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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, we just bought a black 2017 Transit 350 HD and we're going over the van in detail to prepare for conversion. The roof has a dent near the passenger side rear and some light scuffs in a few spots, and between that and reading about all the roof plug leak issues we are thinking about coating the roof. We've used Dicor Metal RV Roof Coating on a camper before and it provided a pretty bulletproof coating, plus a noticeable reduction in heat transmission. With a black roof, it seems like the reduction in heat would be even greater.

Has anyone used this product on their Transit? Are there any other recommended coatings that people have used?
 

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A few people here have done similar to what you ask before.

 

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A few people here have done similar to what you ask before.

Thanks - I searched Dicor but only got threads about lap sealant. This is helpful.
 

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Why spend so much on a vehicle only to make it look like a 1970s mobile home?

People tend to go extremely overboard on the insulation/heat reduction topic
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Shade from solar panels would also work.
We're going for more of a "van-camping" build, rather than a full "vanlife"buildout. Sticking with factory USB for charging phones and not much else until we get a better feel for what we need.
 

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Bus Kote is another option. Probably would help reduce heat gain on a dark colored van with no solar panels.

All the best,
Hein
DIYvan
 

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Discussion Starter #9
See what the warranty period is, then research Tropi-cool.
My research of Tropi-Cool stopped at “100% silicone”. I’ve worked with silicone enough to never want to put it on my van. Had a camper where someone used silicone and it was a huge mess.
 

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I'm not sure why you would want to use an elastomeric paint on the whole roof just because of the plug leaks. I'd just address plug sealing issue with one of the methods documented on this site and paint the roof with an oil based acrylic enamel paint (i.e. Rustoleum) If you plan to paint it yourself, it is possible to get a decent finish rolling on this type of paint if you thin the paint out a bit. I suppose you could ad an acrylic hardener the the paint, but that's probably not necessary for a roof. Adherence to the clear coat would be my biggest concern. Ideally you would want to just scuff up the clearcoat rather than remove it so the protection of the factory paint is not negated. Perhaps a compatible high adherence primer and then a top coat would be a good idea to improve the bonding to the clear coat. Primer would probably be a good idea anyway when painting white over black.

If you got comfortable with your painting skill, you could do this.
147991

147992
 

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I'm not sure why you would want to use an elastomeric paint on the whole roof just because of the plug leaks. I'd just address plug sealing issue with one of the methods documented on this site and paint the roof with an oil based acrylic enamel paint (i.e. Rustoleum) If you plan to paint it yourself, it is possible to get a decent finish rolling on this type of paint if you thin the paint out a bit. I suppose you could ad an acrylic hardener the the paint, but that's probably not necessary for a roof. Adherence to the clear coat would be my biggest concern. Ideally you would want to just scuff up the clearcoat rather than remove it so the protection of the factory paint is not negated. Perhaps a compatible high adherence primer and then a top coat would be a good idea to improve the bonding to the clear coat. Primer would probably be a good idea anyway when painting white over black.
My goal with coating the whole roof is both leak prevention and heat reduction. The Dicor coating has a companion primer that we would use beforehand, after washing and a light scuff of the top with a green Scotchbrite pad.

My plan is to make it not visible from the ground - just covering the top inside the rain gutters and to the front and rear transitions.
 
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