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Discussion Starter #1
I'm getting started on my fresh water tank very soon. I have the tank under my bed and was looking at how I will run my lines. First up is my fresh water intake. I'm just running 1 1/4'' pvc from the tank to my slider so it will be easy to fill. Seems easy.

For the vent I thought it would be easy to run PEX because it's so flexible and I can run it up high enough and then bend it back down and run through the floor. When comparing 1/2'' pex to 1/2'' pvc I was surprised at how much smaller the ID of the PEX was. I could go to a larger size PEX but where it screws into the 1/2'' opening on the tank would still be a restriction. I'm undecided which way to go. What are others doing??

For my fresh water line I do plan to use PEX for all my runs. But it brings back the question of pipe size. The 1/2" pex is smaller then pvc. Do I go up a size in pex to make up for the difference.
 

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PEX is awesome. Why do they even bother making PVC pipes anymore?
 

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You do not need to run the fresh water air vent outside. In Sprinter build I used 3/8" tubing with a pneumatic valve exhaust muffler at the end. Terminated it about halfway up the rear slider door frame. Outlet from the tank was at the top and middle of the tank. If outlet is at the front you may get water surge with heavy braking, I will do the same in the Transit.

https://sprinter-source.com/forum/showpost.php?p=188051&postcount=2

I also fill the fresh water tank through the open slider door. In order to prevent water spillage I use an 90 degree radiator fill valve with a on/off valve.

https://sprinter-source.com/forum/showpost.php?p=188054&postcount=4
 

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I ended up using food grade vinyl hose as it's really flexible (more then PEX) and easy to work with.


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Discussion Starter #9
You do not need to run the fresh water air vent outside. In Sprinter build I used 3/8" tubing with a pneumatic valve exhaust muffler at the end. Terminated it about halfway up the rear slider door frame. Outlet from the tank was at the top and middle of the tank. If outlet is at the front you may get water surge with heavy braking, I will do the same in the Transit.

My vent is front corner so the worry about water sloshing out is always in my mind. I'll feel better venting it through the floor so I won't have to worry about worst case scenario.

I'll be working on parts of it this week so will give the PEX a look to see if I can make this job easier. Water will be my last major hurdle to get over before it becomes small projects and finishing work.

I do worry about the PVC cracking and becoming brittle with age. I would much rather build it for the long term and not have problems down the road.
 

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you got to love pex, it can freeze solid for days and still not leak when it thaws!
topic side direction:
I replaced my Mom's hot water lines with PEX a little while back; the 40-50 year old galvanized in her slab floor finally failed and plumber wanted $10,000 to tear up parts of the floor andpatch the breaks. I ran PEX up to the attic and down in the walls to the 3 wet walls in just a few hours, and cut and capped the old galvi coming out of the slab. I think I spent $150, and that included all the Sharkbite fittings; because I didn't want to solder on adapters and crimp everything. I only charged her $9800 ;)

That was the first time I used PEX extensively, other times it was as a patch in old earthquake addled houses, which also functioned as a dielectric union between copper and galvi. Houses here are riddled with a mish-mash of a century's worth of plumbing and electric technology and materials.

PEX is ideal for RVs and campervans.
 
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We use and recommend Nylobrade® Braid Reinforced Clear PVC NSF Tubing, Eldon James PVDF fittings, (both from US Plastic) and vibration resistant double pinch clamps (McMasterCarr). These can be frozen solid under pressure and won't leak when the water thaws.



Many vans are built using components and methods coming out of the Residential, RV and Camper realms and that's OK for some builds. We realize that a van goes more many miles in tougher conditions so they deserve higher quality engineered materials, components and systems.
 

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I used very nice brass PEX nipple fittings with reinforced food grade PVC hose (for flexibility) and hose clamps. All of these items are readily available here. My system is gravity fed (1 to 2 PSI) and uses Scepter military water cans for storage.

To get the 3/4" OD, 1/2" ID PVC on the 3/4" PEX fittings I used a heat gun and a bit of water for lubrication. The PVC fits the opening in the Scepter water can perfectly, once I reamed out the little plastic moulding ridges with a Forstner bit.
 

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I ran vinyl from my tank to my pump and 1/2" Pex to my angle stop and then my sink. I used vinyl for my vent and 1-1/4 fresh water tubing for my fill.

The vinyl at the pump stops a lot of the vibration from the pump.

If your tank fill and vent are on the side you should add a check valve to the fill and loop the vent or water will slosh out.

I modified my side fill tank and made it a top fill and also added a baffle. I gained 2 gals of capacity doing that. I also made a pickup tube for the outlet and can now get almost all of the 18 gals out.

I also added a 4" deck plate to the top and added a baffle.

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I also used vinyl.
It has an added benefit of being a little soft and expands with pressure acting like an expansion tank and reducing cycling of the water pump.
Also easy to repair or modify with standard tools and parts.
 
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