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2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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No, more like having a pipe bomb strapped to the bottom of your van. :)
Hadn't even /occurred/ to me that someone would leave it pressurized! 😬
Yikes. No-one do that! Dump the pressure after use! 💣
 

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I don’t think there’s really any reason to drain an air tank. Just not enough pressure or volume to do any damage. Even if the tank is punctured, air will just escape, it won’t explode.

My tank is in front of the spare, mayy put a shielding below and/or in front of it though just to protect it a bit.
 

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I don’t think there’s really any reason to drain an air tank. Just not enough pressure or volume to do any damage. Even if the tank is punctured, air will just escape, it won’t explode.

My tank is in front of the spare, mayy put a shielding below and/or in front of it though just to protect it a bit.
Ummm. No, they definitely can (and do) fail catastrophically. Maybe 2 gallons at 150 psi is only enough potential energy to slice off your arm and not cut your torso in half, but it'll still be gruesome.

Quick YouTube search:



 

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2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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I thought people kept it charged to be able to change the rear ride height on the fly.
...
At least with the Air Lift setup, there's a tiny pump with no tank. Works fine.

As far as using the tank to handle tires, the volume in there doesn't equal the kind of volume in tires, from what I have observed. I leave our tank disconnected unless I want to use it to blow-out the garage or whatever. The pump does it's job without a tank for tires and air-bags.
 

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2017 350 XL HD passenger
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774 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)
UPDATE:

OK now that I have some spare time between vacationing and what not I went ahead and brainstormed some mounting ideas. I wanted the compressor to go in a certain area, behind the rear driver's side wheels (dually, 350 HD is my model), and wanted it to be tucked up as close to the floor as possible. I used what I had laying around the garage including things I had left over from converting the van.

Firstly, I took some M12 stainless rivnuts and installed them into some existing holes of the subframe. You can see some of other holes in the pics below...there are many of them. I then took a battery box I had laying around and decided to use it as a 3 walled enclosure. I had to trim it alittle with a dremel (the side handles) in order to get it to tuck up within the rails. I do plan make a cover for the back side, probably out of corrugated plastic or something like that. I wanted this enclosure cause 1) the spray from the wheels is directly in the path of this mounting location and 2) pretty sure the compressor I choose to use (see 1st post) is not meant to get wet (although there aren't many electronics between the motor, power switch, breaker and thermal cutoff switch).
I used some Unistrut L brackets (super thick metal), some 6 inch Unistrut straight 4-hole brackets and 1/4" plate of aluminum. The compressor is mounted to the aluminum plate using the rubber bushings it came with but I removed the base plate/tray that came with the compressor since I found it too flimsy for this application. the 1/4" aluminum plate is not going anywhere. I then mounted the plate to the L brackets/straight Unistrut brackets through the battery box. Everything is pretty tight as is. I used some blue loctite on the threads as well as lock-nuts.
I then mounted the entire assembly to the rivnuts using M12 bolts. These bolts I used red loctite.
I think I'm going to add a metal strapping just as a backup in case the rivnuts fail or the brackets bend? (highly unlikely, they are stout).
Here are some pictures of today's work.

Automotive exterior Motor vehicle Trunk Bumper Gas


Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Hood


Grey Bumper Fixture Wood Gas

Next phase though is mounting the air outlet 4-way brass block. In this block I have installed a thermal cut-off switch and a 110 psi blow-off valve just as backups/safety. Also, the outlet will lead to the rear bumper where I'll mount a female sae connector to use a hose as well as a keyswitch to act as the power switch.
 

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Here's some photos of my install maybe it will be helpful to future readers. I keep a Viair 450P permanently under the swivel base of the passenger seat.

Hood Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive exterior Steering wheel


To install: 1) Remove seat and jack cradle 2) add an Andersen powerpole connector 3) make a retainer jig that fits over the cradle bolts 4) drop in the compressor 5) reinstall the seat

Asphalt Cable Road surface Race track Electrical wiring


I built an extension cord that goes from the compressor to an Anderson connector on the CCP. The cord is made from 10 gauge wire and an inline 40 amp fuse.

Bumper Electrical wiring Cable Gas Motor vehicle


To use the compressor, pull out the airhose pigtail and plug into 12V power.

This setup works great to air-up K02 tires for off-road travel. We use a pressure regulator for bike tires and water tank.

I think you would want a tank only if you need to run air tools(?)
 

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Yea I was thinking of going basically the opposite from others... since air tools were a "nice-to-have" and not a requirement, I was thinking of a nice compressor permanently installed (like ARB twin), and then bring along a separate reservoir when I plan to need it (e.g. Amazon.com). The added benefit is deliberately lugging the tank around will allow me to casually inspect it on every use, drain the condensation, etc.. I can easily see myself neglecting the tank if it were permanently under-mounted, but that's just me.
 
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2017 350 XL HD passenger
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Small update:

After trying to mess with Type Q or Nitto type fittings and M12 x1.0 to npt adapters, I decided to dissemble the compressor and retap the outlet pipe to NPT thread. Added a simple elbow and then the 4 port manifold with other various bits. It doesn't leak and fits nicely within the box so I'm happy. Next is to fab a cover of sorts.

Hood Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive design Automotive tire


Hood Motor vehicle Bumper Electrical wiring Automotive exterior
 

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2017 350 XL HD passenger
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
OK here's major update:

Had time to make the install permanent. Like I stated above, I used a plastic battery box I had laying around (I'm trying to find the "group" number for the box and when I find it, I'll update this post) to make a housing for compressor. I then used 3/16" corrugated plastic for the "cover" side of the enclosure. For the actual mounting, I installed some M12 rivnuts into existing holes of the frame. I then used unistrut heavy duty brackets with a 1/4" alumn plate (inside the enclosure) to make a frame of sorts to which the compressor and battery box mount to. The brackets then mount to the van frame using M12 bolts. For a last ditch "safety" fail, I used some metal strapping and bolted to another rivnut in case the main rivnuts fail. Initial observations are that the structure is very strong and will not be going anyway...but only time will tell.

I then ran a 6' 3/8 air hose, main power wiring and switch wiring along side the rail terminating at the rear bumper, center area. I used a scrap black anodized right angle bracket I had to mount a thru-hull npt fiting and a motorcycle ignition switch. The thru-hull npt air fitting was used to install an ARB air hose quick connect. The motorcycle ignition allows me to use a key to turn on/off the compressor. Here are some pics:

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle

Green Plant Automotive tire Terrestrial plant Grass

Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Electrical wiring
Plant Automotive tire Green Motor vehicle Automotive lighting
Plant Vehicle Grass Automotive exterior Automotive tire



I still need to connect the main power wiring and fuse/breaker to make the install 100%. I'm happy with it so far tho.

What do you think?
 

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Yea I was thinking of going basically the opposite from others... since air tools were a "nice-to-have" and not a requirement, I was thinking of a nice compressor permanently installed (like ARB twin), and then bring along a separate reservoir when I plan to need it (e.g. Amazon.com). The added benefit is deliberately lugging the tank around will allow me to casually inspect it on every use, drain the condensation, etc.. I can easily see myself neglecting the tank if it were permanently under-mounted, but that's just me.
I went one step further. Bought a 120 volt AC portable compressor. I move the tank and compressor in/out of the van. When out of the van I can also use it since it is one unit.

My 1000 watt house inverter runs the 1/2 hp air compressor. No installation. No air piping. No high amperage DC wiring required. Lower air compressor cost.
 

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2017 350 XL HD passenger
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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Update:

INSTALL COMPLETED!

Well, its done! Yay. Works great, as expected. The bonus addition was the Anderson Power connector/port. I 3D printed a neat STL I found on thingiverse that allows for the connector to be flush mounted. Figured it might be good to have it back there if I ever want to power some high power devices.

Anyway pics & a vid FTW!
Electrical wiring Cable Gas Electrical supply Audio equipment

Gas Jewellery Automotive tire Electrical wiring Electric blue

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Automotive lighting Bumper


 

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"Terrapin Station Wagon" aka "VanTerp" 2020 AWD LH
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I just installed and have been using one of the new VIAIR Bike compressors. TLC Compressors | VIAIR® Bike. Geared specifically towards bike tire inflation but also capable of airing full size van tires. I bike a lot, and in 30+ years of driving forest roads to trailheads, I've never aired my tires down. If I was rock-crawling and airing up/down regularly this would not be the right compressor. (But it can do it in a pinch, just not super fast.)

I got the TLC Plus, which is the 2nd smallest/cheapest. No tank, but uses the 30ft hose to 'store' enough air to mount a tubeless mt bike tire. I was skeptical but it works. Hose long enough to reach all 4 van tires too.

It comes with the parts to hard-wire it in, which is what I did, directly the CCP. My requirement was that it needed to be at the ready without unpackaging, plugging it, etc. Otherwise just use an old manual pump. It fit perfectly on the slider step under the ammo can that holds my water jug. The air hose feeds up into the bottom of the ammo can and the coiled hose stores neatly inside. Also comes with a bike-specific filler with gauge and bleeder valve to get the pressure just right.

So it meets my needs: bike tires, van tires in emergency, compact, wired and ready to go, simple install, inexpensive.

Tcacshy - your set up is next level. Nice work!
Tire Wheel Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive tire
 

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2017 350 XL HD passenger
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I just installed and have been using one of the new VIAIR Bike compressors. TLC Compressors | VIAIR® Bike. Geared specifically towards bike tire inflation but also capable of airing full size van tires. I bike a lot, and in 30+ years of driving forest roads to trailheads, I've never aired my tires down. If I was rock-crawling and airing up/down regularly this would not be the right compressor. (But it can do it in a pinch, just not super fast.)

I got the TLC Plus, which is the 2nd smallest/cheapest. No tank, but uses the 30ft hose to 'store' enough air to mount a tubeless mt bike tire. I was skeptical but it works. Hose long enough to reach all 4 van tires too.

It comes with the parts to hard-wire it in, which is what I did, directly the CCP. My requirement was that it needed to be at the ready without unpackaging, plugging it, etc. Otherwise just use an old manual pump. It fit perfectly on the slider step under the ammo can that holds my water jug. The air hose feeds up into the bottom of the ammo can and the coiled hose stores neatly inside. Also comes with a bike-specific filler with gauge and bleeder valve to get the pressure just right.

So it meets my needs: bike tires, van tires in emergency, compact, wired and ready to go, simple install, inexpensive.

Tcacshy - your set up is next level. Nice work!
View attachment 178542
You found a nice little spot for it there. Good work
 
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