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Discussion Starter · #101 ·
Laying the Vinyl Floor, Part 1

We made a ramp to smoothly merge our floor with the Transit's sloped floor (over the tranny) between the front seats.





Then we made sure all the floor mounting screw heads were below the floor surface and leveled the depressions.





Sanded it all smooth.


The vinyl we liked came in a 12' wide roll., We wanted to avoid any seams, so we got a ~17' length, and end up with about twice as much as we need for Annie. Not yet sure what we'll use the leftover length for, but it might work out nicely for a hoped for bathroom remodel.


Anyways, we cut it in half. Snap line is used to mark the cut line.


Cut the roll with a sawsall. Loaded our preferred half into Annie


It's really cushy, flexible stuff!


And began slicing and dicing.



All cut and ready for glue down. We'll work on that and finishing touches in part 2 of this riveting saga.
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 · (Edited)
Plan is 1/4" cedar strips, but I may switch to 1/4" birch ply. There will be aluminum transition (stair) right angle molding at the edges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #104 ·
Laying the Vinyl Floor, Part 2

It's time to glue down the floor.
We did this one half at a time to minimize any shifting.
We rolled back the vinyl and applied the glue. Let it set for about an hour.


Then unfolded the vinyl and squashed it onto the glued floor. We used a rolling pin to push out any bubbles.


We let it rest overnight,and trimmed the vinyl to it's final size. We made up some cedar trim boards, cut them to size, painted them with Varithane spar varnish (2 coats) and glued them to Annie's chassis and the floor. We used 3M 90 spray adhesive for the chassis and TiteBond III for the floor. We added the cedar at the slider and at the rear entrance.


Then we added the edge trim. Most of it is step edging.


Cutting the trim was a bit tricky.


The boss dropped by and gave her approval (whew!).


Added the rear trim.


Added a little cedar shelf, and the floor is done!
 

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Yes, looks great! Stan, I am really enjoying your documenting of this project. Inspiring, and giving me great ideas for my turn in about 4 to 5 months. And if I haven't said so already, thanks so much for responding to the questions!
 

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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
Thanks for the nice comments folks!

The build has been on hold for a bit while I get the slider window replacement and it's associated multiple delays handled.:mad:
Dealer now finally has a non-broken replacement. Annie goes in for the windowectomy tomorrow. Hopefully, we can resume the build on Tuesday.

Stan
 

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Discussion Starter · #110 ·
Ceiling insulation, part 1

Things have been kind of on hold while we went through some window hassles. You can read about that in my blog.

But now we're able to make some progress on the build.

I figured I'd start catching up with the ceiling insulation to date. (Hint, it is still a work in progress.)



The ceiling insulation will be 1.5" of foil backed rigid foam, with a layer of reflectix between the foam boards and the bead-board that will be the finished ceiling. The foam is mounted with VHB.
Because of the window hassles, I've only done the first layer so far.





The layer is sealed with expanding foam.


The first layer is 1" thick board, the second will be half inch thick. I will also foam the edges of the second board.


There will be a layer of Reflectix after that, and then the actual birch bead-board ceiling. Power for ceiling can lights will run between the Reflectix and the 1/2" foam board, with adequate service loop wherever we end up mounting the lights. Determining that is something that will be done experimentally.
 

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How much need was there for the VHB tape? Couldn't you just have used some spray glue, knowing that the bead-board ceiling would lock it in?
And is it PolyIso that you're using as insulation? Nice work!

Van Williams
 

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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
Yes, it's polyiso.

The main reason for the VHB is that I HATE the smell of the spray adhesive (I tend to use 3M 90 spray), and the stink takes forever to dissipate.

Besides, the VHB is just so much easier to apply. Don't have to deal with getting over-spray crap in my eyes, on the floor, on the windows, what's left of my hair, etc. while spraying the ceiling.

Just to be contradictory, I am using the spray for some smaller fill-in sections of the insulation.:blush:

Stan
 

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Yes, it's polyiso.

Just to be contradictory, I am using the spray for some smaller fill-in sections of the insulation.:blush:

Stan
We're not living in a black and white world, so I get it.

About the Reflectics you'll be using, what's the reason for using it. It has little R-value and more importantly, I question it's durability. I wonder how much it will degrade over time.

Van Williams
 

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Such a great thread and blog. Thanks for taking the time! Great info for folks like me who have never undertaken a project like this. I'm excited to jump in on mine when it arrives.. -someday. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #115 ·
Reflectix R value could be as high as 3.
I'm using it because:

  • I've got lots of it and it couldn't hurt.
  • It will be used to sandwich any wiring, like for lights. The sandwich should help reduce chance of the wires moving around and making noise.
  • The Reflectix may also reduce noise leakage through the roof. I'm a believer in multiple material impedance mismatches serving to reduce noise transmission.
  • I don't' see any particular reason for it to degrade if it doesn't move...as long as it's not being squashed. Even if the bubbles do leak, there's not a lot of air movement, so they should (I hope) still act as more or less closed cells.
Stan
 

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Discussion Starter · #116 ·
Such a great thread and blog. Thanks for taking the time! Great info for folks like me who have never undertaken a project like this. I'm excited to jump in on mine when it arrives.. -someday. lol
Thanks!
This is my first RV conversion as well. Doing a lot of empirical engineering and learning as I go. Hopefully, it will work out so great that it will also be my last!;)

Stan
 

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We're not living in a black and white world, so I get it.

About the Reflectics you'll be using, what's the reason for using it. It has little R-value and more importantly, I question it's durability. I wonder how much it will degrade over time.

Van Williams
Reflectix requires air space on one or both sides to be an effective insulation. Their web site info:

http://www.reflectixinc.com/basepage.asp?PageName=Performance+Information&PageIndex=730

When protected by a wall covering I would not be concerned about its durability.

In the 4" deep cavities in the Transit walls I will use 2" of closed cell foam covered by the Reflectix, a 2" air space and then the wall covering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #118 ·
The link you provide says:
Why are Air Spaces Required (in every application)?
For either a reflective insulation or a radiant barrier, an air space of a minimum thickness is required on the reflective side of the product. (Most Reflectix® products are reflective (shiny) on both sides.) The reflective insulation benefit is derived from the interaction of the highly reflective surface with the air space. If the reflective surface is in contact with another building material, it becomes a conductor (transmitting the energy by conduction). An air space may be specified on one or both sides of the product (always on a reflective side). Enclosed air spaces, when instructed, are required to provide the stated R-value.

I don't understand why closed cell foam insulation (which is used because of its low thermal conductivity) isn't considered a dead air space?

Stan
 

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“I don't understand …” – you have a lot of company.
This is the way I look at heat transfer:
Conduction is through solid objects and is the only factor an R-value measures.
Convection transfers heat between fluids, (moving air and water)
Radiation is energy transmitted directly through space and requires a line of sight connection between the objects.
In your ceiling insulation application radiation and convection are so small they can be ignored. Conduction is what is moving the heat out. The conduction R value of the reflectix would be about 1.
I think the bigger issue is how the heat flows easily through the uninsulated roof supports, (called a thermal bridge). And we haven't talked about window insulation and air infiltration.

I’ve enjoyed reading “Building Annie”, have learned a lot, & hope to start my own build soon.

Dana
 
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