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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hate the carpet in my wagon and was considering putting down something like vinyl plank flooring. Something like this


https://www.homedepot.com/p/Traffic...Plank-Flooring-24-sq-ft-case-185312/206934038



I know the carpet can be removed and usually leaves a sticky surface. Would I need more than that to install vinyl plank over the factory floor?



For those that have done this, how much did you use? I have a 350HD extended body for reference.


Tips, tricks and hints are welcome.
 

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I recently did my office floor with the same brand from HD, quick and easy to install and looks fantastic for not much $$. I would try installing it on top of the carpet, there are only a few edges where the trim might need to be adjusted. Get a few pieces to get a feel for how it would work out.

You would need about 3 cases.
 

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I used 3 cases of the Cork click-lock flooring from Home Depot (22.99 ft.sq./case) on a 148" WB Regular length van. Had roughly half a box left over. You can do a rough measurement and come up with your square feet, then allow whatever overage the flooring manufacturer recommends, 10% or so. Another method is to draw up a layout using plank dimensions that will give you a very exact representation of just how the jigsaw puzzle will go together.

This was a cargo van, so no carpet. Trying to keep the floor height low the OEM cargo mat was removed and I installed plywood over a layer of CS150 Thinsulate with sound-deadening flooring underlayment glued to the bottom of the ply.



 

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I can attest to vinyl needing to completely float. I installed vinyl plank with some basic trim around the entryways, and every plank that had a screw threw it started separating once it got cold. I had to pull the trim and notch out the screw locations. I've since installed cabinetry over the floor, and it will probably come back to bite me in the ass. I'd suggest waiting to install vinyl flooring until after your cabinetry is in.
 

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Vinyl expands too much when hot sun shines on the floor. So bad, my vinyl plank slid clean out the door. Anything without vinyl in it would be safer. In your house it is different, it doesn’t see such hot, direct, sun and usually has a greater distance across the room to absorb the expansion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info. We have used this in houses before, but never in an application like this.


The van will be set up like a crew cargo and has rear heat and air, so the factory floor needs to stay in place. Behind the second row of seats will be a workshop with base cabinet tool boxes mounted along each wall for storage and work benches.


I will wait until we get closer to the shop install before moving forward with the floor since I am still not sure what the exact layout will be. I might back up and punt and install something else all together.
 

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I used one piece vinyl in my wagon, floating directly on top of the carpet. I cut the vinyl to roughly the floor size, then put it in the empty van and trimmed it to fit with scissors and a box knife. With everything out of the van, I can easily roll it up and take it out and then reinstall it if I need to.

Pro’s are that it was pretty easy to install, it is water proof, easy to clean, has no seams to separate.
Con’s are that it is slick and things not tied down slide around very easily (that could be a pro also). It is somewhat brittle and can be cracked by high impact (like when removing or installing the seats) or if folded.

My bottom line is when I feel the need to replace it, I will go with a similar but more rubbery type of material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I used one piece vinyl in my wagon, floating directly on top of the carpet. I cut the vinyl to roughly the floor size, then put it in the empty van and trimmed it to fit with scissors and a box knife. With everything out of the van, I can easily roll it up and take it out and then reinstall it if I need to.

Pro’s are that it was pretty easy to install, it is water proof, easy to clean, has no seams to separate.
Con’s are that it is slick and things not tied down slide around very easily (that could be a pro also). It is somewhat brittle and can be cracked by high impact (like when removing or installing the seats) or if folded.

My bottom line is when I feel the need to replace it, I will go with a similar but more rubbery type of material.

Thanks for the comment. I had originally thought about using something like that but need something more substantial under foot that can withstand metal parts possibly dropping onto it along with a lot of metal or brass shavings. I've always ran plywood floors in my work vans but never had one this nice and thought I would class it up a little bit.

It's rare that I have anything just laying in the floor that can slide around so that is not much of an issue. Impact resistance and easy to clean are the main things I am looking at.
 

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Thanks for the info. We have used this in houses before, but never in an application like this.


The van will be set up like a crew cargo and has rear heat and air, so the factory floor needs to stay in place. Behind the second row of seats will be a workshop with base cabinet tool boxes mounted along each wall for storage and work benches.


I will wait until we get closer to the shop install before moving forward with the floor since I am still not sure what the exact layout will be. I might back up and punt and install something else all together of vinyl plank flooring atlanta.
Do you use vinyl plank wood flooring? Looks just like Pergo, and goes in the same plank-by-plank method. But it's waterproof, VERY durable, and flexes with the floor.
 

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Tips, tricks and hints are welcome.
Used vinyl in my van built 5 years ago with no problems with buckling or separation. Since it expands and contracts with the temperature it should not be trapped under cabinets, etc. My best advice is to wait until all items are in place and then install the vinyl with a 1/4 gap on all sides. This will require you to cover the gap with shoe mould or some type of trim.
 

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If using plank flooring, you need to take the time to read the spec sheets. Make sure you are buying something that is built to withstand extreme temperatures/ for sunrooms/porches/etc. A lot of it is designed only to be used in a house with central air/heating.
 
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