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I bought the spray insulation (great stuff in two small tanks) kit to spray (carefully) to insulate my interior with when the temps here in Colorado allow. I read in Greg Keith's Sprinter conversion ebook that I need to be careful not to cover up any weep holes that allow van to breathe.

Can anyone confirm 1) the Transit has these (and where are they) and 2) need to not block them (and why)??

Thanks!
 

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I bought the spray insulation (great stuff in two small tanks) kit to spray (carefully) to insulate my interior with when the temps here in Colorado allow.
Thanks!
It sounds like you got the right "stuff", but don't make the mistake of confusing it with "Great Stuff". Great stuff is open cell foam, permeable to moisture, and will rust you out from the inside.

You're probably already aware that you want closed cell foam, and I believe most of the tank kits are closed cell. But given the consequences of open cell, I just wanted to clarify for anyone else reading... :)
 

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It sounds like you got the right "stuff", but don't make the mistake of confusing it with "Great Stuff". Great stuff is open cell foam, permeable to moisture, and will rust you out from the inside.

You're probably already aware that you want closed cell foam, and I believe most of the tank kits are closed cell. But given the consequences of open cell, I just wanted to clarify for anyone else reading... :)
From what I can find Great Stuff is closed cell foam.

http://www.drenergysaver.com/insulation/insulation-materials/choosing-spray-foam-insulation.html

Please post information you have found that says it is open cell.
 

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From what I can find Great Stuff is closed cell foam.

http://www.drenergysaver.com/insulation/insulation-materials/choosing-spray-foam-insulation.html

Please post information you have found that says it is open cell.
That's interesting, and surprising. Boatbuilders and kayakers hate the Great Stuff in single spray cans that you buy at Home Depot, etc. Hate it because it's widely agreed that it absorbs water, adds weight, and becomes a growth medium for mold and such.
 

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That's interesting, and surprising. Boatbuilders and kayakers hate the Great Stuff in single spray cans that you buy at Home Depot, etc. Hate it because it's widely agreed that it absorbs water, adds weight, and becomes a growth medium for mold and such.
What do boatbuilders and kayakers use instead of Great Stuff? Is it available in similar packaging? I am not a proponent of Great Stuff but need something similar. A van is a bit different than a boat in that the insulation is not subject to as much water.
 

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From:

http://www.drenergysaver.com/insulation/insulation-materials/choosing-spray-foam-insulation.html

"Canned foam like GREAT STUFF™ is a closed-cell foam that comes in “single-component” form. The closed-cell foam that contractors use on large-scale spray foam jobs is also known as “two-component” foam or polyurethane foam. Two chemical compounds are blended together at the application nozzle, causing the expanding foam reaction.

Even though it’s more expensive to install than open-cell foam, closed-cell foam is often preferred for insulation projects because it offers higher R-value –between R-6 and R-7.1 per in.; and because it forms an effective moisture barrier. The ability to block moisture transmission while also providing air sealing and high insulation value is an advantage in many applications"
 

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From:

http://www.greenbuildingtalk.com/Forums/tabid/53/aff/14/aft/71269/afv/topic/Default.aspx

"On the Great Stuff website, I found this buried in an FAQ page:
How are latex products different from GREAT STUFF™? There are two key differences between latex foam and GREAT STUFF™, which is a polyurethane foam:
1. Latex foams are typically "open cell" and, as a result, can take on water. In fact, the same properties that allow you to wash latex foam off your hands with water also mean that the cured foam can absorb water. This can cause wood rot or deterioration in areas where wet latex foam is next to wood, such as a window frame. In contrast, GREAT STUFF™ is a closed-cell foam. It forms a water-resistant outer coating when cured.
2. Latex foam does not expand. GREAT STUFF™ expands to thoroughly fill all voids and cavities making it an ideal air sealant.
"
 

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What do boatbuilders and kayakers use instead of Great Stuff? Is it available in similar packaging? I am not a proponent of Great Stuff but need something similar. A van is a bit different than a boat in that the insulation is not subject to as much water.
I have no experience with spray-in foams in boats. There is talk on that thread joefromga linked, talking about spray-in. Also, person who opines that the Great Stuff "closed cell" becomes porous when the outer skin is removed.
Polystyrene that I've seen has been used as dock flotation, and under-seat flotation blocks in row boats. In kayak outfitting and flotation, we use expensive blocks of minicel foam, glued or mechanically fitted into place.


Occasionally a kayak person will have the bright idea of spraying Great Stuff into a plastic back, so that it can be shaped, and to keep it from getting wet. A guy in that boat thread suggested it... I've tried it. It won't work. It needs lots of air to activate, which it won't get in a plastic bag.
 

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The boat people don't recommend any 1 or 2 part foam at all and recommend only polystyrene foam which is pre-made at factories. Here are some good comments:
http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/i-thinking-using-great-stuff-20468.html
I think only one of the BoatDesign forum members is advocating only using polystyrene and he eventually backtracks from that opinion a bit. Their final consensus (with lots of evidence) is that two part polyurethane foams are suitable for boats and don't absorb water.

For the much less demanding task of insulating a van, the two part polyurethane foam kit that you buy at Home Depot should be fine.
 

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I used Great Stuff on my Sprinter conversion to fill the gaps between rigid polyiso insulation boards. Used it to "glue" the rigid boards in place. Hate the stuff but it worked very well. Did not have a problem with it.

Another Sprinter owner did the whole inside of his van with spray cans. He is a kayaker who hauls wet boats inside his van. He recently removed a wall panel and reported that after 5 years it looks the same as when he installed it. Maybe the stuff works when not subject to liquid water as opposed to just moisture in the air. The outer skin in this application would not be disturbed.

I did read that the foam is activated by the moisture in the air. I also learned to heat the can before use. Great Stuff deteriorates very quickly when exposed to sunlight. I also sent an email today to Dow asking if it is open or closed cell. Have not received an answer yet.

For the Transit build I will use both rigid polyiso in some locations and flexible Aerocel closed cell foam in other places. Just completed the insulation of the deep cavities above and below the rear window indents. Used two layers of 1" Aerocel partially covered with Reflectix. There is air space between the Reflectix and the 1/8" plywood wall cover. That worked much better than stuffing small pieces of rigid into the cavities like I did on the Sprinter. Used spray foam to hold the small pieces together in the Sprinter. No spay foam used with the Aerocel/Reflectix method.

On the other subject about weep holes in the bottom of the lower cavities. Did not find them in my cargo van. I poked around with baling wire and did not locate any. Also saw a new Transit at the dealer with about a 3" deep puddle in one of the lower cavities. The fasteners that hold on the black plastic exterior cladding do leak. I sealed mine before adding the insulation.
 

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Also saw a new Transit at the dealer with about a 3" deep puddle in one of the lower cavities. The fasteners that hold on the black plastic exterior cladding do leak. I sealed mine before adding the insulation.
Me too! I heeded one of your earlier posts, siting experience with this type of leak on Sprinters, I think.
 

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On the other subject about weep holes in the bottom of the lower cavities. Did not find them in my cargo van. I poked around with baling wire and did not locate any. Also saw a new Transit at the dealer with about a 3" deep puddle in one of the lower cavities. The fasteners that hold on the black plastic exterior cladding do leak. I sealed mine before adding the insulation.
How did you seal them, from the inside or outside? What did you use, silicone?
 
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