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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
G

Great work on this review. I have the van compass topo 2.0 and bilstien struts on my 2wd 2020 transit. Love the look and the ability to add larger tires (265/75/16) but agree I don’t like the short travel when dropping down (over a hump or into a ditch). Feels a bit harsh and can’t imagine it’s the best for the van. I’ve been considering just biting the bullet and see if I can order a couple sets of the foes lower arms and installing one and having a back up set for later on. The van compass lift doesn’t give me the off road feeling I was hoping for with the understanding it’s a on-road tin can of a van…. I’m not looking for tons of articulation as I’m pretty sure the van would just twist be all outta wack in no time… what do you think of adding the foes lower arms to the van compass components?
I don’t personally think it’s a good idea. They don’t properly solve the bushing issue, still over extend the ball joint, and if you have bushing issues down the line, you have to buy their control arms. The only solution is a whole new designed lower control arm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
The solution for getting the strut back into the knuckle is to compress it with a jack and bind it with high-strength nylon webbing, like that used for rock climbing, prior to removing it like @TahoeTransit did here: Larger tires, 3” lift kit
No thanks, I cho
The solution for getting the strut back into the knuckle is to compress it with a jack and bind it with high-strength nylon webbing, like that used for rock climbing, prior to removing it like @TahoeTransit did here: Larger tires, 3” lift kit
158589
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
This is why I am going to custom make front lower control arms.
I found that I can order just the factory bushings and if I use the cups from the factory arms I can either do tube or boxed with extension and bend to let me get the right angles.
My Quadvan conversion has a lift built into the new spindle and I want to use a strut space with either adjustment built in or adjustable. Also it would be nice if I can make the control arms adjustable for caster/camber.
I have seen the cut/welded Foes controls arms but I want something stronger for my van.
I want to build my own control arms too. I think this is the best solution. Something that can put the bushings and ball joints back in their factory neutral positions and something that will allow for caster adjustment
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
I just did a Traxda adjustable strut mount, VanCompass red coils and Bilstein B6s on my Quigley. It was good for about another inch over stock Quigley, so about 3". Good so far and makes 33's look factory-ish. I'll post a pic when I get a chance.
did you install it yourself? I want to know all the details!
 

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I had never heard of thee guys before. That is the exact solution that I was dreaming up
I love how much detail you explained all the options available for the Transit. I have the WeldTec Designs Lift kit on my van, at the same time I added the Bilstein B6 shocks in the front. I plan on doing more with this van in the future, and look forward to sharing it with everyone. The lift has been great so far and there was trimming necessary to fit the 265x70x17 tires. If you have any questions please let me know.
Automotive parking light Tire Wheel Sky Vehicle
 

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I love how much detail you explained all the options available for the Transit. I have the WeldTec Designs Lift kit on my van, at the same time I added the Bilstein B6 shocks in the front. I plan on doing more with this van in the future, and look forward to sharing it with everyone. The lift has been great so far and there was trimming necessary to fit the 265x70x17 tires. If you have any questions please let me know. View attachment 159138
with the bilstein shock, did you get more then 2'' lift total?
 

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The Bilstein strut adds 5/8” more lift due to the coil bucket being welded on higher.
 

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I don’t personally think it’s a good idea. They don’t properly solve the bushing issue, still over extend the ball joint, and if you have bushing issues down the line, you have to buy their control arms. The only solution is a whole new designed lower control arm.
Update: Well, bit the bullet and bought weldtech’s new front lift kit which includes new custom built beefy lengthened lower control arms with heim joints. Excited to see how this system improves the harsh ride.
 

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2018 Ford Transit 250 MR Cargo ECO
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Is it possible these are over engineered and too expensive solutions?

Why not just get hub extenders to make your axle wide enough so that big tires do not hit the body?

Then just put the biggest scariest tires on it that you can find?

You should not have to change anything else, except maybe the axle ratios.

Have you noticed those weird hubcaps some folks put on little cars that stick out like a foot from the tire and looks like whirling knives? If those are legal the above should be too.
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Is it possible these are over engineered and too expensive solutions?

Why not just get hub extenders to make your axle wide enough so that big tires do not hit the body?

Then just put the biggest scariest tires on it that you can find?

You should not have to change anything else, except maybe the axle ratios.

Have you noticed those weird hubcaps some folks put on little cars that stick out like a foot from the tire and looks like whirling knives? If those are legal the above should be too.
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Well I am going to assume you are joking but just in case someone takes you serious I will point out why wheel spacers would be a really really bad idea.
1) you want the center of the wheel to be as INLINE with the wheel bearing as possible, otherwise the lever action forces would cause breakage and rapid wear.
2) Many states have legal issues on how far out a tire can stick out and not require a fender flare and mud flap (and there are no really good fender flare options
3) Do it right or don't do it at all.
 

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Hi everyone, I’m a certified mechanic, a Ford transit owner, and I’m frustrated with the available lift kit options. I’ve installed a lift kit in my van, but having the front end apart, I’ve discovered some things I want to discuss.

So, here’s a basic run down of the available kits, the problemsI experienced with my traxda lift and the issues I see with the rest of what’s available.

Vancompass has two lift kits. The Subframe drop idea is a crazy amount of work, but gives you perfect geometry. However you gain no effective clearance under the subframe unless you run bigger tires. You’ve merely lifted the van body higher.

Their second lift style is better. 3/4 inch strut spacer, plus a 1 and 1/4 inch lift from a new coil spring. Add those numbers together, you have 2 inches. Then you can also install a bilstein strut, and have a little more.

The problem with their second style of lift, is that struts have a maximum extension. These are arbitrary numbers, but imagine if you measured the strut from the top to the bottom, and it was 24 inches tall. That’s the maximum extension. When the strut is fully compressed, it’s 16”. So you have 8 inches of travel. When the weight of the vehicle is on the strut, it’s compressed somewhere in the middle of the travel.
So you have 4 inches up travel, and 4 inches down. When you add a coil spring that adds 1 and 1/4” to the height, what you’ve done is change where the mid point of the strut is. So you now have 5 and 1/4 inches of upward travel (wheel being pushed up into the fender by the road) but you only have 2 and 3/4” of downward travel. So if your wheel has to drop down into something, it is now has limited downward travel and you fully extend the suspension under a huge amount of negative load. This is really not good for the internal valving inside the strut and gives you a ride that feels like your being pulled back to the earth.

Now the traxda lift actually gives the van the best lift. “Technically” It pushes the van up in the air, adds height under the front crossmember, and keeps the strut at its factory middle. 4 inches up and 4 inches down. The problem is, actually getting everything back together. To put the 2 inch strut spacer on top of the strut, you have to remove the strut from the knuckle. It comes apart really easily, then you bolt the strut spacer on top, and stick it all back together. But the strut won’t go back into the knuckle, no matter how hard you try. The angles, because of adding 2 inches, are to great to overcome, and the strut won’t drop into the hole in the knuckle. So then I undid the ball joint, which allowed me to remove the knuckle from the lower control arm, and gave me the clearance to get the knuckle and strut back together. But then the angles were too extreme to get the ball joint back into the lower control arm..... arrrrrgggg. I got it back together, but had to fix the threads on the lower ball joint. Annoying.

Van compass only used a 3/4 inch spacer, and that is what would allow you to get it back together really easily. Remember that the strut has the same maximum extension no matter what. So that means, you’re only fighting 3/4 inch instead of 2 inch. For the sake of installing a lift, that’s why the van compass lift is better. You are not twisting and torquing on everything, to get it back together.

Foes manufacturing, their lift has the 2” spacer, but it has a modified factory control arm. Because the new lower control arm makes up for the angles of everything, the ball joint slips right in. This is the best solution, but very expensive for what you are getting and if you need new control arm bushings down the road, you have to buy new control arms... this is expensive. So that makes it the worst lift. Repairability is super important. You wouldn’t want to be on a trip, only to find out you need new lower control arms, and the factory ones are all that are available.

What I think the solution is.
1)Keep the factory strut and spring together
2) use a 2” space with camber adjustment
3) make a control arm with replaceable bushings, that deals with the angles that are at their maximums.

Anyways, I’d appreciate peoples thoughts.
Any other people who installed their lift by themselves, I’d love to hear of your experience.
Yes i have installed the topo 2.0 lift with Bilstien b6 all around and the rear leaf pack on my 2016 150 and ran into all those same front end issues especially the dreaded camber one. Had to do some fabrication on the lower control arms by adding 1 1/2" to the length also re-angle the rear bushing so it is level at ride Height plus Mcbay adjustable ball joints [ EBAY] for more accurate caster and camber adjustments also tie rod ends from 1999 2003 f150 4x4 [AMAZON] that are longer and the same thread pitch and tapper as the transit and add 1 additional steering stop to each side [FORD] of the steering rack.
 

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