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Discussion Starter #1
My used Transit 250 has an aftermarket padded plastic floor and shelving system. I want to install two horizontal e-tracks on the floor.,

Can someone give me the measurements center to center of the ridges in the floor of the cargo area, as mine are covered?

I'm hoping to center my 5" wide e-tracks on them and use e-track self-tapping screws to attach them.

Thanks.
 

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Almost impossible to answer- the ridges/valleys are not consistent throughout the van.
Personally I wouldn't trust self tapping screws to hold a motorcycle either..especially in a crash.
I'd definitely want some of them at least to be through bolted.
 

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Go to a dealer and measure the floor of a new cargo van of your length...... mine is a passenger wagon and the aluminum floor I have in has the holes cut out for the seat rails. I attach my motorcycle to the factory seat rails and D-Rings that I installed in the factory nuts behind the side panels which are all there. I went to a dealer and measured the D-Rings in a cargo van to find them and allowed for the extra height on the wagon floor.
 

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Tek Screws. There are 100's of versions made by Tek. Some designed for this application.

I went through an engineering example and found those metal piecing self-tapping screws (1/4" body) could hold something like 1,500 pounds in shear.

You need every hole filled, solid metal to metal connection, but those screws were strong than the cargo track! 40 of them on one track, and it isn't going anywhere!

A 400-pound motorcycle will be 8000 pounds in a 20g crash.

Get an 870 Pound Fat Boy (appropriate name!), and we are looking at 17,000 forces during a 20g head-on collision. Those cargo tie points are good for 3,500-pound ratings, so six straps minimum on that motorcycle!

Caveat: Use the correct screws (you can order them from home depot 100 pcs was around $8.00).
 

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I went through an engineering example and found those metal piecing self-tapping screws (1/4" body) could hold something like 1,500 pounds in shear.
What about forces other than shear? A crash will likely involve some tension force vectors too. Especially when holding down a relatively tall item like a motorcycle. Never mind a rollover. He's also not having metal to metal contact. He's going through a layer of plastic floor and padding (he didn't say thickness). Although 40 of anything might be good enough. And a lot of people here and with factory RVs are carrying around heavy items that may or may not be adequately secured according to engineering calculations.
 

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@Eiko

Correct, OP would have to cut around the mat and mount directly to the metal floor for strength. I do hope OP understands the forces involved and why those Ford "D" Rings and mounts are good straping points.

klp shows the way I like with metal to metal, then built the floor up around the seat mounting brackets.

http://fastening-solutions.itwbuildex.com/item/teks-steel-to-steel-self-drilling-screws-3/teks-4-steel-to-steel-self-drilling-screws/1088000-4

Teks #4 #12-24 tpi x 7/8" long

Shear Stress 2,100 lb

Tensile Strength
3,020 lb
 

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So the screw may be 2100 shear and 3020 tensile but how do you know what the thin floor metal will take?
 

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OK, good advise, I will use a mixture of screws and nut & bolts
Use stainless steel fasteners and spray the underside with a rubberized undercoating. I used nuts and bolts where ever possible. Personally I wouldn't put E-track on top of the OEM floor mat. I haul freight, much on pallets so my E-track is recessed slightly below my floor. Easy to slide pallets in and out.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Quote:
Correct, OP would have to cut around the mat and mount directly to the metal floor for strength. I do hope OP understands the forces involved and why those Ford "D" Rings and mounts are good straping points.

klp shows the way I like with metal to metal, then built the floor up around the seat mounting brackets.

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All good info, and thanks! The plan is to use the e-track to mount a Pingle-brand wheel chock, but still use the factory rings to hold bike upright at the handlebars with ratchet straps. In the past I had a trailer and tow vehicle, and only used two straps at the handlebars, and then one or two at the swingarm going forward to stop the bike from "walking" left-to-right at the rear. Now, with the bike inside, I see your point about it coming forward - this vehicle came with a Ranger-brand bulkhead, but I don't want to rely on just that. So, I'll add some additional straps - fortunately, it's only a 300 lb Yamaha WR250R!

Also, I will look into cutting out the plastic cover, which has about 1/4" of what looks like car insulation under it so I can mount metal-to-metal.
Will also look into using nuts and bolts where possible. Thanks again for all the great feedback, much appreciated!!!
 

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So the screw may be 2100 shear and 3020 tensile but how do you know what the thin floor metal will take?
Great question.

If you have a 1000 pounds load, 20g head on collision, and two of those tracks held down by 52 screws each (4' second of track, screws are every four inches, both sides of track) I suspect track will reamin attached to 19 gauge sheet metal (0.0418) steel. Screws should have a minimum of three threads of engagement. So 3/24 or 0.125" for full rating. So ideal would the tracks to cover both sides of the box frame under the van to penetrate double thickness sheet metal.

With valleys and floors on the van, I'd stick with using nuts and bolts, large washers under the floor to prevent pull though.
 

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Never mind the screws..... I've drilled through the floor, there's not much there. So this calls for a plate. I would start on the UNDER side, find good spots to put plates and then drill up from there. Bolt through.......

Roll overs are not very likely. Head ons with other vehicles, guard rails or trees much more so. The forces are significant.
 

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I would recommend removing the vinyl floor and using wood sheeting to build up the floor flush w/ the ridges and then drilling through and putting a plate on the underside as well.

Sure it's slightly overkill but I wouldn't do it any other way. You could also look at switching to L-Track. That is only 1.20" wide and should fit between.
 

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Roll overs are not very likely.
That's what I thought until 12/13/17 when my van was broadsided by a full size pickup traveling an estimated 45mph- we were doing 65 on a divided 4 lane. Van slid almost 200 ft on its side before going over an embankment.
Gave me a whole new perspective on securing contents- saw 1000lb breaking strength straps snap like nothing.
I was extremely glad I did not have my usual motorcycle and gas cans with me....
 

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Roll overs are not very likely. Head ons with other vehicles, guard rails or trees much more so.
True that the other types of crashes are more likely. I don't have numbers but wouldn't say "rollovers are not very likely". NHTSA says SUVs have a higher rate of rollovers as compared to cars and we have the same high CG as SUVs, more so my high roof and people who have stuff on their roofs. Cars start sliding sideways and that's usually about it unless they high side on a curb or some such. SUV's start sliding sideways and often promptly flip. (Ignore that Transit drifting video!).

One example is https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=13&v=mnGmIEzayQM I bet a car getting hit from behind off center like that would just slide.
 

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Serious accidents are not likely, purely statistically speaking. Traffic deaths in the US are averaging about 1 per 100 million miles traveled by road.

Cut out alcohol and excessive speed and your odds go down even more.

Are we more likely to roll than a passenger car once the hokey pokey starts? Yes. Purely statistically speaking.

Experiencing a rollover in ANYTHING is not very likely, notwithstanding the fact that it happened to someone here.

I am attaching things pretty decently back there. I'll be able to withstand a mild crash without anything coming loose. I definitely would make sure a motorcycle was properly secured as it would only take a mild crash to get it moving. In a serious crash all bets are off, and all the math here is entertaining but not too relevant.

My seatbelts at work are rated to 50g's. Yeah right.
 

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We need a survey:

Who had rolled a vehicle?
Who has had a head-on collision?
Who has flip a car end to end?

If anyone answers yes, I'd love to see things you do differently.

Oh, me YES to all three. SCCA Pro Rally and NARA (David Ash, grrrrr) Days. I was wearing a helmet during most of the times I rolled, but remember a pair of pliers hitting me in the head during one such event. Another time I managed a 6" slice down my arm (ends over end rolls, to this day, I don't know how I cut myself, but we all had EMT training so compression, duct tape, let the docs stitch me up later.

Admitted I was racing off-road when those events happened, and thankfully had that knowledge during some hairy events (rear wheel blowouts) and took it nice an slow to recover.

I love the idea of a partition wall to keep things from hitting me but
will have some very secure storage (heavier the item the lower is it stored!). A light weight jacket, Tshirts, socks, underwear are not an issue. One 16oz can of split pea soup can be deadly. Remember more people have been killed by ball-peen hammers than other means (odd trivia!). Stow those hammers securely!
 
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