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Espar B4L Heater not starting at Elevation

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So I installed a Espar B4L in my 2020 transit, under the passenger seat and have a problem with the heater starting when I am at elevation.

I live in Boise ID, at around 3k feet elevation, when down here in the valley my heater starts 99% of the time without issues. When I travel to my local ski area around 6800K feet the heater NEVER starts first try and generally will take around 30+ minutes of trying to get the thing started. Once it does starts at elevation, it will run absolutely fine stopping and starting. When I got back down in elevation it also will always start fine, and then back up to elevation I again have the problem.

Ive completely taken apart the entire gas line from the pickup in the tank all the way to the heater, ensuring rise, fittings, etc are perfect... still have the same problem of getting it started at elevation.

Heatso has been sorta OK to work with, but I feel like they dont really know either. They will be sending me a new ECU (when they get them in a couple weeks).

Has anyone had this problem, is there a trick to getting it started I could use until i get the root cause sorted?

Appreciate any pointers!
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Not sure if it'd be related, but according to the guy at Esparparts.com you need this standpipe when using the B4L on the transit:

 

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Not really sure, but maybe replaces the stock standpipe? My heater is on order. The Espar guy said they had a transit come in with problems, and realized the issue was the standpipe being way out of spec.

The Espar needs a 2mm ID tube, stock is 6mm. That's a huge difference volume wise for fuel going into the Espar, I can imagine that'd cause issues running correctly and proper fuel ratios.
 

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I wonder if anyone who has ordered from esparparts.com has had issues with their heater? vs Heatso.

Seems a few people who have talked with Espar directly have had Espar tell them they'd stay away from Heatso and that they have problems with the heaters Heatso sells...

Seems to match people's experiences on here
 
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Reactions: Chainman1

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Yes, that'd likely result in a very rich condition (too much fuel, not enough oxygen) - which would be exasperated by running at altitude (even less oxygen).

Although it seems the opposite of people reporting having issues with not enough fuel moving through?
 

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I have both, tbd on the install. I got my kit faster than expected from esparparts in MI. I'll ping them for tips/instructions before I start.
 

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I think everyone who has problems needs to try this fuel standpipe. I’m 100% positive esparparts in Michigan knows what they’re doing, and if they identified that this is required on the transit (they sell transit kits) to fix problems, then it probably is required.


Not sure if it'd be related, but according to the guy at Esparparts.com you need this standpipe when using the B4L on the transit:

 
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Reactions: TrevMetz

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Again, you need a smaller diameter fuel standpipe. It is not rocket science that the heater will not work correctly using a tube diameter 3x the recommended diameter by Espar (6mm vs 2mm). Not that complicated.

launcher wrote some very detailed recommendations on the prior page, I’d say everyone who’s having problems should make sure they try all those before thinking this is a bad product.
Bad installation/incorrect configuration does not equal a bad product
 

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Found my answer, in case anyone else has the same question, it is to prevent debris from getting inside the standpipe and should be discarded before installation.
Let us know where you end up putting that standpipe into the tank!
 

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I don’t see a reason why you need 91. 87 in Denver is plenty good enough. I use 87 at sea level too. Will be fascinated to know if the 91 is causing the problem, I imagine most everybody uses 87 in their vans for the most part.
 

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I suspect there are hundreds of these heaters out there that are installed by professional van/rv outfitters that have no problems running at high altitudes. Companies learn how to set them up once and have a standard installation configuration that works, so you never hear from the owners in the forums about the troubles of installing or running them - because they don’t have any problems and they don’t go on these forums in general.

DIY creates a lot of room for improper installation, even for capable people. There is no substitute for experience.
 

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What did you do to the output? ( fuel output?)
 

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Makes you appreciate how well designed modern car engines are. Computer monitoring and adjustment sure helps.

I used to race small Rc cars with fuel/nitro two stroke carbureted engines, it was crazy just how much those had to be tuned. It was a constant battle to get the air fuel fixture just right, half a turn on the high or low speed needle and things were out of whack.
 
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Where’s your fuel pump mounted? What Angle? Is it near any heat sources?
 
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