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Thus far we are happy with our Qlift experience. Alex and the whole team at Newberg were great. Basically the opposite of working with our local Lithia Ford dealer. Alex picks up on the first ring and addresses you by name and treats you like a human. He is clearly an enthusiast and loves his job. I am very confident that they would help us address any issues down the road despite being 600 miles away.

The only oddity I can report after the lift is that the turbo sounds much louder and more fluttery. I think with the subframe drop, there is a resonance effect in the tunnel area. Some people would pay for this sound, but I find it somewhat bothersome. I already have a 6.7 cummins for when I want to be heard. My fiance drove the van home and she didn't even notice it. I got in and pulled away and immediately noticed it, so YMMV. FWIW too, with the Bilstein's I really think our lift looks more significant than most others and seems to have more of a leveling effect. The van looks and feels dramatically taller both when stepping into it and when sitting in the driveway. Rides and drives great. I only did the Bilsteins up front but I have VC shock relocate and bilsteins on the way for the rear, so I will report back once it is done, the Nokians are off for the summer, and we have some more miles in her.

One thing VC got right is that the Qlift approach is much more complex. The parts list for our lift was 3 pages long. I'm confident the Qlift is the better approach overall and if you're willing to give up the Quigley warranty offers the potential for even more lift down the road, particularly with the coilover options that seem to be in the pipeline.

The photos are with 225/75r16 Nokian C3's.

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Dogdude222, that is looking great! I see that and am no longer scared that I won't be able to go places (that I already go in my Subaru - but it's missing several van advantages)

Is your color Ingot Silver? Avalanche Gray? Or? It looks really nice.

One thing VC got right is that the Qlift approach is much more complex. The parts list for our lift was 3 pages long. I'm confident it is the better approach overall and if you're willing to give up the Quigley warranty offers the potential for even more lift down the road
I think you are saying that you are confident the VC is the better approach, but I'm not 100% sure so just wanted to check. Someday I may have a van to make these decisions about 🙃
 

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very interested to hear this, so with the B6 it will net close to the same lift as your current TOPO 2.0 lift. same benefits but with a better dampened strut. do you plan on bringing back 2 spring rates again as well? i had your red coil 2.0 and liked the spring rate a lot.

BUT, the coil over idea sounds like it might even be the cats meow and trump the above set up. keep up the good work Van Compass, ill continue to wait to see what you come up with since i dont have a build date for my next van anyway
VC -
The bilstein with an 1" more travel and 5/8" higher perch will droop farther than stock strut, blue coil and camber spacer - Yes, the B6 will droop .25" further than the factory strut with our 3/4" camber spacer.

If you want ~ 1" of front lift and no CV issues use the stock strut and blue coil. The suspension will move to the stock location and no further angle will be put on the CVs. The camber will still be very close to correct.

If you want ~ 1.5" of front lift you can do the B6 and Blue coil. The suspension will droop out 1" more than factory. The CV starts to bind at 1 of additional droop. Camber will be +0.5 degrees or so.

If you want ~ 1.5" of lift you can use the B6, Blue coil and our yet to be released "no lift camber spacer" The suspension will droop out 1" more than factory. The CV starts to bind at 1 of additional droop. BUT many people are willing to do this to get the correct camber and benefits of the B6 strut. This option is still 3-6 months out.

If you want 2" of lift - Use our front Topo 2.0 kit with stock strut. This will let the suspension droop to 3/4" further than factory, CV will not be binding yet.
 

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Dogdude222, that is looking great! I see that and am no longer scared that I won't be able to go places (that I already go in my Subaru - but it's missing several van advantages)

Is your color Ingot Silver? Avalanche Gray? Or? It looks really nice.



I think you are saying that you are confident the VC is the better approach, but I'm not 100% sure so just wanted to check. Someday I may have a van to make these decisions about 🙃
Color is Ingot Silver. Avalanche grey is a sweet color, but after owning a lithium grey F150, I would never own another vehicle without metallic flake ever again. They show every imperfection in the clear coat and every chip, not to mention every spec of dirt.

I am confident that the VC approach is much simpler. But I am of the opinion that the QLift is the better approach overall and allows for potentially even more lift in the future. It maintains all the stock CV axle and control arm angles. That is why we paid 4x more to go with the QLift over VC.

Here is a photo with the KO2s in 255/70r16:

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That lift looks so good - and practical!

Glad I asked about it because I took you to mean the opposite on VC vs. Q (but wasn't sure).

Interesting to read your take on metallic vs. non-metallic. Appreciate it. I was thinking I wanted a non-metallic because I slightly prefer them visually; but also because I had the impression they were more durable and easier to repair and keep the panels matching. Well, maybe the solids are easier to repair in terms of actual body-shop work; but knowing they show swirls and scratches more gives me pause because that's the more common occurrence for me (narrow roads in the woods)
 

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Color is Ingot Silver. Avalanche grey is a sweet color, but after owning a lithium grey F150, I would never own another vehicle without metallic flake ever again. They show every imperfection in the clear coat and every chip, not to mention every spec of dirt.

I am confident that the VC approach is much simpler. But I am of the opinion that the QLift is the better approach overall and allows for potentially even more lift in the future. It maintains all the stock CV axle and control arm angles. That is why we paid 4x more to go with the QLift over VC.

Here is a photo with the KO2s in 255/70r16:

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That lift looks so good - and practical!

Glad I asked about it because I took you to mean the opposite on VC vs. Q (but wasn't sure).

Interesting to read your take on metallic vs. non-metallic. Appreciate it. I was thinking I wanted a non-metallic because I slightly prefer them visually; but also because I had the impression they were more durable and easier to repair and keep the panels matching. Well, maybe the solids are easier to repair in terms of actual body-shop work; but knowing they show swirls and scratches more gives me pause because that's the more common occurrence for me (narrow roads in the woods)
Quite the opposite actually. The more flat the color, the harder to match. Obviously metallic flake can vary in terms of flake amount and flake size, but if all there is is the base pigment, then it has to be absolutely perfect to match. I have seen some lithium grey F150's with toppers that appeared to be a completely different color. Match wasn't even close.
 

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Newberg Ford installed the lift, but yes there are spacers on top. Since the whole subframe moves down, they have to space the strut assembly down as well.
 

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This is a great thread. I really appreciate the commentary from @VanCompass.com. Your authenticity and transparency is commendable. I'm interested if you two have taken a look at the WeldTech designs kit (WTD - Ford Transit 2" AWD Suspension Lift Kit "Altitude" - WeldTec Designs) that looks to use a strut spacer, like yours, but also changes the track width through new LCAs.
We have looked at this. I don't see how the control arm can be lengthened much. Maybe 0.25" for camber correction. Anymore trackwidth will most likely pull the CV axle assembly apart. We are 100% positive the CV joints are binding when the suspension is fully extended. The increased suspension travel is a false claim as well. The strut travel sets the wheel travel. I would also stay away from heim joints on a unibody van. Heims tend to develop a little slop after a short period of time. They will transfer noise easily on a uni-body van.
 

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We have looked at this. I don't see how the control arm can be lengthened much. Maybe 0.25" for camber correction. Anymore trackwidth will most likely pull the CV axle assembly apart. We are 100% positive the CV joints are binding when the suspension is fully extended. The increased suspension travel is a false claim as well. The strut travel sets the wheel travel. I would also stay away from heim joints on a unibody van. Heims tend to develop a little slop after a shirt period of time. They will transfer noise easily on a uni-body van.
Thanks guys! Really appreciate the feedback.
 

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The only oddity I can report after the lift is that the turbo sounds much louder and more fluttery. I think with the subframe drop, there is a resonance effect in the tunnel area. Some people would pay for this sound, but I find it somewhat bothersome. I already have a 6.7 cummins for when I want to be heard. My fiance drove the van home and she didn't even notice it. I got in and pulled away and immediately noticed it, so YMMV.
Just wanted to follow up that I found the source of my noise this morning. I have an exhaust leak at my driver's side turbo flange where the exhaust was disconnected for the install. Newberg has been great about post purchase support and is working with my local dealer to sort out the issue. I think the effect is probably magnified by the relatively thin and puny steering shaft boot used with the Qlift. Compared to the two piece unit on a stock Transit, it is definitely going to transmit more sound.

As VC has pointed out, the approach of dropping the subframe is definitely more complex. With complexity comes greater risk for complications. At this point, I am still happy I went with the Q lift.
 

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I wanted to follow up here on a couple of issues with the Q lift. First of all, our local dealer attempted to fix the exhaust leak, which was a very painful experience mainly because they are Lithia. I still found a small leak afterwards, but perhaps all turbo flanges leak a bit when cold and pressurized. This morning I cut a piece of a rubber and gorilla taped it up from the bottom around the steering shaft and packed the cavity with grease before resecuring the boot from above. It was like a miracle. After several months of listening to this high pitched, fluttering, clicking exhaust/turbo sound, the cabin is quiet again! Just like our van of old. So, the thin, single layer steering shaft boot was primarily to blame. Quigley should really go to a two-layer steering shaft boot.

Second, after some discussion about CV axles and the downsides of all lifts on another thread, I wanted to follow up on a couple of issue raised by VC earlier in this thread:

With regards to the front driveshaft angle "issue" raised by VC. I crawled under just to look at mine and see if it had any signs of failure and how easy it would be replace. By the book, one is supposed to remove the subframe, exhaust, and transfer case to replace the driveshaft. However, it looks pretty easy to unbolt and remove. Even if you needed some axial play, I think by unbolting the differential from the side of the transmission, one could easily gain a bit of play. Access is quite easy. To my eye, there is very little angle to it at all. The boots looks great, and I think the risk of failure is low, especially compared to even the stock CV joints/boots let alone the CV angle on a VC kit. I have included some photos for reference here. You can see that my van also has some grease slung onto the transmission as well, but that is leftover factory grease coming out the end of the boot from a point distal to the clamp on the transfer case side. I can even milk some grease out of there. You can see in the photos that my boot is slightly wet appearing there. In fact, the failure point of the boot would actually be inside the metal housing of the driveshaft joint, so wouldn't likely sling any grease at all. Given this and the similarity in appearance to my van, I am extremely skeptical that the van pictured in VC's post actually had a torn driveshaft boot at all.

VC also states that the CV axles are at close to a bind at full droop. Given that the differential is significantly lower than stock, it seems like this is far more of an issue with the VC lift. Full droop is an uncommon scenario and when the van is just sitting there or going down the road, the CV angles look acceptable to me and not discernably different from before the lift. They appear dramatically less angled than the VC vans I have looked under. Clearly this issue would be worse if the differential was in the stock position as it is on a VC lift. I think it is clear that the short passenger CV axle, its angle, and the CV boot material is likely to be an issue for all AWD transits long term, but this particular point sure feels like the pot calling the kettle black.

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I wanted to follow up here on a couple of issues with the Q lift.
Thanks for doing this. Really helpful for fleshing out my understanding of the various pros and cons.

First of all, our local dealer attempted to fix the exhaust leak....I still found a small leak afterwards, but perhaps all turbo flanges leak a bit when cold and pressurized. This morning I cut a piece of a rubber and gorilla taped it up from the bottom around the steering shaft and packed the cavity with grease before resecuring the boot from above. It was like a miracle. After several months of listening to this high pitched, fluttering, clicking exhaust/turbo sound, the cabin is quiet again!... So, the thin, single layer steering shaft boot was primarily to blame. Quigley should really go to a two-layer steering shaft boot.
This might make me sound really dumb (no need to confirm), but how do the exhaust leak and steering shaft boot interact? It sounds like you had the exhaust leak mostly fixed but could still hear it, and now your self-improved steering boot has taken care of all of the noise. But how do they relate?

Also, anything to be learned about why the exhaust leak appeared during the Q-Lift install? A procedure that could be improved (or at least mentioned going in)?

My second question is this: I know you are not Quigley, but can you think of any reason why they'd be using a single layer (I think I've read slightly "thin") steering shaft boot? I mean, it's not like they are putting out a budget option. Is there some legit reason for the one they've chosen? Is there a better choice that's not homemade?
 

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This might make me sound really dumb (no need to confirm), but how do the exhaust leak and steering shaft boot interact? It sounds like you had the exhaust leak mostly fixed but could still hear it, and now your self-improved steering boot has taken care of all of the noise. But how do they relate?

Also, anything to be learned about why the exhaust leak appeared during the Q-Lift install? A procedure that could be improved (or at least mentioned going in)?

My second question is this: I know you are not Quigley, but can you think of any reason why they'd be using a single layer (I think I've read slightly "thin") steering shaft boot? I mean, it's not like they are putting out a budget option. Is there some legit reason for the one they've chosen? Is there a better choice that's not homemade?
I could hear the exhaust leak tick and turbo fluttering inside the cabin of the van. Whether that was just the thinner steering shaft boot or the new exhaust leak, I'm not sure, but it started immediately after the lift. Regardless, the noise was driving me nuts. My fiance couldn't hear it, and I'm guessing most people wouldn't think twice about it.

The leak appeared because they drop the Y pipe from the turbo flanges and didn't replace the gaskets. Newberg says they include new gaskets in every install now.

Quigley probably found a third party supplier for the steering shaft boot which fit their extension and thought it was good enough. Probably for most people it is. But it made driving the van very unpleasant for me. I sense a dramatic difference on the highway now. I isn't just that it is thin. There is probably not a great seal around the shaft itself. I'm guessing the sandwiched grease was the magic sauce to silencing the cabin noise. Hopefully Quigley is reading this post and will try to improve it. Most steering shaft boots are two layers or two pieces.
 

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Thanks so much for elaborating. I'm probably also one who would hear it and be annoyed so I appreciate knowing more about it. Good that Newbarg is replacing the gaskets now as a matter of course. I hope Quigley might think about improving the steering shaft boot.
 
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