Ford Transit USA Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am installing a simple 2000 watt pure sine inverter. I have the heavy duty alternator and dual batteries along with power seats. I will be connecting a 100AH AGM battery with a Keyline Iso-Pro140 isolator.



According to the BEMM it is acceptable to use the stud provided on the positive cable with the BMS Fuse.



I am using 1/0 wire and the ring terminals are to large to fit there. It's also a serious hassle to even get to that stud without removing the seat. What would be the difference in that verses connecting to the bus bar where the other end of that wire goes? It is much easier to access and there is plenty of room for the terminal.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
I guess you have not tried to access that bus bar yet, you will have to remove at least one Transit battery to do so.
Removing the seat makes it easier but it is not necessary to remove the seat to access the batteries, Or to remove one or both batteries.
There are You Tube video's from Ford and other people on how to remove the batteries Without removing the seat.


1/0 Cable seems kind of small, My 2,000 watt inverter requires 2/0 to 4/0 cable as per the manufacturer. (Magnum)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
For a high current draw item such as a 2k inverter, you want to connect 2/0 direct to battery for positive and negative terminals keeping the cabling as short as possible.


Attached are pictures of my 2/0 cables (pos and neg) routed into the battery box and connected to the van start batteries. I'm using a Samlex 300a fuse holder on the positive cable. I had to make an adapter bracket to fit the fuse holder cleanly and safely. I installed grommets going into the battery box. I also added teflon to the positive cable grommet for extra protection.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Just a battery related comment:

- Most AGM batteries struggle to discharge at a rate higher than 0.5 C.
- A few AGM batteries (example Lifeline / Northern ) can discharge at ~ 1 C

(0.5 C) x (100 amp-hr) = 50 amps, so around 500 watts

(1 C) x (100 amp-hr) = 100 amps, so around 1000 watts.

At normal idle, the alternator will make some, but not that much power.

There is a way to increase the engine idle speed to get into the range where more power draw is possible.

If you plan to actually start running at 1 - 2 kW, it is worth considering to have the engine running and idling at this higher rpm with a small auxiliary battery pack like that.

As an example, we normally would pair a 2 kW inverter with 4 each, lifeline 100 amp-hr batteries, wired in series for a 48 volt system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I am using 1/0 wire and the ring terminals are to large to fit there. It's also a serious hassle to even get to that stud without removing the seat. What would be the difference in that verses connecting to the bus bar where the other end of that wire goes? It is much easier to access and there is plenty of room for the terminal.
The lug fits if u grind a little off the sides. Make sure to clean burs and coat the exposed copper w/ dielectric or other suitable protectant. The batt is the best as it has less stuff btwn it and the batt. Others have conn to the buss bar you refer to.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top