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On the next build, I'm considering using a Bluetti or a Jackery or a Goal Zero portable power station for several reasons: I like the idea of being able to easily remove the unit during winter months; It would be great to save the space required for the usual full panel array of parts and pieces required by a battery set-up; And, it seems like it's actually cheaper in dollars and labor.
Each of these units have plenty of ports for AC, DC or USB cords. But what about loads that are usually hard-wired like the roof fan and the counter outlets and the LED lights? How do these connect to the power station?
Thanks for any advice.
 

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U8U 350 HD Ext. DRW HR
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Plan on doing that as well due to not being any kind of electrician. Might even get a station for the front and get a smaller one for the back. Like the idea of being able to move them around.

As to fan I'm getting it put on with a plug in for the back of van or for the power station. My lights are just magnetic can lights. I'm just a camper, not full time living in van.

But have not taken first camping trip yet due to heat. We'll see in the fall how that goes, then might make adjustments.
 

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22 148 Cargo M Roof AWD Oxford white .
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Going with power station also, is it possible to plug in bus bar and then wire in
multiple devices to bar like a diesel heater, fridge , lites, maxx fan ??
electrical stuff not my thing :unsure:
 

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2022 AWD MR Cargo Eco Boost Abyss Gray
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I've been using a Goal Zero 3000x and have been loving it. The goal zero attaches to a fuse block that powers all of my 12v (Fan, lights, heater), and it's powered by 200 watts of solar. Recently found out that the Yeti Car Link doesn't work with a smart alternator so I am working on another solution for that. Overall I would go the Goal Zero route again for simplicity and size. I'll make a quick video of the set up and post it here when it's loaded. Cheers.
 

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I'm using a Bluetti AC200 to power my van. The Bluetti has two 12V outputs which I wired to two BlueSea fuse blocks. The 12V outputs are 12V/10A and 12V/25A. I run a refrigerator, two Maxxair fans, a water pump, LED lights and some USB power outlets.

I installed a 1000W pure sine Renogy inverter to provide 120VAC from the van battery. I made a switch box so that I can choose between charging the Bluetti from the van inverter or from shore power.

This system has worked very well. I still plan to add two 100W solar panels to provide some charge for the Bluetti.
 

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I went with a split system - mostly because it was a post build add-on. I just added a 720WH Ecoflow River Pro, to drive our Starlink and laptops for a new use for the van - mobile office mode.
The fan, heater, lights, water pump, charge ports etc., were already hard wired to the OEM dual batteries, 3 years ago and work fine.
I added both ignition-switched and permanently on 12V receptacles to the rear, so our Ecoflow plugs into the ignition switched one. Part of my thinking is that I want to be able to pull the Ecoflow out of the van and combine it with our gas generator for when we have the inevitable power outages at home.
 

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You need to provide some ventilation for the compartment where you install the solar generator. I installed a 4" grill for an air inlet and this 4" USB powered vent fan for an air outlet. The fan is plugged into a USB outlet on the Bluetti. This has provided plenty of air flow, even in very hot weather.

 

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2018 350 XLT 3.5L
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I don't have a smart alternator so I used the Link, I also connected mine to a battery selector switch so when I take it out in the winter, I could still use my accessories off of the starter battery if desired. I opted for an RF/Bluetooth 6 switch bank so I could do away with wiring to every switch as well. Setup has worked well so far! Goal Zero House Electrical Wiring Feedback
 

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nothing yet, but planning on an EV van
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a small blurb from my longer thread, skip down to post #4:

"i was originally assuming i would just build my own battery pack, charging system [both shore, van and solar], battery management system, inverter, monitors, fuses, safety, etc... however, the 'portable'/backup battery power systems has exploded in the past few years. there are lots out there and what's nice is they are complete systems. i would have a hard time beating the prices with my own custom system"

since i will have lots of solar and huge vehicle battery under the floor, i'm doing everything at 120v and 240v
 

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I'm running my van from a GZ Yeti 1500X. That powers fans, fridge (Norcold NR75), lights, a couple USB ports I built in. It's good for about 2 days of full autonomy without any charging. If I were doing it again I might consider the 3000X.

A few pointers:
-Make sure whatever you get has a high power output. The 1500X has a 12V/30A Anderson/Powerpole port. I made a custom connector to attach this to the bus bar of a Blue Sea fusebox, which distributes to the rest of the van. This is actually really easy, just get some 10 AWG wire, a couple ring connectors, and an Anderson plug kit.

-As Broken and Costal mentions, the Yeti Link doesn't work with the Transit's smart alternator. He and I are probably working on the same hack to fix this; you can read about the tribulations here. If you want to charge from the engine while driving, you can use the GZ car charger, but it's slow (120 watt max). Further info once I get some parts in to address this.

-Set up a shore power plug to keep the GZ charged. I installed mine under the left rear corner of the van, easy to plug in when van is in my driveway.

-If you're running a fridge, it's a good idea to get an AC/DC model. The Norcold I have will default to AC power if available, if not it's DC. I plugged a splitter into my shore power line and connected that to the fridge. This way when it's plugged in, the fridge (by far your biggest load on the battery) is running off shore power, not the battery; this saves you charge cycles when the van is plugged in.

-I initially thought I'd just use the USB and AC outputs on the battery, but this is kind of a PITA. You really want the battery mounted somewhere secure and low to the ground, as it's very heavy and you wouldn't want it flying around in an accident. I ended up wiring some USB ports in various places around the van, and ran an extension cord from the AC output of the battery to a permanently installed AC plug at counter level. Avoid combo AC/USB plugs, as they have substantial parasitic draw.
 

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Ecoflow out of the van and combine it with our gas generator for when we have the inevitable power outages at home.
I didn't even bother w/ splitting it up, I just made my whole house system modular for this reason, but also for pulling it out of the van in the winter so I'm not freezing the batteries on a regular basis.

At some point in the past, I entertained the idea of going for a full split phase setup, and rolling it out of the van for house backup, but it was too much scope creep.
 

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22 148 Cargo M Roof AWD Oxford white .
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thanks You all for sharing this very good info and looking
forward to more (y)
 

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I use the 300-watt jackery. If no Shore power at night I connect it to the 18 inch oscillating fan and a small refrigerator freezer cooler. Charge it off the van during the day. It will charge off 12 or 120 volt. The cooler freezer will run off of 12 volt also. Or 120 at night if available.
 

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nothing yet, but planning on an EV van
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I didn't even bother w/ splitting it up, I just made my whole house system modular for this reason, but also for pulling it out of the van in the winter so I'm not freezing the batteries on a regular basis.

At some point in the past, I entertained the idea of going for a full split phase setup, and rolling it out of the van for house backup, but it was too much scope creep.
i'm thinking about doing the opposite, getting a decent sized split phase setup and experimenting with in the house and my roof top solar before moving it to the van.
 

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i'm thinking about doing the opposite, getting a decent sized split phase setup and experimenting with in the house and my roof top solar before moving it to the van.
Any idea what you're looking at so far?

I've kept everything 12v, but a few times a month, I get pangs of anxiety that I should've gone at least 24v so I could support bigger inverters (without being at 1200A...not that I have enough battery anyway).

I may end up with two inverters too, the larger 6kW+ transformer inverters draw something silly like 150W at idle.
 

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Any idea what you're looking at so far?

I've kept everything 12v, but a few times a month, I get pangs of anxiety that I should've gone at least 24v so I could support bigger inverters (without being at 1200A...not that I have enough battery anyway).

I may end up with two inverters too, the larger 6kW+ transformer inverters draw something silly like 150W at idle.
 
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