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Minimal workspace setup needed for better precision cuts

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Hi all. I'm very slowing progressing through my build, but one thing I think holding me back is that my tools are just mediocre, and I have a hard time (at times) making precision cut on things like plywood, luan, etc (and soon 80/20).

I also don't want to spend a bunch right now on more workspace stuff if I can avoid it.

So my question is: what do you think are the bare minimum tools helpers I could acquire to help improve my overall building process? By helpers, I mean things like tables, clamps, guides etc.

What I'm primarily using is a plunge saw, jigsaw and dremel. I have 1 plunge guide rail that I've been using and it's worked well. I have virtually no table to cut on (no work bench etc), so I'm using 2 cheap saw horses.

Anyway, just wondering what else you might suggest. And in particular I'm hoping to just find a way to improve the stability when making angle cuts. I imagine the response is a better work bench?
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Here's a pic of the table I made for a 12" miter saw. If I was building for space and utility, I would leave off the right-side extension and make the left-side extension 20" wide and 36" long. This "table" area would get a removable fence to use as a flat surface. Add the fence and you get stable cuts on the chop saw. The chop saw is screwed down on 4 corners into the 2 x 2 base rails. Good luck.
Wood Floor Table Flooring Machine tool
 

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few things that made a huge difference in plywood cuts for me;
making a fence or guide and clamping it to the wood. I save my off cuts and use it to build up or shim the area around the wood so I'm never getting any flex.
Some times I'm clamping 3 layers of wood, cutting the middle one.
I tried one of those aluminum cam lock guides and its not as good.
Too easy to slip.

taping the path with blue painters tape. Helps prevent fraying and splintering.
Buying void free baltic birch or similar quality wood.
Using my cheap 20V Craftsman circular saw I get cuts that look machined.
 

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Yes, n you'll find that always having a basic combo kit (6 3/8 skill saw, impact driver, drill) few clamps n that straight edge that you do Alot !!!.
Lots of great info being suggested here, like having HD do plywood cuts or doing on floor propped up.
Have you considered some of those collapsable saw horses (a lil pricy, but space saver). I have standard folding saw horses n also look up Bora collapsble tables (maybe the 2x4 one? you just always need to have that 24" x 48" (or lil larger) plywood top around, Or that 2' x 4' rubber maid folding utility table ? it also height adjustable n u can use it for cooking n stuff?

Wish the best.
 

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I’ve 2 sets of these. 30yrs of construction best collapse style I’ve found. The outriggers are pro to,use either 2x or 4x as support. With a sheet of ply on top you have a portable 4x8 table. As for the circular saw. I still prefer full size 71/4”. Maybe I’m partial to it cause it’s all I’ve ever use. 😊. I do feel they control better. Not sure who mentioned a straight edge??? I’ve one from depot that’s 8’ and has built in end clamps and is adjustable. Super handy

hope,this helps out. 👍🏽
 

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For clean cuts in plywood you need a good 7 1/4" circular saw blade. I have made clean cuts with a Diablo Ultra Finish or Irwin Marathon, 60 tooth carbide blade. The 24 tooth carbide blades should only be used for cutting framing lumber.

The low cost circular saws have a stamped steel shoe which has a large radius on the edge. The better circular saws have a higher quality shoe, with a square edge. This more accurate shoe runs cleaner against a guide. For this application use a "side-winder" and not a "worm-drive" circular saw.
 
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