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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Any advice about traveling the AlcCan to AK?



Planning this year's road trip. Not interested in AK in the past but having the Transit has changed my mind.
 

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We did it in a motorhome about 10 years ago. Loved every bit of it and we want to go back in the van.

We also took side trips in our Jeep up the Dempster in the Yukon and the Dalton in AK. But we love remote areas and hundreds of miles on gravel roads was fine with us. We will have to take it a bit slower when we drive the gravel roads in the van, vs the Jeep.

I think the people who complain about the road conditions of the AK Hwy are those who pretty much stick to major interstates in big RVs and have low tolerance for roads that are less than perfect. The Alaska Hwy is all paved, short of road construction... and there is always road construction. That being said, there is a fairly high likelihood of getting a windshield chipped or cracked on the highway or driving in AK. Both our Jeep and motorhome windshield took a beating on the trip and had to be replaced.

I can't imagine driving to AK and not having at least a month from the time you enter Canada to the time you get back to the US.

Highlights for us included the remote roads up north, Denali NP, and coastal areas like Seward and Valdez.
 

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Even in the age of the internet, I would probably buy a copy of the Milepost as a reference for the drive. http://www.themilepost.com/

Most RV parks on the drive and in Alaska are not all that great and there are simply many areas without campgrounds. So either just get used to RV parks as a parking lots, or plan on boondocking on the side of the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I very much appreciate your insight. Milepost 2018 arrived yesterday. It is a comfort to have but in a race with reading the encyclopedia Britannica not sure which would win.

If boondocking allowed when it's to our liking the preferred way to go. Is it so traveled that gravel is always in the air?

I see there are multiple choices of route so honing that down to two will be useful. One up one back.

Something I read suggested not relying on the internet cuz it ain't always there. Or has digital cancer crept that far by now?

Thanks again.
 

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That is my next big road trip too. I'm planning at least 3 months as from southern Ontario it could take at least 6 weeks just there and back. The year round highway is now open to Tuktoyyaktuk in the NWT so you can now drive to the Arctic Ocean and actually get access to the ocean. I'll leave home mid to late July and get home in October or Novenber.
Milepost is kind of daunting so I've decided to read about routes a day or two before I actually do them.
 

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I am 97% tempted to make the Alaska trip this summer (June, July and August inclusive of starting from NJ and ending in TX).

Boondocking in the US for sure.

But I am finding conflicting reports about boondocking in Canada, especially on Crown Lands (heavy fines?) as well as whether pulling off on the roadside for the night is allowed on the Alcan, Cassair, or other roads.

Does anyone have solid information on boondocking laws (national or provincial)?
 

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I am 97% tempted to make the Alaska trip this summer (June, July and August inclusive of starting from NJ and ending in TX).

Boondocking in the US for sure.

But I am finding conflicting reports about boondocking in Canada, especially on Crown Lands (heavy fines?) as well as whether pulling off on the roadside for the night is allowed on the Alcan, Cassair, or other roads.

Does anyone have solid information on boondocking laws (national or provincial)?
I don't have solid information, but can share that when we drove the highway and you got significantly north, there was a distinct lack of roads or places to pull off and boondock away from towns. As in there were very few side roads of any type. I recall there being pullouts at river crossings, construction areas etc.

I'm thinking it will be easier in a van than it was in a big motorhome pulling a Jeep.
 

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I very much appreciate your insight. Milepost 2018 arrived yesterday. It is a comfort to have but in a race with reading the encyclopedia Britannica not sure which would win.

If boondocking allowed when it's to our liking the preferred way to go. Is it so traveled that gravel is always in the air?

I see there are multiple choices of route so honing that down to two will be useful. One up one back.

Something I read suggested not relying on the internet cuz it ain't always there. Or has digital cancer crept that far by now?

Thanks again.
Not sure how the internet is these days. We had it at RV parks and a few other places, but we did not have smart phones when we went and it just was not as important to be connected all the time.

The road is 100% paved, except for road construction sections. In which people are supposed to go slow. Dust was rarely a problem.
 

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You can add me too the list! We are planning the trip in 6/19. plan on taking 2 months too make the trip. Talking to some BC neighbors at our winter home in AZ, they lived by mile marker 275, told us to make sure we stay in campgrounds otherwise we will be ticketed for just pulling off the road. yes further north and fewer roads. we will be carrying a generator as we are not equipped with solar. Good input so far, will be following this thread. We will purchase a mile marker book also!
 

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Hyder Alaska is a neat stop for anyone taking the Cassiar Hwy option on the way up or down. It is one of the best places to see bears, if you are there at the right time of the year.
 

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Gravel section on the highway up to Dawson City.

It is sections like this that cost us windshields in the Jeep and motorhome. Trucks coming the other way at speed blow up a lot of rocks and there is no place to move over.

But it was on roads like the Dempster and Dalton that we lost windshields, not on the Alaska Hwy.
 

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Denali. You need to take a bus into the park to see the interior of the park and the mountain. It is pretty much an all day bus ride and often the weather prevents you from seeing the mountain. We hit a really good day.
 

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I am 97% tempted to make the Alaska trip this summer (June, July and August inclusive of starting from NJ and ending in TX).

Boondocking in the US for sure.

But I am finding conflicting reports about boondocking in Canada, especially on Crown Lands (heavy fines?) as well as whether pulling off on the roadside for the night is allowed on the Alcan, Cassair, or other roads.

Does anyone have solid information on boondocking laws (national or provincial)?
Non residents need a permit to camp on crown land. I usually drive down dead end roads and if there are no residences at the end I stay there for the night. Even if it is not legal (don't know for sure) it would be highly unlikely to be patrolled.
 

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Non residents need a permit to camp on crown land.
And where does one get that?
I'm heading to Canada and likely Alaska in a few weeks.
 
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