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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

The other day my battery ran down and I didn't leave the lights on. I have a B2B installed to the CCP and my electrical system is grounded to the rear grounding point. I was unloading a lot of stuff during the day, but I do try to remember to turn the lights off, but I'm sure I forgot more than once. Could the LED lights drain the battery? I always thought the vehicle would secure the accessories before draining down the starting battery, is that not the case? I did have a rear brake light that stayed on a few weeks ago, but I didn't notice that this day. Any hints or tips on how to make sure this doesn't happen again? Voltages to check? I disconnected the house battery electrical system, partially for other reasons, and it hasn't happened since, but I'm worried now this will happen when I'm out in the woods by myself with no means of starting. Fortunately this time I was right by a car and driver that could give me a jump, but next time I might not be so lucky. Thanks for your help!
 

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Is the battery to battery charger on CCP1 or CCP2?

CCP1 is a direct connection to the battery all of the time - so certainly it can drain it.

CCP2 has a time delay shut off, but the time is fairly long. (programmable time)

There are some other posts on the forum related to power drain - I think that they had to do with the lights turning on when it was cold ?



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Perhaps you remember the episode of breaking bad where the RV starter battery is dead in the middle of no where?

That is a good reason to either get a portable starter battery or a small solar panel that can (over time) bring it back.

I put this panel on a few family member vehicles to keep them trickle charged since we don't drive as much as before.


It really doesn't even need a charge controller.
 

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2019 HR Cargo Oxford White 148 wb 3.7L
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I would add a switch, so you can join the house and chassis batteries in a emergency, should be able to drive
quite a distance, depending on the size of your house battery.
 

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2019 250 148 mr
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I went on vacation for a week and came back to a dead battery. Battery is new AGM (less than 3 months old) I started checking my battery voltage first thing in the morning and it's anywhere from 11.7-11.4. That seems to be enough to start the van, but if it keeps draining at that rate, I can see why it's dead in a week.

I plan on doing some tests to see if I can determine the drain.

I also have a B2B charger, but I have a manual battery cut off that completely isolates the batteries.
 

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I always thought the vehicle would secure the accessories before draining down the starting battery, is that not the case?
Is the battery to battery charger on CCP1 or CCP2?

CCP1 is a direct connection to the battery all of the time - so certainly it can drain it.

CCP2 has a time delay shut off, but the time is fairly long. (programmable time)
The first question that might need to be answered for clarification would be what model year the vehicle is.
2019 and earlier have a different CCP set up. I am not sure, but I believe it does not have the voltage/time out battery protection, so if that is the case and applies to the van is of that generation, then a malfunction or B2B wiring issue with the B2B could be an issue. If the vehicle is a 2020+ and CCP2 is being used then the vehicle should provide voltage for connections on that point. In that case some other parasitic not controlled by the vehicle voltage protection might be more likely.

A small lithium battery jump starter is cheap insurance/convenience regardless of any current issues. Amazon link
 

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I went on vacation for a week and came back to a dead battery. Battery is new AGM (less than 3 months old) I started checking my battery voltage first thing in the morning and it's anywhere from 11.7-11.4. That seems to be enough to start the van, but if it keeps draining at that rate, I can see why it's dead in a week.

I plan on doing some tests to see if I can determine the drain.

I also have a B2B charger, but I have a manual battery cut off that completely isolates the batteries.
My van started up with no problem after sitting for 5 weeks in my driveway, with the cargo lights having run many times as as I went in an out of it multiple time working on it (well actually more like measuring and pondering). I have all of the communication settings to the mothership in Dearborn shut off. I do wonder if the power draw from the wifi an cell connections stay powered with the vehicle off are a main contributor to the dead batteries that are reported on this forum.
(I do not have any of my own loads connected to the vehicle yet).
 

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I would add a switch, so you can join the house and chassis batteries in a emergency, should be able to drive
quite a distance, depending on the size of your house battery.
Interesting.
I always thought of having jumper cables as a more flexible back up than that approach for no start since they could be used for jumping from house batteries or another vehicle and also useful to help out others. But that would only be good in the case of a bad battery not a charging system problem. (Last summer, I followed and jump started my kids car multiple times to get the vehicle home from about 5 miles away due to a failing alternator ). Your suggestion would cover vehicle charging issues as well assuming your house battery had a good SOC.

That makes me wonder, if you had a second stand alone alternator dedicated charging a house battery, adding the ability to connect the house battery to the vehicle could provide redundancy that could be used to run the vehicle indefinitely(?) :unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In an emergency, if my house battery is charged, couldn't you just connect it to the car battery with jumpers and the difference in voltage would equalize after some time? Or use jumper cables to connect to a solar panel?

I have a 2019 and I only saw one post in the middle to connect to on the CCP, it did spark when I connected the wire (with nothing connected to the battery on the other end). I also had the cig lighter charger disconnected, so that wasn't it.

I've got a circuit breaker between the B2B and battery, so maybe I'll secure that and measure the car battery voltage for a few days. If I measure with the voltmeter the positive in cable from the CCP and then to the negative bus bar (connected to chassis ground) that should give the vehicle battery (or alternator charge if running), correct? Then between the B2B and the battery is either the house battery voltage when not charging or equal to the battery/alternator voltage when charging, is that correct? So as long as they aren't equal when the vehicle is off the B2B is behaving as expected?

I'm definitely going to look into a jump starter, great idea, thank you!

Thanks.
 

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Was the B2B hooked up for a while without this problem or is this a new problem that has occurred just since a B2B has been hooked up? What B2B do you have?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The B2B had been hooked up for a few weeks with no issues. It's a Victron 30 Amp B2B, the "Orion-Tr Smart DC-DC charger non-isolated."
 

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The B2B had been hooked up for a few weeks with no issues. It's a Victron 30 Amp B2B, the "Orion-Tr Smart DC-DC charger non-isolated."
I am not very familiar with that device, but I believe it is programmable for the vehicle voltage at which it will stop charging the house battery. If it is set to low then it could draw the vehicle battery down too low for it to restart (if the always hot CCP assumption for a 2019 is correct).

It could could it be possible in time you have had the B2B connected that you might not have encounter this problem yet if the house battery was in a fairly high state of charge when the van was shut off. The house battery may have reached the terminal charging voltage before it drew down the vehicle battery too much but this last time the battery was in a low enough state of charge that it continued charging for a long enough period of time that it drew the vehicle battery down too much (assuming the B2B was set that low). Just one possible scenario.
 
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