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Would you upgrade to the RV Prep Package or Adventure Package?

  • Yes, RV Prep Package

    Votes: 2 12.5%
  • Yes, Adventure Package

    Votes: 6 37.5%
  • No, neither

    Votes: 8 50.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone! I'm exploring the DIY route and noticed that Ford offers an RV Prep Package or Adventure Package for the cargo van (long/high roof). Has anyone added either of these upgrades? Why or why not? How about Ford installed dual alternator? I appreciate any input!
 

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2022 148 HR Cargo - Ordered
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I think it is best to figure out what options you want for your van, and then see if going with either of those pasckages saves you money (or gets you some nice extra(s) for the same money). That's what I did and ended up with RV prep.
I'll let more experienced folks respond about the dual alternator (I think most folks don't get it -- dual battery is way more common).
Welcome.

Edit: Adventure package comes with big window on slider, but it does not open -- so you have to go aftermarket if you want one that opens -- I've heard best to get no window there from factory if going with an aftermarket window -- the cutout is different. The RV Package does not require that window. RV package comes with highest end SYNC4 Audio/Navigation/intelligent Cruise Control. No power/heated seats with RV Package. If you get the "order guide," you will see the details, if you have not already. A search should provide.
 

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If the separate options within those 2 packaged options are what you want on your Transit, there is a slight savings going with those packages. You are restricted to take what comes with them and the window configuration on the Adventure Prep package forces you to take the rear door windows and the RH sliding door. Best to look over ALL of the options you want when building out your Transit order sheet and decide if the options you choose will work for your end results.

I just dealt with a customer who took one of the available 2022 model Transit passenger vans and they initially asked about the Livery package. This 12 passenger van had ALL of the options within the Livery packages except the Egress Window which some buyers would not be interested in. I built this particular passenger van based on this choice of options knowing in most cases the future buyer would not want that window and NOT that particular option package.
 

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2015 3.5L EB 148 Highroof Extended
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Sorry I don't know the specifics of each package but I'd go with which ever comes with dual alternator. I got my van used and it's the one option I wish I had. With the correct setup having dual alternators basically eliminates the need for solar. It's also hard (impossible?) and expensive to add the second alternator later.

It's easy to add a solid window to the slider door later and the rear windows may or may be used depending on your build.
 

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2022 148 HR Cargo - Ordered
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Neither come with dual alternator (option 63C) as part of package.
You need the Ecoboost engine. Also not available with a few atypical seating configurations.
 

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I think the guys covered the package's pros and cons fairly well here above. Not many pros. More cons than pros. I would just add to what they have said by highlighting that after having been faced with the same decisions this year myself I found that the cost-saving afforded by these marketing ploys were not significant, or significant enough to make much sense. Which is typically the main or primary reason to go with a bundle in the first place. When you weigh this less than significant cost-saving advantage against the many likely compromises you will likely be left with afterward (such as the fixed window issue mentioned above) it makes either one of these two packages even less desirable.

The dual alternator set-up on the other hand, although not yet fully ironed out yet in terms of full or complete utilization (250Amps x2 makes for some serious surge capacity) is, however, something I did rather eagerly opt for. You'll need to do a bit of a search here to find out some more detail but after doing my own deep-dive on the subject and looking into it a bit more I found this option to be the true RV Adventure Prep Package Item to have in place as part of your build. Well that and AWD of course.
 

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2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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Third? Fourth? Whatever... I agree on the dual-alternator, but not much else. I paid for a bunch of extras when I ordered the 2020 since so many things were new options that year and no-one really knew much how well they'd work or whatever. I didn't use some stuff (upfitter switches and wiring come to mind - I think there were a couple other things) but those won't be the only hundreds of dollars I waste on this project / hobby / keep-me-busy thing.

While the dual-alternator isn't officially sorted on how to get 500A out of it, it delivers 200A at idle connected to the two "customer connection points" provided - and does so with zero effort or drama (no high-idle, no issues with voltage or engine-run in my implementation). Of course, I haven't tried this with a single 250A and a CCP2 output. It might work that way as well? Or just get the second one and be sure. Your call.
 

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2021 W2X T350 148" High Roof, EcoB, AWD, Avalanche Grey, 11/20 order 8/21 delivery
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Like others suggested, went with the adventure prep package after putting my options list together, as it was a close match. I also went dual alternator to hang with the cool power crew.😎

Time was the biggest factor to accepting fixed windows. I was not going to cut holes in doors or roof until much later in my build. Warranty and build logistic choices for my situation. I can't imagine driving a cargo transit without a window in the slider. Those blind left turns are something! Order your after market window when you order your van if you go without fixed glass. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Like others suggested, went with the adventure prep package after putting my options list together, as it was a close match. I also went dual alternator to hang with the cool power crew.😎

Time was the biggest factor to accepting fixed windows. I was not going to cut holes in doors or roof until much later in my build. Warranty and build logistic choices for my situation. I can't imagine driving a cargo transit without a window in the slider. Those blind left turns are something! Order your after market window when you order your van if you go without fixed glass. Good luck.
Hi. Did you build out a campervan? Wondering how you're using the dual alternators. I spoke with two builders today who said they weren't needed. I'm now leaning away from the Adventure Package, which would save $. However, if two alternators will allow me to wait longer on installing solar now, I'm up for it.
 

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Hi. Did you build out a campervan? Wondering how you're using the dual alternators. I spoke with two builders today who said they weren't needed. I'm now leaning away from the Adventure Package, which would save $. However, if two alternators will allow me to wait longer on installing solar now, I'm up for it.
I ordered the dual alternators when there was little "in use" info on them. There are a few threads now that you could search for more info. I'm not at a point in my build to be able to share more info on them. I am trying to avoid solar for a few reasons, including my location in NE. I will be running a b2b charger off ccp1 and have a 2000 watt inverter powered from ccp2. My redundant charging plan will include a 110 volt battery charger powered by the inverter.

There are after market options for a second alternator if more power is needed later. Dual batteries would be a good option for any transit where someone is tapping in for any significant power draw. Good luck with your build order.
 

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I think it is best to figure out what options you want for your van, and then see if going with either of those pasckages saves you money (or gets you some nice extra(s) for the same money). That's what I did and ended up with RV prep.
I'll let more experienced folks respond about the dual alternator (I think most folks don't get it -- dual battery is way more common).
Welcome.

Edit: Adventure package comes with big window on slider, but it does not open -- so you have to go aftermarket if you want one that opens -- I've heard best to get no window there from factory if going with an aftermarket window -- the cutout is different. The RV Package does not require that window. RV package comes with highest end SYNC4 Audio/Navigation/intelligent Cruise Control. No power/heated seats with RV Package. If you get the "order guide," you will see the details, if you have not already. A search should provide.
If what Wyocalm states is true about the window on the slider, I would avoid the package. You want a window that will open and close for ventilation. When I was waiting from Jan to Aug for my 2020 ordered van I was looking for other options and found one with the factory slider door window installed. The factory window does not open and other window providers do not fit in the factory cut out. I told the sales guy I would buy the van if he could provide an installer that could replace the window with one that could open and close to allow venting. He claimed he called many and could not provide an upfitter that could do it. I passed on the van, and I recomend you pass on the factory window that comes with the Adventure Package.
 

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If what Wyocalm states is true about the window on the slider, I would avoid the package. You want a window that will open and close for ventilation...
The fixed slider window is a reason I passed on the Adventure package. However, I see many that many folks do get that fixed window -- I suppose if you have a lot of other aftermarket ventialtion, it could be okay -- it's certainly a big window -- I'm hoping to get as big as I can that will vent.
 

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I have the fixed slider window. It’s great for checking traffic and such. I put in an AMA window on the opposite side that opens. Still a big window but not all of it is see through. Can’t you just open the slider if you want venting? I mean, if you are parked.
 

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Hi. Did you build out a campervan? Wondering how you're using the dual alternators. I spoke with two builders today who said they weren't needed. I'm now leaning away from the Adventure Package, which would save $. However, if two alternators will allow me to wait longer on installing solar now, I'm up for it.
Dual alternators are not needed for 99.9% of camper van builds.

Dual alternators are mostly only useful for industrial applications such as ambulances or heavy tradesmen vans where they are drawing large amounts of power while the engine is idling to run tools such as welders or other machinery.

A single alternator is able to provide a solid 100-120 A, which is plenty for charging even the most ludicrously insane over-the-top battery systems. The vast majority of battery chargers only pull 50-60 amps, well within the capacity of the single alternator.

Dual batteries are pretty useful however, and are included if you get the option for the modified vehicle wiring harness. (which is highly recommended as it makes connecting into the van’s electrical system to charge your house systems a bit easier).
 

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Dual batteries are pretty useful however, and are included if you get the option for the modified vehicle wiring harness. (which is highly recommended as it makes connecting into the van’s electrical system to charge your house systems a bit easier).
How do people utilize the modified vehicle wiring harness to connect to charge to the house system?
 

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How do people utilize the modified vehicle wiring harness to connect to charge to the house system?
My understanding is that "Modified Vehicle Wiring Harness" option is what gives the CCPs, Customer Connection Points under the driver's seat, that are fused and switched to vehicle ignition.

Alternately you can just run a wire directly off a battery terminal and use your own relay/fuse/breaker, but it's a bit cleaner and easier with the CCPs already there.
 

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Dual alternators are mostly only useful for industrial applications such as ambulances or heavy tradesmen vans where they are drawing large amounts of power while the engine is idling to run tools such as welders or other machinery.
...or appliances such as air conditioners or cooktops.
If you idle in the evening, your battery will last further into the night. Even without large consumers, if you aren't driving every day, the duals should make a quick top-off a breeze.
To my eyes, dual alternators seem like a very cost-effective option, depending on your camping habits.
 

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...or appliances such as air conditioners or cooktops.
If you idle in the evening, your battery will last further into the night. Even without large consumers, if you aren't driving every day, the duals should make a quick top-off a breeze.
To my eyes, dual alternators seem like a very cost-ef

Yeah, I have to agree. If you don't see a need in a Camper Van build for a hardier or more robust charging system then maybe your needs are just a **** of a lot slimmer than most, but I'd personally rather get caught with more power than needed rather than the other way around. Under these circumstances you're also insuring neither alternator needs to work harder than what would be manageable or safe for either one of them, with some built-in redundancy in placeas well, which is also always nice.

This also makes for a very ideal design perimeter starting point, where you have two hardy alter. power generators in place *from the factory OEM (think factory warranty here) ready to provide you ample auxiliary power right from day-1 working in tandem with each other when surge capacity is needed and sharing the loads in between the rest of the time.

If 99% of Camper Van builders are not interested in that then I must be part of the remaining 1% then. This would be a first for me of course, having never been in 1% ever in my life, but hey there's always a first time for everything, I guess.

PK
 

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...or appliances such as air conditioners or cooktops.
If you idle in the evening, your battery will last further into the night. Even without large consumers, if you aren't driving every day, the duals should make a quick top-off a breeze.
To my eyes, dual alternators seem like a very cost-effective option, depending on your camping habits.
Again, I’m not saying there are not set ups that might be able to utilize it, but they are exceptionally few and far between.

Dual alternators aren’t going to reduce the charge time of most set ups. I haven’t seen very many house battery chargers that can charge at even 100 A, which is within the capacity of a single alternator. Most chargers seem to be in the 50-60 amp range, and most batteries aren’t going to be able to ingest more than that anyway.

I’m sure there are people out there that have crazy set ups where they are stacking multiple battery chargers in parallel to multiple high-capacity lithium batteries to be able to charge at some sort of crazy amperage, but again those are going to be pretty rare. And let’s be honest, the people who have the knowledge and ability to set up something like that aren’t the ones posting asking if dual alternators are worth it.
 

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Again, I’m not saying there are not set ups that might be able to utilize it, but they are exceptionally few and far between.
No offense intended, but you seem to be overgeneralizing from your particular usage pattern, whatever that may be. What you are overlooking is the relative capability of a single vs dual alternator setup while idling. Yes, while cruising down the highway on a cool afternoon, one alternator is likely to provide all the power you need. Idling on a hot day is a very different situation.

Hot-weather campers who want to add some charge to their batteries as quickly and as quietly as possible without going for a drive are not the least bit "few and far between". Dual alternators shine in this very common situation--especially when there are also large active consumers, such as the A/C.
 
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