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Propex hs2211. Exterior mounted so saves precious floor space. Also got a DOT propane tank, mounted under the floor, so all my propane connections are exterior. Zero leak risk and no need for a fancy sealed propane box.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I have an Espar that heats the interior via a Rixen heat exchange system. Worked great during several ski trips, super efficient, no interior combustion, and supposedly adjusts to elevation. I'm also in Bend if you want a quick peek. My install was done by Van Specialties in PDX, FWIW.
Would be great to take a look at your setup!
Thanks for the feedback everyone, really appreciate it.
I am leaning towards a gas and diesel combo heater system. It would be nice to have a back up if one fails. I have gravitated away from the wood burning stove even though the ambience would be awesome. This is some exciting stuff, can't wait!
 

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I have bounced around a lot on my heater choice, but I think I am going to end up going with the Truma Combi 4E. It is expensive and large, but it doubles as a water heater and runs on propane. This will require me to have a gas locker, but I think I will need one anyway. It looks like a great unit that does not have problems at altitude, heats my water, and I can plug it in while at home to maintain a minimum temperature through our Wisconsin winter.
 

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You have to change Orifices to use propane appliances at High Altitude.

 

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I have bounced around a lot on my heater choice, but I think I am going to end up going with the Truma Combi 4E. It is expensive and large, but it doubles as a water heater and runs on propane. This will require me to have a gas locker, but I think I will need one anyway. It looks like a great unit that does not have problems at altitude, heats my water, and I can plug it in while at home to maintain a minimum temperature through our Wisconsin winter.
Their website indicates 230 volt. Is it also available in 110 volt?
 

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You have to change Orifices to use propane appliances at High Altitude.

The article you cite says that changing orifices "may" be necessary, it does not say that you "have" to. It also says that adjusting air intake may be sufficient and that one should consult their manual.
 

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The article you cite says that changing orifices "may" be necessary, it does not say that you "have" to. It also says that adjusting air intake may be sufficient and that one should consult their manual.
It has been said by others on this forum in the past that they had to change propane orifices for high altitude operation, I guess it just depends on what your idea of high altitude is.

 

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Sorry I missed this one. Here is a link tot he Truma Combi 4e for US market: Truma Combi 4 eco plus Propane & 120V Combination Furnace and Water Heater Kit

Like I said, not cheap, but I think it is a great unit (on paper).
FYI got a very fast response from Truma regarding operation at altitude:

Hi Ken,
The Truma Combi LPG unit is self adjusting, so theoretically it does not have an operational altitude limit.
However as less oxygen is available at significantly higher altitudes output may be reduced below rated BTU.

Thanks,
Tom
TrumaHeaters.com
 

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I can confirm that the Truma works without any problems at altitude. I used my Truma for several months in Bolivia, Peru and other South American countries at altitudes between 10,000 and over 15,000 ft. without problems. I didn't detect a reduced output but the van is well insulated and I might have missed it.
 
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