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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
We have a conundrum we would like to solve.

We love camping in our Ford Transit, which is a seat stripped Passenger Wagon with a bed frame, air mattress, and a small shelf with food, igloo cooler, and a cooking kit featuring a backpacking camp stove. The "payload" is minimal.

We have many opportunities, within a few hours of our house, for setting up a short term "base camp" and exploring the area on old jeep roads. These roads are too crude for the Transit so we are buying a Jeep.

The conundrum is that after we get the Jeep, and take it on trips, we are going to need someplace to sleep. We are afraid we will want a small camper trailer to take with us, but we don't have anyplace to store a camp trailer, and we already own a nice Ford Transit, so the the ideal option for us would be to tow the Jeep to an accessible base camp location and spend a few days on outback excursions while sleeping in the Transit, but by spec a Jeep Wrangler is too heavy for our 3.5L Eco Boost Medium Roof Medium Length Passenger Wagon Transit 350.

Our interest in Jeep excursions is more or less confined to regional activities in the 4 corners area of the USA. We would like to tow the Jeep a couple hundreds miles and claim a camp spot with the Transit. We are not expecting to travel cross country at Interstate speeds etc. One obvious option is for us to drive the Transit and the Jeep separately, but Mrs T and I enjoy each other's company so driving twin solo is not an appealing solution.

Towing a Jeep is not my favorite idea, but after thinking through the options over and over again, it seems like it should be considered as possibly the most practical choice we can make.

I am writing to ask if anyone has any experience towing a Jeep behind a Transit, and if they can offer some thoughts on the subject.

Thank you.
 

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Hmmm... I would like to get more info on this topic too. I want to tow our well-built Jeep around North America if possible either flat towing or on a trailer. Just wondering if it is asking too much from a transit.
 

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Mr T, I am in your same position in regards to future trips. I've considered a UTV on a trailer, but there are places where you cannot operate them on the roads you need to traverse to get to trails from campsite. The other street legal lightweight version is a Suzuki Samurai. I had one when they first came out, and I never had any problems with it. You can sometimes find them unmolested in decent condition for under $3-5k, but the majority have been "offroaderized". Parts are readily available, and it's an old fashioned non-ECU system that is easy to work on. And I believe they can be flat-towed without issue. But for peace of mind regarding wearing out parts, I'd use a trailer. They only weigh 2000lbs.

And if you want to camp in your offroad destination, get a rooftop fold out tent and put it on the roll cage.
 

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For the scenario you describe, I wouldn't hesitate to get a lightweight car trailer with brakes and haul a Jeep on it.
Click for curb weights of different Jeep models
Perusing your link, for most post 2000 MY models, the trailer/Jeep combo is generally going to exceed Transit tow capacity. Unless you get one of the 0 lb curb weight Jeeps it lists. If it's a Jeep, why not just flat tow it? I'm assuming OP wants a Jeep less than 20 years old which are heavier.

I like @surly Bill's idea of a UTV on a trailer. I'd think the UTV would be more fun than a Jeep. If OP wants a newer Samurai, I see the Grand Vitara is still around 3000lbs. Given the 4WD, it should be able to be flat towed too.

 

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If it's a Jeep, why not just flat tow it?
That would certainly work and some are fine with flat towing, yet my personal preference is using a trailer to tow a vehicle based on my experience and for many reasons . A small single axle trailer that can handle a 4,000 lb Jeep would be in a comfortable weight range for an EcoBoost van and my choice given the scenario presented. ymmv, this does not need to turn into a thread about vehicle towing methods.
 

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Hmmm... I would like to get more info on this topic too. I want to tow our well-built Jeep around North America if possible either flat towing or on a trailer. Just wondering if it is asking too much from a transit.
That would depend on the curb weight of your Jeep and the trailer you choose, as well as your specific Transit specs. You can search for various discussions on real-life towing experiences in here and go from there. Some members are regularly pulling fairly hefty loads.
 

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I've owned 130+ Jeeps over the last 20 years (many of them old CJ parts vehicles I scavenged while rebuilding a handful of nice ones) across all eras from 1955 to 2014. The weights of these Jeeps vary by several thousand pounds. I'd personally look for a smaller 4WD (Suzuki, Geo, older Jeep CJ). If you're looking at newer JKs/JLs, they're HEAVY, and too big, IMHO. Also something to consider...if you're in an accident towing a vehicle over the recommended weight, you may find yourself in the middle of an insurance nightmare.

Craig
 

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... The weights of these Jeeps vary by several thousand pounds....
Of course they do, with all those spare parts you lug around in them, lol :rolleyes:

But yes, the weight of the specific Jeep and the trailer (if used) are important. It appears there are many scenarios well within the towing specs for the Transit.
 

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I've owned 130+ Jeeps over the last 20 years (many of them old CJ parts vehicles I scavenged while rebuilding a handful of nice ones) across all eras from 1955 to 2014.
Fun, I've messed with a few but my experiences have been much more limited. I particularly enjoyed a pair of bulletproof early CJ's (I think one was a '56) we used in our cattle/tree farm operation when I was in college. We welded up a boom and hand crank winch on one to haul 25' ornamental trees out of the South Florida swamp we grew them in, and I often was chosen to ride on the front bumper as ballast to keep the front wheels on the ground so we could steer, lol (it's possible that I posed as a hood ornament more than once) #wildtimes 😎
 

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PS: I was not chosen as ballast because I was heaviest, but the just one craziest to ride up there. I was usually the driver, but when the wheels lifted off the ground I was like, here you drive. Now I preach for a living, lol :love: #kindathesamething
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thank you everyone. We are looking forward to getting a contemporary Jeep Wrangler so it will be heavier than many of the lighter weight choices.
 

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I currently do exactly what you are asking about, towing a 2013 Jeep Wrangler with my 2016 Transit. Usually I tow the Jeep behind my big motorhome, but there have been several times where I tow it with the Transit. The Jeep is nice in that it has been designed to be flat towed, so there is no need for a trailer. There is a detailed section in the Jeep owner's manual regarding recreational towing.

My 2016 Transit 350 with the 3.7L V6 and a 3.73 axle ratio is rated by Ford for 5350 pounds towing with a 10800 GCWR. The 2013 2 door Jeep Wrangler JK weighs almost exactly 4000 pounds, well within these limits. Note that a 4 door Jeep Wrangler is a heavier and longer vehicle. If you plan to tow a new JL Wrangler, the numbers are probably different.

I use an NSA Ready Brute Elite tow bar with a build in surge brake that operates the Jeep brakes when needed. It is very important to have a braking system when towing something as heavy as a Jeep. Many states require trailer brakes for over 1500 pounds. I also installed a Curt class 4 receiver hitch under the Transit. I liked the way the class 4 model bolted to the frame better than the class 3 version which used large self tapping screws. The Transit also has a Curt 56249 trailer light kit which operates the Jeep's brake lights and turn signals.

The Jeep tows fine using the Transit. It would probably be better with the Eco-Boost engine, but I'm satisfied with the 3.7L engine. There is a noticeable decrease in fuel economy when towing, but that is to be expected. I most recently towed the Jeep with the Transit from Las Vegas, NM to Las Vegas, NV, on I-40. It is a mix of flat and moderate mountain driving. It was an easy drive with no issues towing the Jeep.
 

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A Polaris RZR would be about 1600x more fun than a heavy jeep. A jeep behind a transit seems redundant. I've done a lot of wheeling in jeeps, land cruisers, and H1 hummers. It gets old fast in those big heavy vehicles.

Got in a RZR and was like... what have jeep people been doing with their lives. Jeep people are like Texans.
 

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A Polaris RZR would be about 1600x more fun than a heavy jeep. A jeep behind a transit seems redundant. I've done a lot of wheeling in jeeps, land cruisers, and H1 hummers. It gets old fast in those big heavy vehicles.

Got in a RZR and was like... what have jeep people been doing with their lives. Jeep people are like Texans.
LOL, some how they have been turning a blind eye to them. I just turned a jeep buddy on to side by sides. Rich guy, tricked out 392 HEMI JK, had no idea RZR's existed and is dumping the Jeep.
 
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