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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve read that there definitely isn’t - however, using my multimeter, using the middle post as positive and either of the two outermost posts that hold the plastic housing on as negative, I get a 12v reading. Is there a reason not to use this as a negative connection point? The only thing connected to it is a 30 amp dc-dc charger which I put a 40 amp breaker on to hopefully keep the 60 amp fuse from blowing. Thanks!
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Conscious is thats a shitty ground. its attached to plastic in back and is only "incidentally" grounded.
 

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I don't think I'd trust it. There are dedicated grounding points located around the van. If you search here on the forum you should be able to find them listed.
 

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2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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I tried it! I did the same thing: used my multi-meter and "confirmed" that it was both a good ground to the 12V+ side AND that it metered out as direct-short (Ohms) to ground. Then I tried it - just intending it as a temporary, y'know... :rolleyes:

**** thing didn't work. As soon as the load was more than the multi-meter (okay... over an amp or whatever), it didn't work. Moved to the nearby d-ring bolt hole, which is working fantastic for 2kW+ of load between CCP and CCP2.

YMMV and all that... 🤷‍♀️
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your input. Looked up the BEMM recommendations and looks like the nearest is located on the e-brake. Is that what you used as well @gregoryx ?
 

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If I could, I would write many negative posts about the CCP. But It was easy enough to route a black ground wire to one of the open spots on the negative battery terminal posts.
 

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Thanks for your input. Looked up the BEMM recommendations and looks like the nearest is located on the e-brake. Is that what you used as well @gregoryx ?
The closest solid, approved mount is called #25 in the BEMM and is located between the driver and passenger seats. I didn't use it.

I think maybe that e-brake bolt was on an old BEMM but the 2020 said not to use that either. Of course, the 2020 BEMM said not to use the d-ring bolt either (specifically, as I recall - I think @jkmann has confirmed that when I've blasphemed on other threads 😏 ) but the OLD data said to find a solid ground (according to posts here from folks with older vans). I went with the way we've been doing it for the 35-40 years I've been working on cars: a really solid mount to a really solid chassis point - the closest d-ring.

As always, YMMV and you-do-you and all that... :)

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... As soon as the load was more than the multi-meter (okay... over an amp or whatever), it didn't work. ...
I discovered that years ago in different low voltage DC applications, including one particularly vexing problem that Disney was having. Their electrical and engineering techs could not figure it out so they finally broke down after a few weeks and called me, the specialized contractor who cost more than their in-house guys. In 10 minutes I determined the issue had to be in a certain junction box, opened it and sure enough ants had built a nest in there and some weak connections were arcing. Took care of it in a few more minutes and submitted my invoice. Ka-Ching!
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The issue is that volts can jump a gap or weak connection without amps, yet as soon as you try to put a load on it, no-go.

Maybe someone with more electrical engineering knowledge than my seat of the pants learnin' can shed more light on the issue.
 

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I discovered that years ago in different low voltage DC applications, including one particularly vexing problem that Disney was having. Their electrical and engineering techs could not figure it out so they finally broke down after a few weeks and called me, the specialized contractor who cost more than their in-house guys. In 10 minutes I determined the issue had to be in a certain junction box, opened it and sure enough ants had built a nest in there and some weak connections were arcing. Took care of it in a few more minutes and submitted my invoice. Ka-Ching!
View attachment 150986

The issue is that volts can jump a gap or weak connection without amps, yet as soon as you try to put a load on it, no-go.

Maybe someone with more electrical engineering knowledge than my seat of the pants learnin' can shed more light on the issue.
I think it all comes down to Ohm's law. V = I * R. If the resistance (R) is really high, you can still push a little current (I) with a little voltage (V). But once you try for more current with the same high resistance, you need a LOT of volts to drive it through. And, in most systems the voltage is capped. Also, of course, if you up the voltage you are just going to get arcing around the high resistance connection ... and that ain't pretty.
 

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There is a hole on the horizontal surface of the emergency brake bracket that is a bit larger than 3/8". Used that hole for a ground for my vehicle powered inverter. The bracket is between the driver seat pedestal and the emergency brake. Bolted to side of pedestal and the emergency brake bolts to the other side of the bracket. Worked for the inverter ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks everyone! The e brake bolt looked most enticing, but the bemm recommended the 25 ground, so I ended up doing that. I don’t like that it can be stepped on, and that you can feel it when being stepped on, but I’ll sleep well knowing it’s the “proper” spot.
 

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While I have to agree that the grounding arrangement is pretty much of an afterthought, the CCP is by far superior to the stock alternator power takeoff of the Promaster and Sprinter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
True, but it’s still pretty poorly thought out. Having to take the seat out to replace a fuse? Having positive but no negative posts?

If its purpose is to allow upfitters to create better systems on top of Ford’s platform, it still fails in that regard. Imagine being a construction business or something, ordering a transit, paying an upfitter for racks and a way to power your cutting tools, then if you blow a fuse you have to disassemble your drivers seat and replace a fuse, at a job site!

While I’m thankful I didn’t have to run my power through the firewall or under the vehicle and all that, it seems like the ccp was an afterthought that was not user tested at all before putting it in a commercial vehicle.
 

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No different then at home, You add smaller fuses/breakers downstream of your main fuse/breaker.
People on the forum in the past have added a Fuse/breaker 10 amps smaller then the main ccp fuse.
Some of us have bypassed the ccp fuses all together and hooked our own larger circuit breaker directly to the auxilary fuse box bus bar.
 

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I'm going to side with Stonetemp on this one... Ford should build it right for users to use the product they way they want and they haven't. This isn't just a DIY issue... I've spoken to upfitters who complain about these things as well.

The home circuit analogy is a good one... imagine this: Ford having included on every van an easily accesible panel where there are empty slots for me to add my own individual circuits at an amperage of my choosing, with a grounded busbar enclosed in the same space. That's what my house has, and that would be wonderful, but it isn't what Ford has done. They've kind of gone half way... we will give you "some" power take off points, but they will be difficult to maintain, and we won't really give you accessible grounding points where you will need them AND we will build the van in a way that makes traditional automotive DC grounding (find an unpainted metal surface) unreliable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Honestly, having a negative post in the ccp, and an easy way to get to the fuses, and I’d be happy. ****, I’d be ok if it didn’t come with the posts so someone couldn’t accidentally touch something across it, so that you’d have to buy the bus posts from Ford separately. As long as getting to the fuses was simple and they were standard.

I only have 30 amps coming out of mine and put a 40 amp breaker on it so hopefully it would trip before it got close to 60. But I’m just waiting for the day I’m in the middle of nowhere and blow that fuse. Taking the whole front seat out to change a ccp fuse is ridiculous.
 

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The front seat does not need to come out, I changed the battery with the seat still bolted in. See the Ford You Tube video on how to access the battery
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Based on the videos I’ve watched, they’ve all taken out the seat to access the fuses for the ccp due to the way the metal shielding under the seat has to be removed. I’ve removed the battery without removing the seat, but the whole bottom tray has to come out to get to the fuses unless I’m wrong.
 
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