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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Everyone,

Wanted to share my notes in the hopes it would help someone else, at least saving some time spend searching threads for the next person as this topics seems to be well discussed, but a bit scattered in a few different locations. (I'll keep updating as I find others.) My specific installation was on a 2019 350 with 10 way power leather seats both heated and with lumbar. Additionally the van is equipped with the “PUSHDOWN MANUAL PKG BRAKE” option.

Notable Tools:
T40 Torx Bit to remove the bolts which connect the seat rails to the base.
Cutting tools - Jigsaw or angle grinder.

Saved / Reference Threads:
Official OE Scopema install instructions here.
Joe-slc’s Overview on entire installation process
Far Out Ride: Driver Installation, Dual Battery Modificatio & E-Brake Relocation: Contains a good basic step by step on what to expect, include the parking brake modification*
Far Out Ride: Passenger Installation: Same but for the more straight forward / easier passenger side installation
Video overview of installation by Timrosemusi for those who prefer a video example
Video Installation by Outdoor Wanderlust; passenger side installation.
Cable Rubbing on Power Seat? Suggested solution by Larseaki
(I'll keep adding as I clear my old browser favorites)

Install Tips / Notes:
  • PUSHDOWN MANUAL PKG BRAKE: This made installation of the driver side swivel possible without any modification or use of the e-brake relocation bracket. The result was an installation time consistent with the passenger side, with similar ease.

  • Alignment of Bolt Holes: I read many posts about having to reem or expand the holes to get the Scopema swivel and factor seat base to align. When test fitting my driver’s side was only allowing 3 of 4 holes to align easily. However, rather than drill any material, I lifted the swivel off the base when starting each bolt, to allow the threads to engage. Effectively, getting all 4 bolts started 2-3 turns then I lowered the base and alternated tightening each bolt a couple turns at a time. It was tight but it was possible without any drilling.
  • Cutting the Trim: I used the backside of the plastic as my guide but effectively you are removing 1.5” in a straight line. You should not need to cut the frame which holds either the seat heater or lumbar buttons. Here I would suggest a jigsaw with fine tooth blade and orientating the seat so the cut is natural to make. Important: Use a painter tape or something similar to prevent scratching of the plastic. Photo Credits: Outdoor Wanderlust & BabyBuffy

  • Modifying the Seat Base: Surprised more people don’t do this to allow access to the jack and area under the seat. Super easy to cut, I simply connected the existing slots which were punched in the base with the fore mentioned jig saw. (Photo Credit dcp6904)

  • Power Seat Rails: I drilled / milled clearance holes in the Scopmea swivel to allow the seat rails to sit flush.

  • Power Seat Motors: As noted in a couple thread the plastic bracket which holds the motor can make contact with the seat swivel. Rather then install spacers / washers, I applied a couple zip-ties to pull the motor and bracket slightly towards the seat bottom.
 

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2021 HR Extended AWD Transit T-250
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Thanks for posting this, super useful info. I don't have my Transit yet to verify whether the following info is valid or not. However, a common issue with Sprinters is that the seat pedestal needs to be squared up before the swivel holes will line up with the pedestal seat bolt holes. In the Sprinter, there are bolts that can be loosened at the base of the pedestal, then the pedestal can be squared up. Once the pedestal is squared up, then the swivel holes will line up properly. Sorry if this is irrelevant info for the Transit.
 

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Great thread, nice too have so much info on the subject in one place! I just installed a Scopema on our non-powered passenger seat...love it! Being a manual seat I did not have to trim the side panel. I did cut a little more than an inch off the backs of the seat track to allow the seat to swivel without opening the door. Works great, but the seat need to be move to the exact spot. Too far forward and it hits center consol, too for back and it hits door...we do have the larger center console, so may be a non-issue for most! Sounds fiddly, but a nice white mark on the rail with a paint pen and it’s not an issue. Got the wife and kids up to speed, no problem! I do think I will remove the swivel and remount it 180, handle in the back. The seat is easier to slide forward while the swivel is still locked. But doing that covers the swivel lock, making it harder to reach. Probably just me, but I’m going to try it and see if it’s an improvement!
 

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Hi Everyone,

Wanted to share my notes in the hopes it would help someone else
  • Alignment of Bolt Holesple turns at a time. It was tight but it was possible without any drilling.
  • Cutting the Trim: You should not need to cut the frame which holds either the seat heater or lumbar. Here I would suggest a jigsaw with fine tooth blade and orientating the seat so the cut is natural to make.
  • Power Seat Rails: I drilled / milled clearance holes in the Scopmea swivel to allow the seat rails to sit flush.
  • Power Seat Motors: As noted in a couple thread the plastic bracket which holds the motor can make contact with the seat swivel. Rather then install spacers / washers, I applied a couple zip-ties to pull the motor and bracket slightly towards the seat bottom.
Thanks so much for this post. I have studied this topic too extensively while waiting for my van to be delivered.
I think you have added or clarified a few important items to the knowledge base.
  • I have not seen your assembly solution to the alignment of the bolt holes previously pointed out. While its "standard practice" to generally install all fastener before tightening it will be helpful to people that may not be familiar with this practice. Some members have also reported using the jack to square the base up when needed.
  • Your specific reference of no need to cut into the frame that holds the switches and a actual measurement are good points of reference.
  • I have never seen anything for the need to drill a relief area in the swivel for the power seat rail. (y)
  • Identifying the use of zip ties instead of plastic interference issue is a good point.
One fine point I picked up from another members post, was that it is possible to cleanly remove the u-shaped attachment piece by cutting it in the middle and then bending it to break the welds. Some others have bent it to achieve the clearance and keep the attachment point in place.

People have reported issued with the swivels rattling. I took a look at my uninstalled swivels to see if I could determine possible causes. This thread has some thoughts and possible solutions to the rattles including what I noticed
Empty Passenger Scopema Swivel Seat Rattling


I did cut a little more than an inch off the backs of the seat track to allow the seat to swivel without opening the door. Works great, but the seat need to be move to the exact spot. Too far forward and it hits center consol, too for back and it hits door...we do have the larger center console, so may be a non-issue for most! Sounds fiddly, but a nice white mark on the rail with a paint pen and it’s not an issue. Got the wife and kids up to speed, no problem! I do think I will remove the swivel and remount it 180, handle in the back. The seat is easier to slide forward while the swivel is still locked. But doing that covers the swivel lock, making it harder to reach. Probably just me, but I’m going to try it and see if it’s an improvement!
Interesting thought about possible benefits of reversing the swivel.. I believe the swivel point is off center to allow the seat to clear the door when rotating. I think this would require the drivers and passengers swivels to be swapped. I am not sure of any front or back bias of the swivel point I am going to look into this idea when I install my pair. Your idea for reference marks is great. Especially useful for power seats. Not sure I can visualize the need to cut the rails (actually I guess benefit) to cut the rails but will certainly keep that idea in mind when I install. Thanks.
 

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@stilljester
Thanks so much for this post. I have studied this topic too extensively while waiting for my van to be delivered.
I think you have added or clarified a few important items to the knowledge base.
  • I have not seen your assembly solution to the alignment of the bolt holes previously pointed out. While its "standard practice" to generally install all fastener before tightening it will be helpful to people that may not be familiar with this practice. Some members have also reported using the jack to square the base up when needed.
  • Your specific reference of no need to cut into the frame that holds the switches and a actual measurement are good points of reference.
  • I have never seen anything for the need to drill a relief area in the swivel for the power seat rail. (y)
  • Identifying the use of zip ties instead of plastic interference issue is a good point.
One fine point I picked up from another members post, was that it is possible to cleanly remove the u-shaped attachment piece by cutting it in the middle and then bending it to break the welds. Som others have bent it to achieve the clearance and keep the attachment point in place.

People have reported issued with the swivels rattling. I took a look at my uninstalled swivels to see if I could determine possible causes. This thread has some thoughts and possible solutions to the rattles including what I noticed
Empty Passenger Scopema Swivel Seat Rattling

@Osprey

Interesting thought about possible benefits of reversing the swivel.. I believe the swivel point is off center to allow the seat to clear the door when rotating. I think this would require the drivers and passengers swivels to be swapped. I am not sure of any front or back bias of the swivel point I am going to look into this idea when I install my pair. Your idea for reference marks is great. Especially useful for power seats. Not sure I can visualize the need to cut the rails (actually I guess benefit) to cut the rails but will certainly keep that idea in mind when I install. Thanks.
 

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I know one of the swivel bases is off center, but I don’t think it’s the Scopema. The swivel point looks to be center, seat lines up exactly with the base when turned 180, as best I can tell. As for trimming the back of the seat rail, that’s what contacts the door panel when trying to swivel the seat with the door closed. I’m working on the heater next, so it might be a few days before I get a chance to try it. I need to drop the fuel tank tomorrow, but with 10 degrees and windy in the morning it might be a challenge!
 

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When I did my seats the passenger side did not line up with one hole. I reached out to Travois and they recommended to not drill the swivel. They suggested to loosen the base where it connects to the floor and see if it would square up. It did not, so I got a long clamp, reversed it to be a spreader and after several attempts it aligned. The driver side went in with no issues.
 

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@stilljester , TFPU. Thanks for the idea on the zip-tie pull up. We did the washers and it still hits a bit. I'll give it a try - hopefully doesn't place too much strain on the motor or bracket.

For those above, the Scopemas are NOT off-center. Had I known, I wouldn't have purchased them. I would have gone with the Amazing Auto units - half the price, off-center, and a little higher - but that's what I end up with after washers anyway. 🤷‍♀️
 

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"Smokee" - 2021 T350 AWD 148" Ext. HR
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I lifted the swivel off the base when starting each bolt, to allow the threads to engage. Effectively, getting all 4 bolts started 2-3 turns then I lowered the base and alternated tightening each bolt a couple turns at a time. It was tight but it was possible without any drilling.
I read this post a while back but forgot about this tip. Would have saved me an hour of jacking and prying the base apart which in the end wasn't effective enough to get the holes aligned. Then I lifted the scopema up while getting that last screw started and they went in fine. Such a simple thing to overlook but worked for me. Thanks!
 

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for what it's worth, I just "finished" the install of my swivel on the passenger side. I figured out the zip-tie the motor up to the seat trick by myself before I saw this thread. Problem is, when you move the seat up and down, it pulls the motor up and down with it. I couldn't get the zip-tie adjusted such that it pulls the motor up enough to clear in the lowest seat position while also not pulling the motor up excessively in the highest position. So I've decided to replace the swivel bolts with button head bolts to get a little more clearance to the 10-way plastic motor carrier. Will update here if that works.
 

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for what it's worth, I just "finished" the install of my swivel on the passenger side. I figured out the zip-tie the motor up to the seat trick by myself before I saw this thread. Problem is, when you move the seat up and down, it pulls the motor up and down with it. I couldn't get the zip-tie adjusted such that it pulls the motor up enough to clear in the lowest seat position while also not pulling the motor up excessively in the highest position. So I've decided to replace the swivel bolts with button head bolts to get a little more clearance to the 10-way plastic motor carrier. Will update here if that works.
Correct about the zip tie "solution". I made 1/2" spacers.
152523
 

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I don't know why I can't see a bigger image. I assume these spacers go below the motor and hold it up to clear the bolts on the swivel?
They go between the seat rail and the top plate of the swivel so that there is 1/2" clearance more for the motor and wiring harness. You will need longer m8-1.25 bolts 35mm. The partial holes are to provide clearance for the rivets on the seat rail (I think they normally end up in the slot on the swivel plate).
 

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