Ford Transit USA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here is my question before I pull the trigger on my 2020 transit. If I order the aux fuse panel & high spec interface it comes with duel AGM batteries. The duel alternator package includes everything in the aux fuse panel package and would only be a $460 upgrade, if you subtract the cost of the aux fuse panel/high spec package.
#1: I only need one battery for the van to operate. Can I separate them? I.E. one for house, one for the van to operate on. My current van operates like this with an isolator. I would be adding a second battery to the house side for a total of three.
#2: Can I isolate the second alternator, to just charge the house batteries?
I searched through the forum & the googlator but couldn’t find any answers. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
2020 AWD CrewVan on order..........
Joined
·
111 Posts
I'm right where you are too. I'm very interested to know how that dual alternator option works. I don't plan to have solar panels because I will park inside and then take the van out for 1-2-3 day excursions.

I searched too and didn't find anything really Transit related except it looked like this was an option, or was going to be an option for the 2018 model year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
There is a guy, “Vanpackr” who has just taken delivery of a dual alternator 2020 who has many of the same Q’s. Find his posts and ask him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
Thread.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
According to the 2020 BEMM the battery configuration is programmed into system and any changes must be reconfigured by a dealer. Removing one of the batteries from the vehicle system can mess up auto start/stop and Smart Regenerative Charging (SRC) and will make the vehicle out of compliance with "homologation, vehicle tax, and excise requirements". Not sure if that means is will "throw a code" that will prevent passing inspection or something. And I found nothing about the dual alternator other than it providing more available power to the system overall and nothing about isolating it in any way. That doesn't mean someone clever enough couldn't do it but it looks like it might have unintended consequences on other systems that would have to be dealt with and might need a dealer to address.

My plan is to use CCP2 which supplies 175A to drive my B2B charger which will limit the draw 60A max regardless of the state of charge of the house batteries. The charger will also step up and otherwise manage the voltage charging the house battery bank. Since CCP2 is managed, the vehicle will shed the load when needed to maintain vehicle system voltage and/or maintain sufficient crank current in the vehicle batteries. This approach will also isolate the charging from the effects of SRC and the start/stop functions without needing to disable them. (which can still be done in a couple of ways)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,027 Posts
Here is my question before I pull the trigger on my 2020 transit. If I order the aux fuse panel & high spec interface it comes with duel AGM batteries. The duel alternator package includes everything in the aux fuse panel package and would only be a $460 upgrade, if you subtract the cost of the aux fuse panel/high spec package.
#1: I only need one battery for the van to operate. Can I separate them? I.E. one for house, one for the van to operate on.
Shelby,

The dual batteries work in parallel. Below is a Thread where this has been discussed without the dual alternators. Post # 11 by Hein is spot on.

Good luck

Semper Fi

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Shelby,

The dual batteries work in parallel. Below is a Thread where this has been discussed without the dual alternators. Post # 11 by Hein is spot on.

Good luck

Semper Fi

After reading this thread from a while back and recent reading of the 2020 BEMM I would add that the Blue Sea ACR function described is performed by the Standard Battery Protector on the 2020 (and maybe other) models when connecting to the CCP points. In addition, the BEMM states that any load attached directly to the batteries must utilize a relay switched by the load shedding function of the vehicle to assure that vehicle system voltage is maintained. I would think you would only need to connect directly to the battery if you anticipate loads in excess of the CCP2 rated capacity of 175A or the connection on the optional FPBG (discussed above) 200A capacity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the input. I think I’m going to go with Vanpackr’s suggestion and just charge the house off the CCP. I gave up on the duel alt set up. The stock 250 alt should be good. I still don’t think that I need two battery’s for the van though. I’ll check once I get it about removing one & having the dealer program it for one. I can always use a spare battery. It would suck to have to replace both 5 years down the road in a strange town. The van itself doesn’t need two but it’s the only way to get the aux fuse panel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,027 Posts
Shelby,

I have the dual battery set up with a single alternator, loads of extra mobility equipment along with a 3rd battery. The single alternator handles everything fine.

If your batteries go bad (many posts about that and I've experienced it) some have replaced with premium batteries from WalMart, Nationwide auto parts stores etc, that have better warranties than Ford and don't require an almost all day test by Ford before they take action. And are located all over the country.

Semper Fi
 

·
Registered
2020 AWD CrewVan on order..........
Joined
·
111 Posts
The BEMM is interesting reading. yawn :sleep:

Normal Operating Voltage
The Transit electrical system is charged by one, sometimes two, alternators. The vehicle electronics run on a 12V supply with a negative ground return. The factory fit equipment are designed for normal operations to be fully operational in the range 9-14V
So it sounds like the dual alternator setup isn't separate but both feed the vehicle wiring. The Load Shedding feature at engine run is based on voltage so if the load is too high for one alternator it will shed loads until the voltage comes back up to normal. This could be affected by engine RPM and temperature of the Alternator. So a dual alternator setup would provide for more current and with 2 taking the load the temperatures would stay lower and thus less issues with temperature (the alternators nemesis). Although there is still the matter of the wire temperature that is being monitored so that second alternator may not do that much.

Also, the FPBG has information that I believe to be very similar to the CCP2 connection. FPBG is rated to 200A but only for 6 - 12 minutes. continuous usage has a limit of up to 120A.

I think one 250A alternator should be enough. Dual alternators are only recommend for a Large Ambulance with very high loads with the engine running but for short durations. I imagine charging a heart shocker or other medical devices.

I am pretty impressed with the technology explanations in the BEMM even thought some items seems missing and the typos.

I would really like a FPBG (Ford Programmable Battery Guard) but it is listed as "late availability" so I'm guessing I won't order one. The BEMM states that it can be retrofitted if I could find out how to purchase the FPBG as a part or accessory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
According to the 2020 BEMM the battery configuration is programmed into system and any changes must be reconfigured by a dealer. Removing one of the batteries from the vehicle system can mess up auto start/stop and Smart Regenerative Charging (SRC) and will make the vehicle out of compliance with "homologation, vehicle tax, and excise requirements". Not sure if that means is will "throw a code" that will prevent passing inspection or something. And I found nothing about the dual alternator other than it providing more available power to the system overall and nothing about isolating it in any way. That doesn't mean someone clever enough couldn't do it but it looks like it might have unintended consequences on other systems that would have to be dealt with and might need a dealer to address.

My plan is to use CCP2 which supplies 175A to drive my B2B charger which will limit the draw 60A max regardless of the state of charge of the house batteries. The charger will also step up and otherwise manage the voltage charging the house battery bank. Since CCP2 is managed, the vehicle will shed the load when needed to maintain vehicle system voltage and/or maintain sufficient crank current in the vehicle batteries. This approach will also isolate the charging from the effects of SRC and the start/stop functions without needing to disable them. (which can still be done in a couple of ways)
Which B2B charger are you planning to use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Which B2B charger are you planning to use?
I have a Renogy DCC50S on the shelf to be installed in the coming weeks. There are good solutions from Sterling, CTEK, and Victron that I also considered and some of those are more robust. My electrical plan does not currently include an inverter for running AC appliances but it allows for one. Limitations on the Renogy unit are 50A max charge rate and 24V limit on solar panel input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Ford told me that the dual alternators work together. It is not like on a Sprinter, where you can set up a separate alternator that is used only for house charging. The Transit dual alternators both supply the vehicle start/charge system. The dual alternators in the Transit is really like having just one bigger alternator (except more parts to fail).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
Yes but can it run if one of the alternators dies?
That would be nice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
So far there is only 1 reported alternator failure on this forum, And it was on an almost new Transit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Having redundancy could be nice. But I would think needing more than 250A of alternator would be an edge case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Yes but can it run if one of the alternators dies?
That would be nice.
You’d hope Ford planned for one alternator to fail electrically, and keep vehicle running from other. A mechanical failure is a bit worse.

Anyway, I expect someone will try disconnecting one alternator before too long. If the other alternator can be modified or reprogrammed to work as a single-alternator, then the second alternator with bracket, pulleys, belt, and tensioner can be repurposed as a “second” stand alone unit. If (or when) that is made to work, it can remain 12V or be replaced with 24V or 48V alternator.

I’m disappointed Ford didn’t offer the second alternator as a stand-alone item so it could work like the Sprinter’s. Or better yet offer a kit to segregate them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Here is my question before I pull the trigger on my 2020 transit. If I order the aux fuse panel & high spec interface it comes with duel AGM batteries. The duel alternator package includes everything in the aux fuse panel package and would only be a $460 upgrade, if you subtract the cost of the aux fuse panel/high spec package.
#1: I only need one battery for the van to operate. Can I separate them? I.E. one for house, one for the van to operate on. My current van operates like this with an isolator. I would be adding a second battery to the house side for a total of three.
#2: Can I isolate the second alternator, to just charge the house batteries?
I searched through the forum & the googlator but couldn’t find any answers. Thanks.
For $500 it is an easy yes to get dual 250 amp alternators. You will never regret it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,745 Posts
Here is my question before I pull the trigger on my 2020 transit. If I order the aux fuse panel & high spec interface it comes with duel AGM batteries. The duel alternator package includes everything in the aux fuse panel package and would only be a $460 upgrade, if you subtract the cost of the aux fuse panel/high spec package.
#1: I only need one battery for the van to operate. Can I separate them? I.E. one for house, one for the van to operate on. My current van operates like this with an isolator. I would be adding a second battery to the house side for a total of three.
#2: Can I isolate the second alternator, to just charge the house batteries?
I searched through the forum & the googlator but couldn’t find any answers. Thanks.
I can't address the second alternator question. I can answer your #1 question.

The vans dual batteries are not deep cycle batteries. They are SLI (starter, lights and ignition) batteries. You can easily separate them and use one as a house battery but, you will greatly reduce it's life.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top