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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone thought about altering the intake vents when their engine overheats?
The European versions have the mesh hood vent cover and air intake on the passenger side (their driver side).
I can't seem to find that part on any European parts sites.
My thought is....if engine overheats, replace passenger side vent cover with meshed screen version, remove backside cover from driver's side, and place a blockage in the the passageway inside the hood.
Air for intake is now coming through the passenger side vent, the heat from engine bay can escape via the now open driver's side vent, and no accidental heat can be transferred through the hood passageway to the intake side.

Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not with 4 kids.
I have the 3.7l
Seems like the engine overheating is a 3.5l issue.
But if I am pulling and there is overheating, this wood be a quick and temporary fix.
 

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Concept makes sense to me. Race cars use extraction vents to increase air flow through the radiator. Depending on the factory's design, the engine compartment can become a high pressure zone at speed, limiting air flow through the radiator. Especially if the the same guy who designed the Transit air filter box worked on our engine compartment air flow.

However, aerodynamics over the car surfaces becomes complicated. For example, the area at the base of the windshield becomes a high pressure zone at speed. Which is why Ford put the HVAC air intake vent there. Putting an engine compartment vent in that location could just pressurize the engine compartment further - actually reducing air flow through the radiator.

You need to do air pressure and flow measurements on the hood and in the engine compartment. Random hole placement may not do what you think it would do. https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/forum/grm/learn-me-hood-ventsextractors/110468/page1/

Edit: I just saw @CrewVanMan's post on his ramair intake using your idea. I assume his intake works since the base of the windshield is usually a high pressure zone. So using the vent for air extraction would not work. You would need your extraction vent near the front of the hood which is usually a low pressure zone. The Grassrootsmotorsports thread links to here: http://www.autospeed.com/cms/article.html?&title=Undertrays-Spoilers-Bonnet-Vents-Part-1&A=113176
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I uses to own a 79 Trans Am. The original hood scoops were functional because of that high pressure at the base of the windshield.

The easiest way to test this is to place a thermometer inside the engine area and test drive it before and after the change.
Also watch the coolant temp with the obd2.

I "believe" that the pressure under the hood is significantly greater than at the external side of the hood.
 

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I "believe" that the pressure under the hood is significantly greater than at the external side of the hood.
I don't know but I would think that it's lower in the engine bay. The entire bottom of the bay is open and air pressure under the car should be lower - which promotes air flow through the radiator.

You can measure air pressures on top of the hood and inside the engine bay before making any changes as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Try heat sinks. Water,oil, trans. Keep heat out of the radiator, when possible. Cheap and effective.
Trans cooler is on my to do list of to do items.
I brought this idea up as a possibility for everyone...especially 3.5l ecoboost owners as they seem to have the most issue with engine heat. (More hp = more geat)

Many people believe that the side vents on sports cars were about heat reduction. They were about reducing air pressures under the hood that are capable of lifting the front of the car to the point of steering loss.
But those vents face rearward.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So my next question is....does anyone know how to get the passenger side mesh screen vent cover like European's?
 

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What is this overheating issue? I just did 1300 miles on and off-road in the NV desert in record temperatures with zero overheating in my 2019 T250 148"MR 3.5 EcoBoosted 4x4
 

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Are people seeing overheating on the dash gauge or with a scan tool? We just towed a 10 foot trailer in our loaded out, 12000 pounds GCWR, 2019 EL HR 3.5 Eco from sea level to 6000 ft. The dash gauge never moved the entire trip.
 

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I don't know of any actual reports of overheating. This is just speculation on a weak point of the transit compared to the F150 which has larger radiator and trans oil cooler.
 

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Are people seeing overheating on the dash gauge or with a scan tool? We just towed a 10 foot trailer in our loaded out, 12000 pounds GCWR, 2019 EL HR 3.5 Eco from sea level to 6000 ft. The dash gauge never moved the entire trip.
As someone who had an engine replaced, 3.5l eco, at 4500 miles after crossing the Nevada desert to Arizona from California, you NEVER want to trust your temperature gauge on the dash. Mine showed normal Then a defective (I think) casting of the block caused a transfer of fluids under the extreme temp not showing on the gauge. It went into limp home mode as passing a truck at 60 and almost caused multiple accidents just outside of Flagstaff at 6500'.

get and OBD2 scanner at least to watch the actual temperature.
 
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