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If you only want to get clean then very little space, power or water is required.
That's my point. I use maybe half a gallon, and that's only when I want to wash my hair. Otherwise a pint via sponge. I do it outside with nothing more than a used water container, and it takes all of ten minutes once a week. It's not worth any space at all to me. But to each his own.

Cheers.
 

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2019 HR Cargo Oxford White 148 wb 3.7L
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The first 'modern' shower

Fast forward to 1767, when the first shower as we would recognise it today was patented by London stove maker William Feetham.

This invention pumped water into a basin above the user's head, before they pulled a chain that would release cold water. However, a noticeable downside of this breakthrough was that the same dirty liquid would have to be reused every time the chain was yanked during the same shower session.

By 1810, the English Regency Shower had been invented by an anonymous entrepreneur, which offered bathers a hot shower for the first time. This was then adapted further in 1850 after the Greek and Roman method of reliable plumbing was rediscovered, meaning that people no longer had to reuse the same old water.

In the 1920s, the US began pushing the shower out to the wider public, as opposed to just the wealthy. It wasn't until the 1960s that the UK followed suit, by which time the electric shower had been launched onto the market.

The 1980s was when the popularity of the shower hit full blast, with different shower heads, coloured lights and body jets all catching on. This trend has continued to the modern day, with a huge range now available to the population.

So, from incredibly humble beginnings, there you have it: the history of the shower in a nutshell. Who knows where it will go next?
 

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2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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I lived in a small-ish boat for a couple years. Had a shower; but frequently used the ones on the docks because they were spacious and comfortable. Went with outdoor shower on last rig. Worked fine; didn't use it much; definitely didn't use it in winter. So this one has an outdoor and indoor. How much water for a shower? Depends how much water is available. Somewhere with a nice hose-bib close? Live it up! No hose around? Meter the water cautiously. Hoping the recirculating setup means luxurious get-warm sessions after morning surf; but we'll see...
 

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I will probably be buying a 2016 Transit 250, high roof, long bed (NOT extended). I’m going to convert it into a camper van as it will be my full time home so I want to include a shower. No doubt the extended bed would be better suited for a shower but the Transit I’m looking at is a really good deal and is the long bed version.

QUESTIONS:

1) Have any of you guys built a shower into your high roof long bed Transit?

2) Can you describe the general layout you went with, please?

Thanks!😀
My build is in a 148 extended and I was mindful to save space concerning functioality I knew I would spend little time doing. Yes, a shower is essential especially as a full timer, but you don't live/spend much time in the shower. Are you going to be single? If not how does your significant other feel about it?

I was first introduced to the concept of a hidden shower by an experianced single van lifer that told me not to build a shower stall because you just don't spend enough time in it to justify the use of space. He had a shower stall and swore he would not do it again. His rational worked for me so I opted for a hidden shower desighn sunk into the floor with a trap door that opens to expose the stainless steel shower pan. I took inspiration from this video
and this video
.

One thing about van design I think most will agree with is the more dual and tripple use of space you have desined into your van the better. You have a limited amount of space to work with, so set YOUR priorities and choose what is best for you and your needs.
 

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I will probably be buying a 2016 Transit 250, high roof, long bed (NOT extended). I’m going to convert it into a camper van as it will be my full time home so I want to include a shower. No doubt the extended bed would be better suited for a shower but the Transit I’m looking at is a really good deal and is the long bed version.

QUESTIONS:

1) Have any of you guys built a shower into your high roof long bed Transit?

2) Can you describe the general layout you went with, please?

Thanks!😀
While not Transit-specific the Louis The Van kids have some really clever shower designs (and their aesthetics are really, really impressive).

 

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Another idea to consider that won’t require the space for a shower is to have attachments on the cieling that a shower curtain can quickly attach to and detach that would encircle me in the hallway. I would have to figure out a simple base I can stand in while showering that’s tall enough to catch the water but can also be easily stored without taking a lot of space. Something that folds and stows flat would be ideal. Got any ideas?
You just about exactly described my shower stall.



The Helio has since been replaced by shower water in "cartridges", a Sous Vide heater and a 12V pump. We use it year-round almost every day.


 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
That's my point. I use maybe half a gallon, and that's only when I want to wash my hair. Otherwise a pint via sponge. I do it outside with nothing more than a used water container, and it takes all of ten minutes once a week. It's not worth any space at all to me. But to each his own.

Cheers.
Cleaning your bod only once a week is gnarly if you’re physically active every day and living around other humans. You said you do it outside but what about when it’s frikkin cold?
 

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"I didn't wash today. I wasn't dirty. If I'm not dirty, I don't wash. Some weeks I don't have to shower at all. I just groom my three basic areas: teeth, hair, and bunghole. And to save time, I use the same brush.“
George Carlin,
book Brain Droppings
 

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The longer version
And I’ll tell you something else, my well-scrubbed friends. You don’t always need a shower every day. Did you know that? It’s overkill! Unless you work out, or work outdoors, or for some reason come in intimate contact with huge amounts of filth and garbage every day, you don’t always need a shower. All you really need is to wash the four key areas: armpits, bunghole, crotch, and teeth! Got that? The hooker’s bath. Armpits, bunghole, crotch, and teeth. In fact, you can save yourself a whole lot of time if you simply use the same brush on all four areas!

George Carlin
 

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Cleaning your bod only once a week is gnarly if you’re physically active every day and living around other humans. You said you do it outside but what about when it’s frikkin cold?
This idea of daily showers to avoid mythical clouds of obnoxious odors while wasting countless gallons of water is a modern city-slicker fallacy that makes very little sense for an off-grid adventurer lifestyle.

Most of the odor you reference is from clothing, which is a separate issue entirely. The body itself is much easier. Sponge baths (or some version thereof) can be done as often as necessary in just a few minutes. 99% of getting clean is hands, under arms, and face, which are easy to quickly clean with a sink, wash towel, soap, and dry towel. Clean wipes are great for the slightly trickier privates. It's all a five minute affair, and uses half a pint of water. Finish with deodorant and clean clothes, and you're good as new.

Only hair takes more effort, and even it just requires a few minutes and some basic human fortitude. I just washed my hair outside two days ago in January with cold water and it didn't even register as any kind of pain. I waited until the afternoon like anyone with sense would. It took all of three minutes. Hardly worth a second thought. It's a briefly refreshing moment that passes in an instant.

Winter is actually your friend because everything smells better. Cold reduces microbial activity.

Then again, I've been backpacking all my life, often for weeks at a time, doing grueling climbs in summer and winter alike, so I guess I have a different sensibility when it comes to excessive hygiene.

Heck, there's even a credible theory that the uptick in modern health problems like allergies are partly due to excessive washing. A little dirt never hurt anyone, but immune stimulating soil microbes almost certainly have helped everyone.

But the main issue is water. I have a 25 gallon tank and refilling it is about the only reason I have to leave remote places I'm otherwise stoked to be exploring. I'm not wasting water for an unnecessary city luxury.

Cheers.
 

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Gotta agree with the "don't really need a shower" side. But depends on the activities as well. But cleaning off after a couple days of good, solid work - running, hiking, biking, skinning, snowboarding - is a treat all by itself. 😁
 
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