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Discussion Starter #1
I'm no stranger to the ecoboost, and looking to get in to an EB AWD transit in the next year, but am a bit perplexed that the 3.5 EB is so massively detuned in the transit. It actually makes the same HP as the 2.7 EB in the pickup line. So, Ford's confusing choices aside, who tunes these?
This engine comfortably makes 70 more foot pounds in stock form in the f150. I want to tow more comfortably in the mountains at elevation, so any stock HP can be as much as 30% decreased due to elevation loss. So tuning the engine up a bit to match the F150 numbers might get me to sea level equivalent of stock.
Anyway, I'm shocked I can't find more posts on this forum of people asking for this. It's pretty much question number one in every other EB vehicle forum, and the answer is "lots of people tune these!". The only other post I even see here is a bunch of people who obviously have limited mechanical or car tuning knowledge saying "well, I'm sure ford did the best they could.." No...no they didn't. They literally pulled boost and HP out of an engine capable on nearly twice the power output (reliably with longevity).
So, who does it? There has to be someone. There's no way, this many years in to the EB engine, that no one is tuning a transit.
 

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Good question. We own a 2020 AWD with the Ecoboost engine. We have driven about 1000 miles since we picked it up at the dealer. I too am interested in tuning but I'm not sure it makes the current top 10 list of to-be-purchased items. At some point I will start calling around to the F150 tuners and see if they will work on our van or if they see any limitations.
 

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I thought I read on this forum that the Transit was detuned because it couldn't handle the heat produced from the 3.5 EcoBoost. I have a 2020 awd crewvan being built and would be interested as well as to who tunes them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's one way to look at it. I read it as Ford turned down the power because x and therefore used a smaller radiator because they could. Getting more cooling is easily done. In my focus RS if you run more boost you upgrade the intercooler and radiator. Easy work. And by the way, my stock 2.3 single turbo 4cyl makes 25 more hp than the eb transit. That's just lame power they gave us in the transit. It's capable of waaaay more, safely.
 

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In many cases, the larger the rig, the more detuned the engine offering. Mostly for longevity reasons. As far as cooling being a limitation, they could keep torque maxed out for more drivability. HP makes heat, not torque. And it's not so much a radiator limitation, it's the front end. That would have to change before they could get more square inches of cooling. You have a lot more room up front in an F-150 for engine, radiator, fans, and a large opening.

However, we may see a power boost now that the ancient Chevy Express will be offered with a 401HP 6.6 liter V8.
 

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In many cases, the larger the rig, the more detuned the engine offering. Mostly for longevity reasons. As far as cooling being a limitation, they could keep torque maxed out for more drivability. HP makes heat, not torque. And it's not so much a radiator limitation, it's the front end. That would have to change before they could get more square inches of cooling. You have a lot more room up front in an F-150 for engine, radiator, fans, and a large opening.

However, we may see a power boost now that the ancient Chevy Express will be offered with a 401HP 6.6 liter V8.
You can't make more torque without making more hp also.
H = T x rpm/5252, where H is horsepower, T is pound-feet
 

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You can't make more torque without making more hp also.
H = T x rpm/5252, where H is horsepower, T is pound-feet
Yes, but I'm talking about upping both at lower RPM, where we're currently below the peak HP (and cooling demand) numbers. F-150 is 470 pound-feet at 3500 RPM, which is 313.2 HP, just a smidge higher than the current Transit. If you kept a flat HP curve from there to redline by progressively reducing boost, torque would be decreasing as RPMs went up. This is called torque rise (read on the graph from right to left, torque is rising as RPM's drop), and makes for useful hill pulling performance if you're at max output. You start the hill at high RPMs and as you slow, load decreases but you remain at maximum HP to the wheels as RPMs drop, without needing to downshift. Or, it lets you accelerate, shifting through the gears, at maximum power output.

All that said, Ford doesn't want to run that much torque on a rig that's on average running much heavier than the F-150, because it would be used more often, and longevity would suffer.
 

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I am running a RaceChip setup that was made for the F150, they are data collecting and mapping the Transit ECU.
You can order one today and it will work great, mine has been fine for 8k miles and makes a huge difference in performance.
MPG not seeing a change but I can't keep my foot out of Eco-beast anyway :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am running a RaceChip setup that was made for the F150, they are data collecting and mapping the Transit ECU.
You can order one today and it will work great, mine has been fine for 8k miles and makes a huge difference in performance.
MPG not seeing a change but I can't keep my foot out of Eco-beast anyway :)
What does that thing do? Does it actually modify your tuning or is it just modifying sensor data to trick the ECU in to giving more power? If you remove it can ford tell you had it on there?
 

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It sits between the sensor and ECU so yes tricky data and no ecu proof of the fun you have been having :)
It has 7 settings from nothing, to eco to full nuts (I have only gone to 6 and that was really impressive).
I plan to do another dyno test as I did a baseline before it was installed.
 

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The issue even though it's an ecoboost there really wasn't any support. Not until recently did hptuners have support for the transit. Up to year 19'.
When I got my 17 I looked everywhere. 5 star tuning only did 15-16. They now will do it. Brew city boost also told me no back then but now yes. They all do it now but what sucks for mb e is I'm in California and they will no longer ship here. I have another tuner that can tune and tunes explorers in the 12's and Raptors to 500. He will not ship an ngauge to California but can send the files.
 

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Why did Ford derate the awd ecoboost? Is the awd system unable to handle the power? These questions should be answered before you increase power and damage the awd system.
 

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What's a giubo?
The early transits had a rubber donut between the transmission and driveshaft. It's what all European manufacturers use. In 2017 they started using regular driveshaft yolks behind the transmission.
Even though it's been detuned, the EcoBoost transits still move real good. Specially with 3.73 gears.
 
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