Ford Transit USA Forum banner

141 - 160 of 169 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #141
The S1000RR has some performance potential. This is a street-legal BMW S1000RR (muffled, rear view mirrors, fully-functional street lighting, horn, license plate, street-legal treaded tires, turn signals, everything) using a 100% stock engine on gasoline. No wheelie bar, no drag slick, no air shifter, no lock-up clutch, no turbo, no nitrous, and no supercharger. It ran an 8.44 at 161.71 mph on the quarter mile:


This is quicker and faster than the Harley-Davidson Dreamin' Beagle Flatulator too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #142
Same rider, different street-legal BMW S1000RR (muffled, rear view mirrors, fully-functional street lighting, horn, license plate, street-legal treaded tires, turn signals, everything) using a 100% stock engine on gasoline. No wheelie bar, no drag slick, no air shifter, no lock-up clutch, no turbo, no nitrous, and no supercharger. 8.47 quarter mile with a terminal velocity in excess of 163 mph:


I'm seeing a pattern here. This too, would be quicker and faster than the Dreamin' Beagle Flatulator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,558 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
The S1000RR has some performance potential. This is a street-legal BMW S1000RR (muffled, rear view mirrors, fully-functional street lighting, horn, license plate, street-legal treaded tires, turn signals, everything) using a 100% stock engine on gasoline. No wheelie bar, no drag slick, no air shifter, no lock-up clutch, no turbo, no nitrous, and no supercharger. It ran an 8.44 at 161.71 mph on the quarter mile:
Same rider, different street-legal BMW S1000RR (muffled, rear view mirrors, fully-functional street lighting, horn, license plate, street-legal treaded tires, turn signals, everything) using a 100% stock engine on gasoline. No wheelie bar, no drag slick, no air shifter, no lock-up clutch, no turbo, no nitrous, and no supercharger. 8.47 quarter mile with a terminal velocity in excess of 163 mph:

I'm seeing a pattern here. This too, would be quicker and faster than the Dreamin' Beagle Flatulator.
Quick shifter is almost as good as an air shifter but that is a good time, crazy what an extended swingarm does for you. I remember back in 1999 when the ZX9 broke the 10 second barrier and now look at what you can do. The S1000RR basically does have a wheelie bar - you can electronically control against wheelies. Not sure if the he was using that feature or not in those runs but, either way - guys on those bikes are like GT-R drivers. All the electronic assists for those who don't want to learn the hard way. To each their own - I prefer to rev match and drive for myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #148
Quick shifter is almost as good as an air shifter but that is a good time, crazy what an extended swingarm does for you. I remember back in 1999 when the ZX9 broke the 10 second barrier and now look at what you can do. The S1000RR basically does have a wheelie bar - you can electronically control against wheelies. Not sure if the he was using that feature or not in those runs but, either way - guys on those bikes are like GT-R drivers. All the electronic assists for those who don't want to learn the hard way. To each their own - I prefer to rev match and drive for myself.
Yes, it is amazing how much motorcycles have improved (except for Harley-Davidsons).

The anti-wheelie feature contained within the suite of electronic rider aids typical of today's modern sporting motorcycles, does not perform the same function as a wheelie bar. Anti-wheelie kills power and/or applies the rear brake, whereas a wheelie bar allows full power at all times. This is especially relevant at speeds up to the point that a particular motorcycle is wheelie-limited (the speed below which opening the throttle all the way with the clutch all the way out will cause a wheelie). With most open-class sporting motorcycles of around 55" wheelbase, this speed is generally around the top of second gear. Most open-class Supersports are geared for 100 mph or more in first gear, so a race start typically involves launching from about 8,000 rpm, locking the throttle open, and sliding the clutch all the way through first gear. If you can make it to the top of first gear with the front wheel no more than an inch or two off the pavement at around 100 mph or so, you can usually keep the throttle open and leave the clutch all the way out from then on. It may not land the front wheel until you shift into third, but if the rider's body position is good, the front tire won't climb to the point of having to abort the pass.

And air shifters are quicker than electronic quick-shifters. With an air shifter, you can leave your feet dragging on the ground, even as you are upshifting with your left thumb using the air shifter. With an electronic quick-shifter, you have to be able to get your left foot up to the shifter by the top of first gear, which raises the motorcycle/rider's center of gravity to the point that it may delay getting the clutch out as quickly as you would otherwise, and it can also cause second-gear wheelies to progress to the point that you have to abort the pass.

Rev-matching is something that is done on downshifts, not upshifts.

My current motorcycle has a full suite of electronic rider aids (in addition to a slipper clutch), but I use them to tailor the motorcycle to my own personal preferences. Things like the ride-by-wire throttle's programmable throttle sensitivity, programmable rate of throttle opening, and programmable engine compression braking. I also occasionally use the electronic rider aids to clean up after me when something unusual happens. And I use them to preserve my rear tire life (using the traction control). But I know how to ride- I do not "lay" on the electronic rider aids. I do not rely on electronic rider aids as a crutch for not knowing how to ride. The slipper clutch, in and of itself, is a godsend- when things get a little busy on corner entry, I can snap off as many downshifts as I need, and just throw the clutch away. I get just a little squirm from the rear tire, with no hopping or chattering to upset the chassis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #149 (Edited)
Well, I think it's close enough to 6,000 views, to share this gem:

https://realmoney.thestreet.com/articles/06/30/2018/harley-davidson-was-trouble-long-current-trade-issues

Harley-Davidson can't produce failure fast enough to catch up.

They could have thrown themselves on the mercy of Erik Buell, instead of killing the wrong company.

They could have seen that the XR1200X was the direction that they needed to take.

They could have abandoned the posers, and pursued the riders.

But instead, they have chosen to fail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
OP since you mentioned it you gotta come clean - what do you ride? I would guess Duc but since you posted Beemer videos I am leaning towards that.



In case you are curious, Aprilia makes the finest open class bikes.


Edit - due to the extreme technical nature of your responses I am going with BMW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #153 (Edited)
OP since you mentioned it you gotta come clean - what do you ride? I would guess Duc but since you posted Beemer videos I am leaning towards that.



In case you are curious, Aprilia makes the finest open class bikes.


Edit - due to the extreme technical nature of your responses I am going with BMW.
Aprilia makes great motorcycles. So does BMW...and so does Ducati...and so do many other companies (other than Harley-Davidson).

I have a number of motorcycles, but I think my favorite right now is my MV Agusta F3 800, in the proper red over Ago silver livery. We toured the factory, located on the shores of Lake Varese in northern Italy, where they are hand-built, before we purchased it. It is the last motorcycle designed by the late Massimo Tamburini ("the Michelangelo of motorcycles"). It handles better than any motorcycle I've ever ridden, weighs 50 pounds less than my Supersport R1, is just impossibly beautiful from any angle, and is as exotic as any Ferrari- MV Agusta makes Ducati seem like Honda by comparison.

381 pounds. 148 horsepower. Chrome-moly tubular trellis frame. Single-sided swingarm. 54" wheelbase. 23.6 degrees of rake. 3.89" of trail. Triple-adjustable suspension. Brembo Monobloc radial-mount brakes with dual 320mm cross-drilled floating rotors. Pirelli Rosso Corsa track day tires. 6-speed close-ratio cassette transmission with slipper clutch and electronic quick shifter. 13,500 rpm titanium-valve reverse-rotation 798cc triple with ram air, six injectors (three in the throttle bodies, and three "shower" injectors), direct ignition, and ride-by-wire throttle. Titanium pipe-organ exhaust. Programmable race ABS. Programmable traction control, with eight selectable levels of intervention. Four selectable engine maps, including one custom map. Programmable throttle sensitivity. Programmable rate of throttle opening. Programmable engine compression braking (it can jack the center throttle plate open on decal, to enter corners like a 2-stroke).

And ironically, Harley-Davidson motorcycles are a lot more Japanese than mine.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #154
This is MV Agusta's philosophy when it comes to building motorcycles:


We were told during our factory tour, that every single engine goes on the engine dyno, full throttle, to redline. And then every single motorcycle goes on a chassis dyno. They are located not too far from Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati, Pagani, and Ducati...so we toured them too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
So GT owns an MV built in the Harley years?


Almost counts as owning one...


:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #157 (Edited)
So GT owns an MV built in the Harley years?


Almost counts as owning one...


:)
Lol, no.

MV Agusta has had many owners in it's 70+ year history. In 2008, two months before the market crash, Harley spent 109 million dollars on it. In 2010, two years later, they sold it back to the Castiglioni family for about one dollar.

The F3 800 came years afterwards, long after MV Agusta was back under Italian ownership.

Edited: I found a picture of my bike:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
I think ducatis are awesome but unreliable or should I say maintenance heavy. Might not matter for some, but I love bulletproof Japanese
 
141 - 160 of 169 Posts
Top