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Discussion Starter #1
I need a quick answer if possible. I'm planning on using the Sterling bb1260 to charge 2x100ah Battle Born batteries in my build. Im still researching how to connect the sterling bb1260 to van system (think I read somewhere that connecting to ccp was way to go). My question is, does the sterling connect to the ccp and what gauge wire will I need to use?...I guess thats two questions. I have the dual battery heavy alternator combo. Thanks
 

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Not an answer here, but am interested. I got a couple battleborn also, and was planning on a BB1230.

My motorhome has a cable directly back to the current house batteries and I was just going to insert the B2B in that cable run along with a shutoff so charging only occurs when I want it to.

Good luck with your install.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Im just getting started with my serious research for my electrical. I have my components chosen and I want to purchase them next week. I?m also just about ready to post my diagram for help on connecting. I would like to purchase my b2b wire so I can install in the wall.
 

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i went a little over size on my BBW1260, i used 4 gauge THHN, my Sterling is about 8 feet from the transit battery so you get little voltage drop on the longer runs of wire and you need bigger wire. it is better to go too big then too small.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
i went a little over size on my BBW1260, i used 4 gauge THHN, my Sterling is about 8 feet from the transit battery so you get little voltage drop on the longer runs of wire and you need bigger wire. it is better to go too big then too small.
ranxerox- is your b2b connected to the ccp
 

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On page 5 of your manual (available here) they give recommended wire sizes (with 4 gauge being the largest). I used 4 gauge from each of the three ccps to power my larger BBW12120.

If I were doing it again I might connect directly to the battery terminal.
 

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I plan to connect 4ga to start batteries and use the engine run wire with an override switch in it to disable the charging when desired. The jumper on the Sterling terminal strip will be removed and the terminal will be wired to a +12 volt when engine is running point, that my switch can disconnect. Will probably use a ccp switch for this.
 

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I plan to connect 4ga to start batteries and use the engine run wire with an override switch in it to disable the charging when desired. The jumper on the Sterling terminal strip will be removed and the terminal will be wired to a +12 volt when engine is running point, that my switch can disconnect. Will probably use a ccp switch for this.
That's what I did on my 2016. I used an upfitter switch output through a relay triggered by the engine run signal to control the charger.
 

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i believe in the KISS concept, Keep It Simple Stupid, (the more complicated something becomes the more likely is is to fail) the paperwork that came with my Sterling said there is no need it to wire it an ignition switched +12 source, and that the Sterling only turns itself On when the vehicle battery voltage rises above a certain threshold. so far this has worked for me, no dead starting batteries yet.
while some may argue that the small amount of voltage the Sterling draws as an sensing voltage may cause the start battery to go dead if the vehicle is not used for a while.
if i store the transit for a while i will just turn off the easy to reach circuit breaker i have installed on the side of the drivers seat, of course i might forget...
 

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Waiting to finish my battery cabinet, but my Sterling 1260 wiring plan is as follows:

200A MRBF fuse on starter battery (+) terminal leading to a two way switch (2 gauge wire).

Leg 1 off of switch goes to B2B charger which is connected to house battery on 70 Amp fuse (6 gauge wire)
Leg 2 off switch goes direct to house battery (+) (2 gauge wire).

Everything connected to common ground.

The idea behind the switch is that I can isolate the B2B if I ever need to, but can also use the house battery to 'jump start' the starter battery in an emergency.
 

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I plan to connect 4ga to start batteries and use the engine run wire with an override switch in it to disable the charging when desired. The jumper on the Sterling terminal strip will be removed and the terminal will be wired to a +12 volt when engine is running point, that my switch can disconnect. Will probably use a ccp switch for this.
Just finishing a Sterling BBW1260 (*BB1260*) install for our Sprinter. I removed the jumper and connected the trigger (center) terminal to the common of a SPDT center off dash switch. One side of the switch goes back to complete the jumper circuit. The other goes to an ignition feed. This way I can run the charger on automatic, ignition trigger, or conceivably 'off' (0V) although I have not verified the 'off' configuration with Sterling tech support. They call it 'sleep'. We have a maintenance charger on the chassis battery which raises the voltage and would make the Sterling come on if in 'AUTO' mode. That would not be good because then the small maintenance charger would be trying to charge the house bank also. Those are maintained by the larger Magnum inverter/charger.

We also have the Sterling remote which is nice for configuring the unit and monitoring voltages/performance. I did also program the charger with the magnet. I removed it from the cover and taped to a stick which made triggering the magnetic switch a little easier. And don't need to remove the cover to do it. Just need to not loose my magnet stick.

I used 2 gauge welding cable since I may someday upgrade to lithium batteries and/or separate alternator and will want more charge current in that case. I connected the positive cable directly to the alternator with a 80A terminal fuse as specified by Sterling. (not sure if this can be done on a Transit but does allow the house charge current to bypass all factory chassis cables and connections - so they avoid the added load) The house side is also fused with 60A. The charger is mounted under the vehicle and all the cables are run underneath as well. I also ran a dedicated negative cable from the engine (near alternator) to the house shunt with a chassis ground located near the charger. (The charger has a fused negative lead which goes to chassis)

photos over at our Sprinter build: https://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=27822&page=92 (scroll down a bit)

We have a Ctek 'off road' system on our Transit. It does have a slight advantage in that it keeps the chassis battery topped off (using solar) as well.
 

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Seems like most of you bypassed the CCP. Is this simply to bypass the amp limit placed on the CCP by the fuse?

Edit: I also noticed that the sterling website indicates the B2B rating should be higher than that of the alternator. My thinking was that connecting directly to the ccp would enable one to fulfill this requirement, since the amp generated would be limited to that of the ccp

Edit 2: attached image from sterling that I was referencing
 

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Seems like most of you bypassed the CCP. Is this simply to bypass the amp limit placed on the CCP by the fuse ...
I think some people bypass the single cpp to avoid Ford's fuse which is hard to replace. Bypassing the triple cpp also simplifies wiring a bit.

... I also noticed that the sterling website indicates the B2B rating should be higher than that of the alternator. My thinking was that connecting directly to the ccp would enable one to fulfill this requirement, since the amp generated would be limited to that of the ccp

Edit 2: attached image from sterling that I was referencing
That image seems to contradict the installation diagrams in my manual. Can you provide a link to the source webpage?
 

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Seems like most of you bypassed the CCP. Is this simply to bypass the amp limit placed on the CCP by the fuse?

Edit: I also noticed that the sterling website indicates the B2B rating should be higher than that of the alternator. My thinking was that connecting directly to the ccp would enable one to fulfill this requirement, since the amp generated would be limited to that of the ccp

Edit 2: attached image from sterling that I was referencing
We bypass the (hard to replace) fuse but typically don't try to exceed the CCP current limits for the particular van. 60A per CCP and if you have 3 then more but no sure it's wise (or how) to draw 180A at once. This is one of the primary reasons to use a current limiting DC to DC charger. To limit current to the house so the chassis (alternator) is not overloaded. It is important to remember that the house battery SOC and active house loads determine the amount of current demanded via the DC to DC charger. It's not the alternator pushing whatever it has available. The amount of current is set (demanded) by the loads (not the source) and limited by the charging device.

So fuse and breaker sizes are usually somewhat higher than the expected highest draw (ie: large house load or battery with low SOC) as long as that is not much higher than the CCP capacity. . The cables size selected should be according to the load and total length of run (positive and negative - including distance along chassis if used as a ground path.) Fuses should be located near the voltage/current source so for DC to DC charging/combining systems that is at both ends.

We have a 60A Sterling DC to DC charger in our Sprinter van and they call for 80A fuses. We have the Ctek of road kit in our Transit with 1 CCP and we have that limited with a 60A breaker because the Ctek can actually pass more and we don't want to allow that. So in that case we would trip the breaker (to protect the van) and have to either reduce the house load or charge the house batteries ( likely with very low SOC) using shore power. In practice this doesn't happen because we keep our batteries from dropping to low SOC - by using solar and DC to DC charging from the alternator. So that brings us back to the reason for these systems. -to take best advantage of charge sources when available.

Try to minimize the run from the charger to the house batteries as the voltage drop along that wire will decrease the charger's ability to acheive 100% SOC. If the run is long then a separate sense wire is often used. That too should be fused (3A) where it connects to the battery.
 

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See "pure sine vehicle powered inverter" in following link:

http://www.ortontransit.info/electric.php

I used the three 60 amp CCP terminals. Ran 3 cables to a 4 position bus bar. 4th post used to feed fuse, on/off switch and then the inverter. Fused at 150 amps. The draw on the alternator is limited by the loads. Only one load can be powered at a time by using a 4 position selector switch. 700 watts for charging or 625 watts for water heating or 750 watts for a electric air heater.

The cord from the vehicle powered inverter to the rear mounted charger is 14/3 because it is 120 volt AC and not 12 volt DC.
 

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perhaps a silly question:

I have not added solar yet but once I do, why couldn't I just splice it into the van batteries and the sterling would handle it as if it where power coming from the alternator?

**That is rather then getting a separate solar charge controller?
 

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Solar panel voltage levels vary too much.

Ctek and Kisae (and perhaps others) have DC to DC chargers that also have an input for solar panels. (max panel voltage <24V)
 

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tthrsn - I obtained that image from the 50 amp non waterproof b2b page, its just one of the images for the unit on the page. I agree that it seems odd.

sterling-power-usa.com/SterlingPower12volt-12volt45ampbatterytobatterycharger.aspx (I cannot post full links due to low post count)

Hein - Thank you for breaking that all down to the basics for me, that was super helpful. I very much appreciate it.

orton - That makes sense to put a fuse/breaker lower than the capacity of the CCP on the power draw, so that way the CCP fuses are never broken.

I guess for my system (regular alternator and 60amp CCP) it comes down to two choices:

A) 50 amp B2B with a 60 amp breaker, wired to CCP or bypass
B) 60 amp B2B, 70 amp breaker, bypassing CCP.

Anyone have any thoughts on how risky option B is? Theoretically it would not draw above 60amp unless the device malfunctions, I suppose.
 
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