation apart from each other about an extra 1/8-3/6”. I had the same worry about the flathead screw not seating correctly in the countersunk hole.

The driver side swivel fit perfectly, just the passenger side base had the bad hole pattern.

For the motor interfering with the swivel, I fabricated some slider/raisers to push the motor cross support up a little bit. This also helps with the wire harness not being hit.


Edit: oh yeah, the driver side hand brake modifications were a huge PITA!!
That is great news that it may just be the passenger side. So for the slider/raiser, did you just go to the far edge of plastic housing(holding motor shaft) and elevate it on felt of something that moves with it easily and won't get hung up on swivel center?

And definitely NOT looking forward to hand brake modification!
 

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That is great news that it may just be the passenger side. So for the slider/raiser, did you just go to the far edge of plastic housing(holding motor shaft) and elevate it on felt of something that moves with it easily and won't get hung up on swivel center?

And definitely NOT looking forward to hand brake modification!

Here are a few pictures of the riser I printed. it has a tunnel through the middle to zip tie it in place. I need to make it a little shorter but it is working for now.



 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yesterday I installed the driver's scopema swivel. It took all day(9 hours), much longer than I had anticipated, even for noob like me. This involved a trip to home depot and a friend's house to get an angle grinder. Here are some highlights:
  • it was surprisingly difficult to remove some of the unwelded nuts. The housing for the large gauge battery wires sits up against side of seat base blocking some of the nuts. I had difficulty fitting my fingers in behind this with a wrench. After many exclamations, job done.
  • the hardest part was removing the welded nut and screws. If I had used the angle grinder on the nut to start it would have been much easier(I initially was using a dremel with thin cut bit). The welded screws on the other hand were more difficult. I cut the end of screw off with grinder then used a metal step drill bit(Milwaukee #1 1/8 in. - 1/2 in. x 1/32 in. Black Oxide Step Drill Bit-48-89-9201 - The Home Depot) to remove the rest.
  • I was able to modify the metal bracket that sits against the floor and protects the airbag module much less than faroutride(Antoine) did. Sorry, I don't have pictures. Those who get the "Ford Programmable Battery Guard(FPBG)" may have significant difficulty in inability to lower the brake if this is in place.
  • I probably spent an hour modifying the plastic shroud that covers the brake mechanism. I was able to make it look like it did before lowering the brake but had to cut off all the male connection points. Despite this, it still sits quite firmly in place.
  • The plastic battery guard has some flanges that sit high and don't allow swivel to sit flush so I cut these off with jigsaw. After modifying the guard and negative plastic flap I was able to make it fit with some pressure from swivel. I don't think the guard is hitting the battery or guards.
  • the scopema base went on as expected except I noticed there are 2 tiny metal pieces on rear of seat base that don't allow the seat to sit flush on swivel. I used a fender washer between base and swivel and this solved the problem.
  • the steering wheel needs to be pushed in to rotate swivel.
  • again like for passenger side the seat strikes the swivel base and loom. I will try a mod like shade, maybe can zip tie the motor mechanism to seat base instead of using a slider?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here is a picture of the battery guard flange after a cut it. Also included are some pics of the 2020 single battery fuse box for those that are curious.
Red Hand Finger
Electronics Technology Electronic component Electronic device Fuse
Technology Electronics Auto part Vehicle Machine
 

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@Viajero, pic1 makes the pass seat look to be bar stool height. If you were able to measure, how much height did the swivel add to seat base?
And thanks for the detailed write up...extremely helpful!
 

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  • it was surprisingly difficult to remove some of the unwelded nuts. The housing for the large gauge battery wires sits up against side of seat base blocking some of the nuts. I had difficulty fitting my fingers in behind this with a wrench. After many exclamations, job done.
  • the hardest part was removing the welded nut and screws. If I had used the angle grinder on the nut to start it would have been much easier(I initially was using a dremel with thin cut bit). The welded screws on the other hand were more difficult. I cut the end of screw off with grinder then used a metal step drill bit(Milwaukee #1 1/8 in. - 1/2 in. x 1/32 in. Black Oxide Step Drill Bit-48-89-9201 - The Home Depot) to remove the rest.
  • again like for passenger side the seat strikes the swivel base and loom. I will try a mod like shade, maybe can zip tie the motor mechanism to seat base instead of using a slider?
I feel your pain. My install was very similar with many expletives and way too many hours. I luckily had access to a hydraulic press and was able to push those stamped or riveted bolts out of the bracket. Still a huge mess and full disassembly of the driver seat, base, and batteries.


I like your idea of pulling the motor crossbar up rather than spacers. I will look at switching to that.
 

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My 2020 AWD LWB finally arrived 2 days ago and I took a crack at scopema passenger swivel install yesterday. It is installed and functions. I followed the steps others have mentioned and also disconnected the battery just in case as mentioned by other swivel seat installers of other vans(probably unnecessary but it was easy). The battery disconnect on 2020 is much easier I think-advance seat, 2 screw removed so metal cover comes off, remove plastic cover and then negative/positive terminals).
  • Unfortunately the holes from swivel to base(the one connected to van floor, NOT the bottom of seat) did not line up(right rear hole was off). I filed down holes as little as possible to fit in screws and was able to insert them all. The scopema holes for base come countersunk to fit their specialized screws that should lay flush in the countersunk holes. Unfortunately my modification resulted in the screws being slightly offset. This causes the head of screw to only meet the base with about 50% of head. I suspect this is fine but obviously causes some anxiety as the base ideally should meet 100% of head of screw and may induce some directional torque in an accident. I will likely try and modify the countersunk hole to have it lay as flush as possible. luckily the holes from swivel to seat were fine and no further modification were needed. I don't know yet if driver's side swivel holes are off as well yet.
  • The other issue is the motor strikes the swivel central portion when the seat is advanced forward. it can still pass forward but is pushed up a little and I worry may damage motor. I will try and put some fender washers to elevate seat slightly and avoid having the motor strike the swivel.
  • lastly, the seat electrical harness comes through the central hole of the swivel. if the seat is advanced forward(quite a bit), it hits the harness and I worry may sever it. There is really no reason to go this far forward so not a real issue but I worry if I forget may accidentally damage it. I will try and come up with a solution but none yet.
I will update when driver side is installed!
I just went to install my Scopema passenger swivel today and I too had this problem. Only 2 holes would ever line up.

My instinct was to file/drill out the holes in the swivel base in order to be able to mate the provided countersunk screws to the welded nuts in the transit seat base box. My partner, however, mentioned that maybe we could just cut off the welded nuts and adjust the hole in the stock seat base box since the metal was thinner and the fix was probably easier to accomplish this way. Then, perhaps just spot welt a couple new nuts on the underside of the seat base box lip.

Which do you think is better? That Scopema plate is thick and solid. I would tend to think if I enlarged the holes on the Scopema it would offer superior strength in a modified state over adjusting the holes on the transit seat base box, but we don't do this sort of thing and really don't have a knowledge base on which to draw.

Also, which of the 4 connection points should we modify? We are only going to get 2 real good unmodified connections and those options are:
1. the two front closest to the windshield
2. the two closest to the drivers seat (one front one rear)

Thanks anyone for any input.

Also, was anyone else surprised that it only locks in one position? I expected it to have at least 2 (forward and rear facing) if not a couple different angles...
 

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I just went to install my Scopema passenger swivel today and I too had this problem. Only 2 holes would ever line up.

My instinct was to file/drill out the holes in the swivel base in order to be able to mate the provided countersunk screws to the welded nuts in the transit seat base box. My partner, however, mentioned that maybe we could just cut off the welded nuts and adjust the hole in the stock seat base box since the metal was thinner and the fix was probably easier to accomplish this way. Then, perhaps just spot welt a couple new nuts on the underside of the seat base box lip.

Which do you think is better? That Scopema plate is thick and solid. I would tend to think if I enlarged the holes on the Scopema it would offer superior strength in a modified state over adjusting the holes on the transit seat base box, but we don't do this sort of thing and really don't have a knowledge base on which to draw.

Also, which of the 4 connection points should we modify? We are only going to get 2 real good unmodified connections and those options are:
1. the two front closest to the windshield
2. the two closest to the drivers seat (one front one rear)

Thanks anyone for any input.

Also, was anyone else surprised that it only locks in one position? I expected it to have at least 2 (forward and rear facing) if not a couple different angles...
I'm having the exact same issue as you. Both of the outside connections are about 3/8" off from lining up.

Automotive exterior Bumper Auto part Metal Steel Auto part Sink
 

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I'm leaning towards knocking off the two welded on nuts towards the passenger door, elongating those holes back towards the rear of the van, and reinstalling with the same nut and a locking washer. Seems like less material to remove than altering the swivel and you can maintain the connection on the countersunk bolt head.

EDIT: Those nuts seem to be welded on quite well. Can't persuade them off yet. Not a huge fan of grinding away at the swivel base as you'd be cutting pretty significantly into the material between the hole and the edge of the swivel. Anyone have any recommendations?

Auto part Bumper Gas
 

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For a second I was confused how you got pictures of my van from earlier today!

Yeah it’s that front hole that would get too close to the edge on the plate. The rear one would be just fine. Anyway, let me know how it goes removing that nut. I won’t get back to it for a couple days.
 

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Ours were close enough -- (2020/power seats/scopemas). I used the jack to push the 4th hole into place (Passenger Side). With 3 bolts installed -- it made incredibly easy work of it..might want to try that if the base (pedestal) needs to be persuaded 'outward.' If it's inward -- a high quality bar clamp will work. I included some pictures on another thread.
 

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I tackled this project again today and had much more luck. We ended up partially threading front left, front right and rear left bolts and grunted and swore enough to get the threads to bite on the fourth bolt and pull the hole into alignment. I believe it was the "dad strength" that my brother possessed and I am clearly lacking.

The holes on the seat side of the swivel matched up no problem. Finally took a fair amount of trimming the plastics with an oscillating saw and cutting the metal supports behind them to get the swivel rotating without any issues.
 

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Did the driver side today and it went much smoother than the passenger side. I have the lowered parking brake so there was no interference from that. The bolt holes lined up on the swivel and the install was relatively painless. Took out the factory bracing over the batteries, but I figure the lower plate of the swivel should do an even better job of keeping the batteries in place.


Tire Technology Trunk Electronics Auto part

Just need to figure out a little ziptie trick or a slider to elevate the electric motor for both the passenger and driver side.
 
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