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Ford Transit Trail and its unique options & price!

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We NOW have the information for the 2023 Ford Transit Trail model and with the video, we now can see what one looks like. Here is the listing of the option and what makes up this particular option.

*Transit Trail (47N)
Availability:
  • Cargo van...ONLY body style
  • 3.5L EcoBoost engine (99G)
  • AWD model
*Medium and High roof models with 148" Wheelbase and High roof 148" Wheelbase/Extended Length
* 9,500 GVWR body codes / W2C, W2X, and W3U

Includes:

  • 3.5" body lift with improved ground clearance, approach and departure angles
  • 2.75" increase in frontal and rear track width
  • Unique Transit Trail badge
  • 16" Transit Trail Black Alloy Wheels
  • 245/75 R16 Goodyear Wrangler Workhorse All Terrain Tire
  • Slider Style Side Steps (Driver & Passenger sides)
  • Unique Black Transit Trail Grille with integrated grille lamps
  • Black HID Headlamps (91C)
  • Unique Skid Plate Style Front Bumper
  • Unique Transit Trail Splash Guards and Wheel Arch Cladding
  • Front Wheel Arch Liners
  • Intelligent Access with Push Button Start (41J)
  • Blind Spot Assist 1.0 (65A)
  • Front Fog Lamps (55D)
  • Auxiliary Fuse Panel with High Spec Interface Connector (87E)
  • Dark Palazzo Gray Cloth, 4 way manual Swivel Driver & Passenger Seats (21T)
  • SYNC4 with Sirius XM, 360L, HD Radio, and 12" Display (58C)
  • High Resolution Digital Camera (61E)
  • Power Outlet - 110V/400W (90D)
  • Power Point - 12V (87A)
  • Front Overhead Shelf (66D)
  • Reverse Sensing System (43R)
  • Side Sensing System (94A)
  • Fixed Rear Cargo Door Glass and Fixed Passenger Side Glass (17B)
  • Illuminated Sun Visors (85C)
  • Adaptive Cruise Control (60D) except w/ Audio package 58F
  • Privacy Glass (92E)
  • Dual AGM Batteries (63E)
  • Keyless Entry Pad (52C)
  • Dual Note Horns (85D)
  • B-Pillar Assist Handle (41B)
  • Heavy-Duty Trailer Tow package (53B)
    Upgradeable Features/Options
    (additional charge options)
  • Roof Vent (76B)
  • Extended Range Fuel Tank (655)
  • SYNC4 with Sirius XM, 360L, HD Radio with Navigation, Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control (iACC) and 12" Audio Package (58F)
  • 360 Degree Camera with Split View feature and Front Washer (61D)
  • Upfitter Package (67C)
  • Ebony Leather, 10 way Power Heated Driver & Passenger seats (21S)
NON Available Options
* Remote Start (68B)
* Heavy-Duty Cargo Flooring (60B)
* Exterior Upgrade Package - SRW (18D)/ DRW (18L)
* Rear View Display in Rear View Mirror (61B)
* MyKey (62B)
* Rear Bumper Delete (43F)
* Interior Upgrade Package (96C)
* Load Area Protection Package (96D)
* Reverse Brake Assist (43S)
* 'E' Transit
* Front/Rear A/C with floor heat (57G)
* Bulkheads - Options (47T) and (47U)
* Heavy-Duty Scuff Plate Kit (85B)
* Enhanced Active Park Assist (94B)
* Virtual Rear View Mirror (90C)
* ANY Factory Running Boards (68H) (68L) (68J)
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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
I am using 2 Transit Trail orders as copies for building out new Transit Trail orders. They are ordered as stock units. I have about 17 total orders now in the system. A few are converted retail customer orders if they have the correct body codes. Any thing else would be a stock ordered unit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #104 ·
You have to delete the Extended Length Running Boards from the order to get the Transit Trail option to process. The Transit Trail has its own style running boards or something that fits in the same position on the van.
 

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Wow, this replaces the Adventure Prep Package that was $3,995 in '21 and $4895 in '22
High value adds include the lift, enlarged tires, alloy rims, swivel seats, side steps, extra trim, ('22 change, sync 4 12" from sync 3 8") and tow package.
$7725 extra value?
I can get to +$5k value.
I'm wondering if anyone has done a math subtraction exercise--subtracting the known costs of otherwise available options on other Transits, to get the price of the Trail specific items (I'd exclude the grill from this)--so I'm thinking body lift and wheels/tires (the running boards could probable be considered "similar" in price to the extended length running boards at $665).

I have a current 2023 Transit ordered submitted, and the differences in non-unique options between my build and my build made compliant with the Trail package are adaptive cruise (vs regular cruise on my build), the aforementioned extended running boards, black HID vs silver HID, dual note horn, and power outlet. My non-Trail build had power seats but of course not the swivel--call that a wash (price wise). And my build is the heavy duty single rear wheel configuration.

The MSRP on my build is $67375, and the new build $72310. So this suggests that the lift, the wheels/tires, the unique front grill with charge cooler plastic "slider" protection, horn, black HIDs, and power outlet is $5 grand. That is one spendy body lift. Of course, I'm sure I am missing some things.
 

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I'm wondering if anyone has done a math subtraction exercise--subtracting the known costs of otherwise available options on other Transits, to get the price of the Trail specific items (I'd exclude the grill from this)--so I'm thinking body lift and wheels/tires (the running boards could probable be considered "similar" in price to the extended length running boards at $665).
I have a W3U 2023 on order so I could have switched so I did the math. Base price of the W3U increased $1500. I then subtracted out the price for 4 wheels and tires that are comparable to the Transit Trail (I used the retail price of the Goodyear they speced). Subtracted the price for a VanCompass 2.0 lift and installation (because there is an installer near me). Minus the price for a raptor style grill and install.

The price difference between my original order (+ wheels/tires + lift + grill) and the Trail: $12 That was it.
Getting the Trail I would have lost: Reverse Brake Assist, Virtual Review Mirror, and Remote Start (all not available on the Trail).
I would have gained: Factory warranty on the lift and 3 windows.
I do not want the windows.
So I am sticking to my original order.
 
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I'm wondering if anyone has done a math subtraction exercise--subtracting the known costs of otherwise available options on other Transits, to get the price of the Trail specific items (I'd exclude the grill from this)--so I'm thinking body lift and wheels/tires (the running boards could probable be considered "similar" in price to the extended length running boards at $665).

I have a current 2023 Transit ordered submitted, and the differences in non-unique options between my build and my build made compliant with the Trail package are adaptive cruise (vs regular cruise on my build), the aforementioned extended running boards, black HID vs silver HID, dual note horn, and power outlet. My non-Trail build had power seats but of course not the swivel--call that a wash (price wise). And my build is the heavy duty single rear wheel configuration.

The MSRP on my build is $67375, and the new build $72310. So this suggests that the lift, the wheels/tires, the unique front grill with charge cooler plastic "slider" protection, horn, black HIDs, and power outlet is $5 grand. That is one spendy body lift. Of course, I'm sure I am missing some things.
Parts and labor looks about a wash, price-wise. Advantages include engineering Ford added to assure compatibility, electronic systems tuning, warranty, dealer support/repairable, time saved, insurance covered, and resale value. Hard to price these.
 

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Sorry if this has already been asked, but do we know if the Trail will be fall under a passenger van or commercial van? Makes a big difference when it comes to financing.
 

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If they made this in a crew version I'd consider ordering one and I just got a 2022!
I like that idea of a Ford Transit Crew Trail. I like the idea of a converting bench/sleeper. I also like a bulkhead behind the bench seat with a opening window to allow for reaching to get something or allow heat/AC to flow through. I seen some Pinterest ideas for rear storage like cabinets above along the wall and around the wheel wells which would allow for platform panels for items under or on top of the panels or bedding on top. I sort like a heavy duty front push bumper and a rear bumper with a swing storage box and swing spare tire holder.
 

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2018 T350HD Dual Sliders - SOLD
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Sorry if this has already been asked, but do we know if the Trail will be fall under a passenger van or commercial van? Makes a big difference when it comes to financing.

Thats not decided by Ford, thats decided by the rules in your state/province and to some degree the knowledge, or lack thereof, of the clerk at the DMV. My T350HD dually was registered as a personal vehicle in TN. A friend bought a T250 non extended and his was commercial.
 

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Sorry if this has already been asked, but do we know if the Trail will be fall under a passenger van or commercial van? Makes a big difference when it comes to financing.
If you are referring to retail vs commercial titled/registered, might vary by state. My dealer indicated my new cargo van purchase would be a retail purchase and licensed, so should be regular insurance and I imagine financing would be the same. I was worried a cargo van would automatically be classified as commercial until I could get the title changed to rv classified. Maybe RV designation could be even lower cost insurance.
 

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I own a 2021 Ford Transit all wheel drive. My husband ordered without the glass on the side door slider. To this day we regret that decision. (He was after the added security of no glass) THE DRIVER CAN NOT SEE ONCOMING TRAFFIC FROM THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE VECHICLE. Often the passenger has to play lookout. We discussed adding a camera on the passenger side of the van. Not a serious problem if one takes extreme care when backing out.
We had some heavy florida rains and made the decision to drive off road on our property. The all wheel drive kept kicking in and out, even set for mud, and low range. We barely got back on the road. The dealership was not surprised when we brought up the subject. If you read the manual, no more than two miles of driving on the beach. We are experienced off roaders. We do not plan on experiencing and more off road driving with this van. I only bring this up to possibly someone getting stuck out in the woods.
Overall, we like the van for camping and traveling across country. It does a good job towing a loaded trailer. We would buy a 4 wheel drive if we wanted to go do more off road stuff.
 

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I own a 2021 Ford Transit all wheel drive. My husband ordered without the glass on the side door slider. To this day we regret that decision. (He was after the added security of no glass) THE DRIVER CAN NOT SEE ONCOMING TRAFFIC FROM THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE VECHICLE. Often the passenger has to play lookout. We discussed adding a camera on the passenger side of the van. Not a serious problem if one takes extreme care when backing out.
We had some heavy florida rains and made the decision to drive off road on our property. The all wheel drive kept kicking in and out, even set for mud, and low range. We barely got back on the road. The dealership was not surprised when we brought up the subject. If you read the manual, no more than two miles of driving on the beach. We are experienced off roaders. We do not plan on experiencing and more off road driving with this van. I only bring this up to possibly someone getting stuck out in the woods.
Overall, we like the van for camping and traveling across country. It does a good job towing a loaded trailer. We would buy a 4 wheel drive if we wanted to go do more off road stuff.
I would add that the factory glass is a good value compared to aftermarket options (price, labor, service). The slider glass is laminated so safer, better at sound blocking and robust for door slams compared to opening type windows.
 

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Having no glass in the sliding door is not really a problem; cargo/delivery vans all around the world seem to manage just fine. The only situation where it can be an issue is at an intersection where the roadways don't meet 90° to each other, like at the bottom of my street/hill where we approach the intersection at a 45° angle. As long as I "square" my van up to the other street I can see if there's any traffic or pedestrians to my right.

As my Transit (originally ordered18 months ago now) will be my work van for a few years before I convert it to a travel van, I ordered it without any additional windows.

I'd like to look at upgrading to the Trail since my body code is W3U but I don't really want the extra glass and by now the price tag is probably approching $100K Canadian! I wish Ford offered the option of having an additional alloy wheel and full size spare. As well as being superior to the factory spare it could also be included in regular tire rotations so wouldn't be wasted. I originally ordered the van with forged wheels in 21 and looked into this at that time. I was told that one additional wheel (without the tire) was going to be $2K! Clearly, Ford didn't like the idea.
 

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made the decision to drive off road on our property. The all wheel drive kept kicking in and out, even set for mud, and low range. We barely got back on the road. The dealership was not surprised when we brought up the subject. If you read the manual, no more than two miles of driving on the beach. We are experienced off roaders. We do not plan on experiencing and more off road driving with this van. I only bring this up to possibly someone getting stuck out in the woods.
Overall, we like the van for camping and traveling across country. It does a good job towing a loaded trailer. We would buy a 4 wheel drive if we wanted to go do more off road stuff.
A bit off topic for this thread but I'd like to comment on the above. Apologies for the wordy post, I talk too much :) Feel free to DM me for more info.

1) The AWD is constantly on, it does not kick in and out. Especially in MudRuts mode, it sends torque to the front axle all the time. Unfortunately the front diff is open (not locking or limited slip) and sometimes the brake controls can struggle to prevent one wheel from slipping. The AWD is still sending torque but it's escaping through the diff to a slipping wheel. A 4x4 would behave exactly the same with an open front diff and brake controls not tuned for aggressive off road driving.

If the rear wheels are slipping without either of the front wheels turning then yes, AWD is not performing well. In this case the system should "kick on" with additional torque to stop the slip. This is sometimes apparent on slippery surfaces if you have the steering wheel turned; the AWD system slip response may pulse or oscillate, giving the impression it's kicking on/off. This is a necessary evil of the way fulltime AWD systems operate.

In your off road experience I suspect the AWD torque was working well but the front diff was allowing one/both of the front wheels to slip. I'd welcome more details on your experience.

By the way did "AWD Temporarily Disabled" ever display in your cluster?

2) Driving/creeping through mud is very different than two miles in deep sand. Sand driving is super tough for heavy commercial vehicles, mostly because of the very high placard tire pressures. It takes a toll on the whole powertrain from the engine through to the axles. Decreasing tire pressures during careful, low-speed driving on sand dramatically reduces the power/effort required to drive and trust me when I say your AWD can drive basically indefinitely on sand if you run tire pressures in the 20-30psi range. Obviously be aware of things like speed and vehicle weight and always be careful.

3) When you say Low Range I assume you mean manual mode / first gear on the transmission? The AWD system doesn't offer a low range but even if it did, that wouldn't be the best setting for mud. Leave it in Drive (or at least 2nd/3rd gear) and let some revs and vehicle speed build up. Remember this 10-speed has extremely short gears compared to a 5/6 speed, so first gear is almost a crawl gear. For mud you want more speed and momentum.
 

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Thats not decided by Ford, thats decided by the rules in your state/province and to some degree the knowledge, or lack thereof, of the clerk at the DMV. My T350HD dually was registered as a personal vehicle in TN. A friend bought a T250 non extended and his was commercial.
If you are referring to retail vs commercial titled/registered, might vary by state. My dealer indicated my new cargo van purchase would be a retail purchase and licensed, so should be regular insurance and I imagine financing would be the same. I was worried a cargo van would automatically be classified as commercial until I could get the title changed to rv classified. Maybe RV designation could be even lower cost insurance.
Thanks guys,
When I bought my 2018 T350 Cargo (in California) I had to purchase as a commercial vehicle. I was told it was tied to the VIN#. Also very few companies would offer financing on the van. So assuming that the Trail will be an empty van to start. I'm curious how it will be treated.
 

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2021 Crew Van AWD, EcoBoost, 148, HR, Adventure Package
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You couldn’t pay me to get an unreliable sprinter with a terribly underpowered engine.

even though it’s annoying, probably wouldn’t be very difficult to replace the fixed passenger glass with an aftermarket one that opens for the slider. Windows get broken all the time
Yea, we drove the Sprinter before deciding on the Transit. The engine was dramatically underpowered. To the point of disbelief! Then we experienced the Ecoboost...ahhhhh :cool:, now that's what I'm talkin' about!
 
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