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More parts needed - I'll update when all is said and done

Eaton passed me to Spencer Fluid Power which passed me to West Coast Differential. Talked to Rusty (Eight00-510-0nine50) who definitely knew what he was talking about with the Ford Transit! Yes! So great to talk to someone who knows their stuff with the Transit differential!
Ok, here's the scoop:
(for the Transit 350, 9.75" axle, 3.31 ratio to swap to the limited slip Eaton TrueTrac 913A477)
Rusty said its an easy swap.
He confirmed the 913A477 is the way to go.
He said you should have spare bearings, race, and shim kit ready just in case anything is damaged during the swap (even if you have low miles).
When you pop in the Truetrac use the factory shims as your base.
You MIGHT have to use a few shims from the kit.
The shims are easy to install - they're installed outboard of the races.
Shim kit part number: SS9.75F
(I went with the Yukon SK SSF9.75 because it was on Amazon ($50))
Backup bearing kit: (standard 9.75 Ford axle) Timken NP343847 ($34)
Race kit: (standard 9.75 Ford axle) Timken NP372019 ($16)
Mobil 1 Synthetic Gear Lube LS 75W-90, 2.6L needed
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I'll let you guys know how the install goes once I have it done! Thanks again everyone for your input! It will be good to know that we won't be getting stuck in the snow as easily with this Truetrac in our ride! ;)
.
.......So a few surprises that came up while having a professional auto shop work on this:
New ring gear bolts and shaft bolts are mandatory for this job per Ford! If you bring these bolts in to the shop you won't have to pay the 180% shop price increase!
10 shaft bolts (5 per shaft), part W716084 S439 @ $3.50 a piece
12 ring gear bolts, part F75Z 4216 AA @ $3.85 a piece
Differential gasket, part HL3Z 4036 A, $21
Sway bar bolts, part W500633 S442 @ $2.50 a piece
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Could have saved $100 if I had known this before taking it all in. But hey, they have to make a living right? :)
Again, I'll lay this all out with parts, prices and total costs when i pick up the van tomorrow. Probably looking around $1500 p/l :crying:
 

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Complete Truetrac swap outline

Hey guys. As promised here’s the final breakdown for having a shop install a Truetrac in a 2017 Transit 350 XLT with a 3.31 axle (9.75”L with 34 spline):
(You can talk to Rusty at West Coast Differential on any questions you have, Eight00-510-0nine50)
Quick swap steps info:
Have spare bearings, races, and the shim kit ready just in case anything is damaged during the swap (even if you have low miles). Most professional shops will not reuse the old ones for liability.
When you pop in the Truetrac, use the factory shims as your base.
You MIGHT have to use a few shims from the kit.
The shims are easy to install - they're installed outboard of the races.
PARTS:
Eaton Trutrac, part 913A477, $640 (incld tax)
Shim kit: Yukon SK SSF9.75, $50
Bearing: (standard 9.75 Ford axle) Timken NP343847 ($34 x 2)
Race: (standard 9.75 Ford axle) Timken NP372019 ($16 x 2)
MasterPro GL5 Synthetic Gear Lube 75W-90, 2.9L needed ($12 x 3)
New ring gear bolts and shaft bolts are mandatory for this job per Ford dealership! If you bring these bolts in to your shop you won't have to pay the 180% price increase when they order them for you!
Shaft bolts (5 per shaft), Ford part W716084 S439 @ $3.50 x 10
Ring gear bolts, Ford part F75Z 4216 AA @ $3.85 x 12
Differential gasket, Ford part HL3Z 4036 A, $21
Sway bar bolts, Ford part W500633 S442 @ $2.50 a piece
Labor $900 (~8 hours)
Total: $2020! Aiy! :|
(people, have a limited slip put in when you buy it new in the factory!!! = $385!) :eek:
Drivability: no noises, whistles, or whining. Sounds great and I feel no change in handling. Cornering is totally fine.
I’ll update after a couple years in the snow. Thanks everyone and hope this helps! :D
 

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Thanks Benny. Only question I come up with is the new fluid. If this is the Torsten Ltd slip, I didn’t think it needed (or wanted) a fluid with friction modifiers. What I read (a year ago, so off the top of my head) was that Eaton recommended Dino oil, not synthetic (and again, without modifiers). Personally, I don’t get the Dino vs synthetic thing, but that is what it said (a year ago....maybe they’ve updated their recommendations since then).


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Masterpro GL5 75W-90 synthetic gear oil

Thanks Benny. Only question I come up with is the new fluid. If this is the Torsten Ltd slip, I didn’t think it needed (or wanted) a fluid with friction modifiers. What I read (a year ago, so off the top of my head) was that Eaton recommended Dino oil, not synthetic (and again, without modifiers). Personally, I don’t get the Dino vs synthetic thing, but that is what it said (a year ago....maybe they’ve updated their recommendations since then).


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You bet Imp,
This snip below is from Eaton's Truetrac pdf found on their website (www.eaton.com/Eaton/ProductsServices/Vehicle/Differentials/detroit-truetrac/#tabs-2). Go to "Vehicle Applications" and then select the highlighted text "Full application guide" at the bottom:

PDF Page 19:
"A quality petroleum GL5 rated (mineral) based oil is recommended. Synthetic oils may also be used if desired per axle manufacturer’s
recommendations. Friction modifiers should not be used however, as they will decrease overall performance (reduce differential bias)."

MasterPro's 75W-90 is recommended for the Transit 350 XLT diff. So since the GL5 met Eaton's specs and the 75W-90 met Ford's specs, I figured it was a win-win. ;)
MasterPro's 75W-90 does not come with additives (Friction Mods).
(Again, I had the Truetrac installed, not the Torsten)
 

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I must have misread. I thought you said Mobil1 75w90 LS. I think that part in the Eaton blurb where it allows synthetic if the original manufacturer specifies it is new. But that’s probably a good thing. I was grappling with this a few years ago (previous van, or maybe in my Subaru, or maybe both) and remember it was hard to find the right stuff without the friction modifiers. I think I had to resort to Amsoil in one, and Motul in the other. But neither were Eaton Trutrac, so...well, so, forget all that. MasterPro, eh?


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I must have misread. I thought you said Mobil1 75w90 LS. I think that part in the Eaton blurb where it allows synthetic if the original manufacturer specifies it is new. But that’s probably a good thing. I was grappling with this a few years ago (previous van, or maybe in my Subaru, or maybe both) and remember it was hard to find the right stuff without the friction modifiers. I think I had to resort to Amsoil in one, and Motul in the other. But neither were Eaton Trutrac, so...well, so, forget all that. MasterPro, eh?


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No worries Imp. You're right on. I originally did write down Mobile1 when I was beginning the project, but went with MasterPro because it fit the bill and it was at O'Reilly's Auto down the street. :D
 

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Regarding correct diff fluid, I tried to find a definitive statement in my owners manual, and came up disappointed. I had presumed the fluid spec would be 75w90, but the closest I could find was a reference to “permanent” fill 75w140 synthetic, in the “exceptions” section under maintenance (contradicting the scheduled replacement at 150,000). Otherwise, they hinted at changing rear diff fluid every 3000 miles. Yes, 3k, not 30k. But, it wasn’t presented in a table like the motor oil, coolant, transmission, brake fluid, etc specs were presented under “Capacities and Specifications.”

Has anyone seen an official rear diff fluid spec from Ford? And then, does this match the Eaton spec?

PS, I have a 250, not a 350, but my manual doesn’t address any differences.


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Regarding correct diff fluid, I tried to find a definitive statement in my owners manual, and came up disappointed. I had presumed the fluid spec would be 75w90, but the closest I could find was a reference to “permanent” fill 75w140 synthetic, in the “exceptions” section under maintenance (contradicting the scheduled replacement at 150,000). Otherwise, they hinted at changing rear diff fluid every 3000 miles. Yes, 3k, not 30k. But, it wasn’t presented in a table like the motor oil, coolant, transmission, brake fluid, etc specs were presented under “Capacities and Specifications.”

Has anyone seen an official rear diff fluid spec from Ford? And then, does this match the Eaton spec?

PS, I have a 250, not a 350, but my manual doesn’t address any differences.


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The reality is the all OEM are in the business of selling new vehicles, not keeping your existing vehicle on the road forever. They also are graded/rated on maintenance costs as it factors into the magic total cost of ownership estimate (TCO), so the more maintenance they can tell you to put off longer or totally neglect, makes the TCO number look smaller and more attractive to fleets and other customers. The thinner oils are also engineered for better fuel mileage but may tradeoff wear protection in some circumstances.

Thats why you see "lifetime" transmission fluid/spark plugs/rear axle oil. The reality is that the "lifetime" of a vehicle probably means something drastically different between the OEM and us. The reality is that you really can neglect spark plugs/transmission fluid/rear axle fluid and do 10,000 mile oil changes if the lifetime of a vehicle is only 100,000 miles. There is always a tradeoff.

Ford says that the rear end fluid will last the lifetime of the vehicle (I have also seen 150,000 miles) unless you fall under the severe duty schedule that includes towing, then they say to change it every 3,000 miles. Personally I am going to change my non-synthetic rear axle fluid every 20,000 miles or so. Its fairly easy to do. They recommend 75W85 this fluid:

https://www.fcsdchemicalsandlubricants.com/main/product.asp?product=SAE+75W-85+Premium+Synthetic+Hypoid+Gear+Lubricant&category=Transaxle%20Fluid

which meets the GL5 spec, but I will use a GL5 non synthetic oil like Eaton recommends above.

I will also change my spark plugs @ 60,000 miles, Transmission drop pan fluid/filter change @ 40,000 miles and oil changes every 5,000 miles or less (usually the first free weekend day after it hits 4,000 miles)
 

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@kc, I think I get your point, at least one of them, but I’m still not satisfied the spec is 75w85 for a 2015 T250. The link you provided has other options under the Transaxle Fluid tab: 75w85, 75w90 (several), 75w140, and 80w90. Some mention the Ford GT, but others just say something like “where grade 75w-whatever is specified”. Again, the ONLY grade mentioned in my owners manual is 75w140, but it isn’t mentioned in the correct context to be interpreted as the correct fluid. Interesting, though, since I didn’t know there was a 75w85; the more common are 75w90, or 80w90 for conventional, or the heavier 75w140.


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Found out my van was always a 3.31

Benny, this is a great write-up.

One question, did you change from 3.31 to 3.73?
Hi Joe,
I was initially told by the dealership that my new van was a 3.73. Once I saw the stamp in the door, that it was actually a 3.31, I updated my posts accordingly. Later I found out that most of the 3.5L Ecoboosts come with 3.31 because they can handle the ratio (they have more torque and it saves gas money). Take care.
 

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Again, the ONLY grade mentioned in my owners manual is 75w140, but it isn’t mentioned in the correct context to be interpreted as the correct fluid.
Weird. My 2017 owner's manual doesn't give interpretation leeway as it states one specification: "Motorcraft® SAE 75W-85 Premium Synthetic Hypoid Gear Lubricant (U.S.) WSS-M2C942-A"
 

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Look to the F150

@kc, I think I get your point, at least one of them, but I’m still not satisfied the spec is 75w85 for a 2015 T250. The link you provided has other options under the Transaxle Fluid tab: 75w85, 75w90 (several), 75w140, and 80w90. Some mention the Ford GT, but others just say something like “where grade 75w-whatever is specified”. Again, the ONLY grade mentioned in my owners manual is 75w140, but it isn’t mentioned in the correct context to be interpreted as the correct fluid. Interesting, though, since I didn’t know there was a 75w85; the more common are 75w90, or 80w90 for conventional, or the heavier 75w140.


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Hey Imp, don't forget to compare your axle and diff to its big brother the F150. You'll have more web hits when you search there. The Transit just isn't as popular on the web. ;)
My 2017 owner's manual says to use Motorcraft SAE 75W-85 Premium Synthetic Hypoid Gear Lubricant (Spec WSS-M2C942-A), listed on page 290 of HK3J 19A321 AA enUSA, Edition date: 04/2016 (Transit OM_052516). Understanding oil viscosity charts, we know that 75W-90 is only 5 units heavier on the high temp side, which works well for my hot climate. There's always room to bump the weight up and down a bit depending on where you live. I change my diff oil every 70,000 because i don't tow a lot and that's around the time i do a major tune-up (tranny, coolant, etc). Hope this helps.
 

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I found a 2015 owners manual online. No mention of the 75w85, but under exceptions, mentions the 75w140. Then tried the 2016 version. I meant to screen copy the relevant pages, but ran out of time. here is what I found:

2015: consistent with what I have been saying: only 75w140 mentioned...but in the “exceptions” section under “Maintenance.”
2016: ( publish date sometime in 2015): 75w85 in the appropriate place, under “Capacities & Specifications” where it belongs. Just to confuse, the “exceptions” heading under the “Maintenance” section still says 75w140 for a lifetime fill.

I haven’t been able to pursue newer manuals, but will if time allows. However, I strayed into a Raptor. Log, and they were having the same discussion, and I don’t believe there was a solid conclusion there either.

My opinion is (just an opinion) is the 2015 manual just missed the 75w85 spec, as I am unaware of any changes for 2016+ rear axles. The “exception” section still mystifies me. I’ve got plenty of time before a change/refill is required, and unfortunately not plenty of money, so the Trutrac is a ways off. I wish Ford would make an official statement that the 75w85 is the spec for all Transits ( unless they have changed it for newer than 2016’s). And given all this, If I were able to swing a TruTrac tomorrow, I would double check with Eaton to see why they prefer mineral (Dino) lube over synthetic (though the language has softened). My GUESS is it’s because many synth 75w90’s on your local parts store’s shelves have friction modifiers which are for clutches, and I don’t believe improve matters for a Torsen. EDIT: deleted the rest of original post, it was all pure speculation on my part. There were some other minor edits above too.

2015 (& 2016) exceptions page: IMG_0005.jpg
2016 capacities & spec page: IMG_0006.jpg

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I would love to switch to this system but am wondering if anyone knows how it would affect the speedo and computer if at all, when I switch from 3.31 to 3.73.
Your speedo will read higher than your actual speed. Your vehicle will reach its speed limiter at a slower actual speed which can be a problem in some driving situations, especially with speed limited fleet vehicles. You don't touch the computer swapping out gears, but the traction control system will think you are going faster on the speedo than you actually are. So the computer may engage traction control prematurely, especially around banking turns. Depends how and where you drive, we have a lot of curves and hills.
 

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I thought the speedometer was based on a sensor in the brake hub, not rotation calculations using transmission and hub gear ratios?

I could understand transmission shift points being incorrect though, as the change in gear ratios would not be known to the tranny.
 

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I am looking for a used 3.31 ring and pinion to install in my 2016 T350, 3.7, low roof. I drive lightly loaded, mostly freeway. I am wishing to increase gas mileage.
 

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Proper Lube for TruTrac

Thank you KC for a great thread - - I'm calling various installers in SoCal now. Regarding the question on proper lubricant, I just got off the phone with an Eaton technical rep and he said in NO UNCERTAIN TERMS, the best oil to use is a Lucas brand, petro-based (non-synthetic), 75w90 or 80w90 with NO additives or friction modifiers. There was no hemming and hawing - - This is what they recommend, period. I neglected to ask him about recommended change intervals, but I'll re-post if I get some additional information. Hopefully, this puts to rest the question of which way to go on the lube question.

Regarding the basic application of a TruTrac #913A477 in a Transit, he came up with this same part number on his own. They don't list it for the Transit on their website simply because they haven't actually installed one themselves, but based on the long history of the Ford 34-spline, 9.75" rear end, he acknowledged that it should work. He was very interested in this thread, and I sent him the link. I encouraged him to investigate further because there is likely some solid pent-up demand by Transit owners everywhere.

If I go through with this install, I'll post a recap.
 
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