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Discussion Starter #1
So a new problem to solve, where the filler port body for diesel is shorter than the gasoline version. Last he mentioned it, @HDH used a vacuum hose adapter to bridge the gap. Checking the forum to see what other folks who have done this mod used as a solution.
 

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So a new problem to solve, where the filler port body for diesel is shorter than the gasoline version. Last he mentioned it, @HDH used a vacuum hose adapter to bridge the gap. Checking the forum to see what other folks who have done this mod used as a solution.
Yes, I ran into these same problems. I installed my diesel system after reading about it in the build thread of @ranchero. Asked questions and detailed pictures but never got any. He must have ran into these same problems but didn't describe any of it in his build thread.


I just went for it and worked out the problems as they arose. My vacuum hose adapter has been replaced for an ABS bushing that I found in the plumbing section of the Home Depot. Took me a while to find something that had the right diameter. If I remember correctly I had to shorten it a little. It's threaded so I could cap my fuel inlet if I wanted to.


The problem with the adapter bushing is that at some fuel stations on the west coast they use "environmentally" friendly fill nozzles with a cover that captures the gasoline fumes as you fill the tank. These nozzles are a major pain when filling a motor cycle tank and I've had issues in a few places where this device reduces the actual fill nozzle length so much that the nozzle barely touches the second flapper valve in the Transit filler neck. As a result the gas fill nozzle keeps kicking the fuel supply off.
Traveled several weeks in Canada, Idaho and Montana without any issues, but back in Oregon and Washington I've ran into some gas station that have "problem" nozzles.


See picture for details:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm thinking one of those flexible multi-diameter hose adapters might work. Can't recall where I saw the rubbery kind, so another bike ride to Home Despot and Slows to check out possible solutions.

Researching online I found Fernco #1056-250 /22 flexible coupling that looks perfect when trimmed for depth. One end is 2.88" ID which will fit around the gasoline no-cap fitting and can be secured to it with the hose clamp. The other end is 2.38" ID, which is just slightly wider than the 2.25" ID of the filler gasket. Cut to the right length, it will push against the gasket just like the no-fill cap does on the original gas filler body. Unfortunately for instant gratification, this is a coupling for the infrequently used 2-1/2" pipe size, so nobody stocks it locally. Available in a week from SupplyHouse.com.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I received the Fernco 1056-250/22 flexible coupling and can confirm it is the ideal solution for bridging from the diesel fill port to the gas no-cap filler fitting. It is a two-piece unit. The main body diameter fits over the gas no-cap fitting and can be band-clamped to the filler neck. The male end of the insert bushing rests firmly on the face of the no-cap fitting and fits perfectly against the flexible gasket of the diesel filler port. The bushing is about 3/4" - 1" too long, but can be easily removed and trimmed to the exact length needed. The main body is a bit long - the band can be slipped up so it is positioned around the filler neck just beyond the no-cap fitting and the excess main body material can trimmed away. Not sure if there's room in the filling area to photograph this in any useful manner.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Installed the Fernco coupling and all the exterior parts of the diesel filling port today. The Fernco fit easily over the no-cap gas fitting. I trimmed an inch off and cinched it to the filler tube. I trimmed the insert bushing conservatively and got it to the right length on the third cutting. Turned out the length needed worked out to only about the width of the cinch band on the insert, which made it really easy to get a clean, straight cut using the band as a guide.

The gas filler tube has some play, so best to have the insert length be just a bit long so that the gasket of the diesel fill housing presses tightly against the face of the Fernco bushing, which is in turn is pressed firmly against the face of the no-cap gas fill fitting. If the Fernco and filler tube aren't quite centered, alignment can be adjusted by pushing the inside of the bushing.

The 3" Rectorseal Tom Kap fitting @HDH used, available at Home Depot, is a good alternative solution. Advantage - the Tom Kap fits through the diesel fill gasket and around the no-cap gas fill fitting, holding the ports in alignment. The Fernco relies on friction fit to maintain final alignment. Disadvantage - the Tom Kap introduces a lip outside the diesel fill gasket, which can cause the pump to cut out at West Coast filling stations with pollution control fume seals on nozzle. The face of the Fernco is interior to the gasket, so a fill station nozzle can get a bit more depth into the no-cap fitting. This may be enough to prevent the pump cut-off problem. It will be a while before I can report on a field test.

Other differences: Tom Kap is rigid ABS plastic, cost ~$5, stocked at HD etc., cuts with a saw. Fernco 1056-250/22 is flexible PVC, cost ~$10, available online, cuts easily with a sharp knife.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Filled the tank and fired up the heater for first time yesterday. The nice offset funnel I expected to use was too big to fit into the DEF port. D'oh! Needed to be 5/8" OD. I got a foot of 5/8" OD / 1/2" ID polyethylene tubing and a Funnel King flexible spout (#32157 - https://www.wirthco.com/32157.html ) that's made to fit the mouth of most quart / gallon size plastic bottles, including a 2-1/2 gallon jug of K-1 heating kerosene. The tubing fit snugly onto the flexible spout, but I added a bit of duct tape to secure & seal. Punched a little hole in the handle of the kerosene bottle for air vent. The tank took all 2.5 gallons with the sending unit gauge reading just a hair below full.

I saved the 2.5 gallon jug for refueling. Going to test some heat shrink on a scrap of the polyethylene tubing, and if it doesn't melt, use heat shrink to seal / secure the tubing to the flexible spout. I'll enlarge the vent hole and pop in the body of a tubeless tire valve to make a capped vent. A smaller 1 gallon jug may be more practical for topping up when the gauge drops below 1/2 full.

I'm inclined to keep using K-1 kerosene because it has none of the additives needed to make diesel work in modern engines. It's pricey...but then, so is good wine. Same principle, in fact.
 
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