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Discussion Starter #1
I've been doing much reading on insulating a cargo van and now somewhat bewildered.

Advice seems to be all over the landscape.

Some use adhesives and foam, others insist not to because of trapped moisture worries. Some people tout closed cell foam, others insist on materials that don't release fumes, etc.

I was surprised to learn the Van Specialties merely uses fiberglass insulation, same as what is used in homes.

One person insisted that the best thing to use is a product called EZ Cool.

http://www.lobucrod.com/index.html

For whatever reason it has particularly drawn my attention and would like to know if others on this forum are familiar with it and would they recommend it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for your reply.

How do you provide 1" air space?

* Zounds! That is some heavy duty insulating it appears. I don't think they give 1" K-Flex away to commoners.
 

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I did a bunch of searching on this same subject and come to find there are nearly as many solutions as there are guys doing it. There seems to be no "this is the right way' agreement. Many will say 3M thinsulate is great, but very little specs to back it up and it's kinda hard to buy and not cheap.

I ended up using combination of things in different places.

In most of higher side walls I used a first layer of reflectix then recycled denim batting to fill the large voids. I found that Ford is now using recycled denim insulation on some vehicles. I was concerned with heat in the upper spaces.

For the lower sidewalls I used a first layer of Noico sound deadening mat which is similar to Dynamat and EZ Cool mat, then the denim batting. I was more concerned with sound in the lower spaces.

For my roof I used a first layer of Noico then made a custom sandwich of 1/2" thick foil faced EPS insulation board with 2 layers of 3/16" bubble wrap in the middle to create a trapped air barrier.

I started with a cargo van so I had to make my own panels. I used 6mm thick expanded PVC sheet (Komatex brand) but also called Celtec etc. This material also has insulation properties.

I ordered the Noico mat from Amazon but the reflectix, foil faced EPA, and denim batting were purchased locally at a Lowe's store.

The expanded PVC sheet was ordered from a plastics supplier.
 

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We sell 3M Thinsulate(TM) which is engineered for vehicles and used by OEMs like Honda, Tesla, GM and others. It is manufactured by the 3M automotive division.

More and more DIY and professional up-fitters are choosing Thinsulate(TM) because it is easy to install, provides awesome results and has great brand recognition.

Thinsulate(TM) is clearly the best practice for insulating a van and is quickly emerging as the industry standard. Having Thinsulate(TM) in your van will raise it's resell value because your buyer will recognize that you used the most appropriate materials.

Please email, pm or call for more information and to request a sample.

All the best,
Hein
Impact, Inc.
Hood River, OR
54l-49O 5O98
[email protected]
impactproducts | eBay
 

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Hein,

I can't tell how much you are selling in your ebay store listing. 5' wide but how long are the rolls?

Thanks
Dean

Thinsulate(TM) is 60" wide and a typical van requires between 40 and 50 linear feet. We offer a variety of roll sizes in the drop down list.
 

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It is true that engineered materials cost more. Using Thinsulate(TM) eliminates the need for other resonance and noise reduction products in addition to providing the thermal insulating component. This can reduce total insulating costs.

Thinsulate(TM) passes all applicable Federal Motor Vehicle Safety standards, easy to install, will not harm your vehicle, it does not off-gas or smell so overall a pretty efficient and appropriate solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
For my roof I used a first layer of Noico then made a custom sandwich of 1/2" thick foil faced EPS insulation board with 2 layers of 3/16" bubble wrap in the middle to create a trapped air barrier.

I ordered the Noico mat from Amazon but the reflectix, foil faced EPA, and denim batting were purchased locally at a Lowe's store.

I've been using Noico extensively as a first layer for everywhere I insulate (except the floor). Haven't encountered any others who say they have used it. Now that you've had it in place for a while what do you think of it? I realize you've used multiple products so maybe not so easy to tell what should get the credit.

When you read about insulating panels it is asserted that you only need to cover a quarter of the panel with sound deadening material like Noico but I've thrown that advice into the ash can and basically strive to cover every square inch. I go by the sound it makes when you tap on a covered panel and to my ears there is no mistaking the fact that full coverage produces noticeably more sound deadening. My doors, which are the only fully finished parts of the van (except roof over driver's area) sound so solid when you shut them it is gratifying beyond description.

When people ask me about what I'm doing on the van I always demo by rapping on the sliding door (as of now not insulated), then the front fender, then finally the door. Their eyes go wide when they hear the difference. Not sure what this will all translate to as I'm driving and my wife and I are listening to audio books etc. but for now happy as a clam.
 

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Sounds like your way is a quality one. I always go with what I think would work best for my needs and not advice from someone selling something. People's opinions change when they're not profiting off their advice.
 

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I apologize if the flavor of my earlier posts in this thread were too promotional. Babybuffy is certainly approaching noise reduction with proven methods and materials and the results will be excellent. I am familiar with Noico products. As engineer for CASE, I designed noise reduction solutions for construction equipment. No easy task that involved all sorts of layers of different densities and compositions. The acoustic properties of noise absorption materials are often quantified as the absorption coefficient relative to frequency. This a great way to compare materials. Below is a graph showing this specification for the different grades of automotive grade Thinsulate(TM). For SM600L, the absorption coefficient varies from .55 to .95 over the frequency range 500 to 5000Hz.



As BabyBuffy mentions, a common way to demonstrate panel resonance reduction is by rapping on the panels from the outside. Our customers are not always convinced Thinsulate(TM) will reduce resonance. The following youtube video shows this test on our Transit:


All the best,
Hein
Impact, Inc.
54l 49O 5O98
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hein,

No need for you to apologize for anything I've seen. New people come here all the time and your input should be a great benefit to anyone doing research.

Just to clarify, I use Noico extensively as the first layer before using Thinsulate. I will eventually have the perfect opportunity to make another judgement on the matter. Most of my roof is now layered with Noico. In the meantime I've been working on installing the floor. My van sits in the weather and when it rains I hear it. Anxious to find out when the time comes what the rain will sound like with the Thinsulate layer in place.
 

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While I did put a layer of prodex between the ribbing of the van, for noise lessening only... and I'm pretty happy with the quietness of the cargo area (except for the roof when raining... only rained once and I'm going to add there).... I'm really not a good judge since I'm hard of hearing for high pitch sounds, and I have driven convertibles for 25 years of my life :D hahahahaha talk about wind noise! :D
 

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Please provide independent support of your claim:
"Having Thinsulate(TM) in your van will raise it's resell value"
I'm sorry but it's pure conjecture based on the fact that Thinsulate(TM) is a great product and a well recognized brand.

All the best,
Hein
Impact, Inc.
54l 49O 5O98
 

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I'm sorry but it's pure conjecture based on the fact that Thinsulate(TM) is a great product and a well recognized brand.

All the best,
Hein
Impact, Inc.
54l 49O 5O98
I'd sure as heck pay a lot more for a used van with thinsulate than one filled with sprayfoam!
 

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thinsulate is spendy and not a great thermal insulator for its thickness
but for noise insulation I have to say it works Great -

after installing thinsulate and glueing in place the noise difference
in my van is like night and day -

Thinsulate has been worth every penny as sound insulation -
 
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