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Discussion Starter #1
Stock tire size for the full size Ford Transit is listed as
235/65/R16 tires with a ~28" OD x 9.25W

I realize this posting may be premature as there are few of the rigs on the roads at this time...

But i'm wondering if anyone has done the math and figured out what _should_ work in the stock wheel wells?
Taller tires IMO would really aid in
1) a wee bit more ground clearance
2) a bit less anemic looking rig

Doing some playing at the Tire Size Comparison site gives some ideas:

245/75/16 is 30.5" OD x 9.65W
265/75/16 is 31.6" OD x 10.43W

Now what i can say from experience with a former rig (2007 Tacoma 4x4) we went from stock tire size to the similar 245 above (yet on the stock 17" rims). Since we kept the tread width basically the same (+1/2"w) there was no issue with tire rub in this rig/situation. Time will tell what tire size will fit in those wells. I look forward to the findings of early adopters.

----and on more ground clearance ideas...??
I also wonder what type of easy mods will be possible for small ~2 to 3" lift? Will something as easy/simple as torson key swap (etc...?) from a Ford F150 be possible?

It will be fun to see what some shops come up with. I can imagine ppl doing these simple (?) mods quite early in the game. I know for my wife and i in Van2 they will be within the first few weeks of ownership if possible.

Thom
 

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I noticed they are run a 65 profile, I will be running a 75 or possibly 85 profile on my ist tire change. The main reason is to bring the rpms down so to gain MPG on the open road. The Ecoboost and the diesel have more than enough torque to pull the van. However if some one is usung their van for contract work and always carring 3,000+ lbs. this may not work for you
 

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My reason for changing to larger 265/75/16 tires on my Sprinter was looks. I have a hard time dealing with little tires on a large van. Interesting that the larger tires on the Sprinter did make the speedometer accurate (odometer inaccurate) and gave 1/2 mpg better fuel economy. Any gain/loss in fuel economy will affected by multiple factors so it is a crap shoot if fuel economy improves or declines.

I have looked at the Transit and do not see where larger tires in the wheel wells will be a problem. Maybe in front with steering at the end of its travel will be a problem? The spare tire well looks like it will be a problem. Side to side is OK but front to back may not take a larger tire. Spare is also mounted on a black painted wheel instead of silver that was on the running wheels.
 

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It's interesting that Ford didn't fit a 225/75/16 on the transit. This is the standard size on T1N sprinters, and there are a ton of options in all season, all terrain, off road and snow and ice already available. Currently on tirerack, there are 2 options in the transits 235/65/16 size. The major difference is over all diameter. 27.5 vs 29.3. I don't think that less than two inches in overall diameter will be a problem.

I expect my Transit to be delivered in the dead of winter, so Wrangler Pro-grades in 225/75/16 will be going on immediately after delivery. Fingers crossed they will clear on full steering lock.

When plugging the different sizes into a gear ratio calculator, I discovered the speedometer will be off a little, but I can live with that. I also found that the two inch difference in diameter effectively splits the difference between the 3.73 and 3.31 ratio. So perhaps it wouldn't be ideal to run a larger diameter with the 3.31 for the sake of lugging the engine, and increasing trans temps.
 

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It's interesting that Ford didn't fit a 225/75/16 on the transit. This is the standard size on T1N sprinters, and there are a ton of options in all season, all terrain, off road and snow and ice already available. Currently on tirerack, there are 2 options in the transits 235/65/16 size. The major difference is over all diameter. 27.5 vs 29.3. I don't think that less than two inches in overall diameter will be a problem.

I expect my Transit to be delivered in the dead of winter, so Wrangler Pro-grades in 225/75/16 will be going on immediately after delivery. Fingers crossed they will clear on full steering lock.

When plugging the different sizes into a gear ratio calculator, I discovered the speedometer will be off a little, but I can live with that. I also found that the two inch difference in diameter effectively splits the difference between the 3.73 and 3.31 ratio. So perhaps it wouldn't be ideal to run a larger diameter with the 3.31 for the sake of lugging the engine, and increasing trans temps.

I agree with you math I too have a Sprinter, however if you go with the Eco boost, their will be no lugging;)
 

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It's interesting that Ford didn't fit a 225/75/16 on the transit. This is the standard size on T1N sprinters, and there are a ton of options in all season, all terrain, off road and snow and ice already available. Currently on tirerack, there are 2 options in the transits 235/65/16 size. The major difference is over all diameter. 27.5 vs 29.3. I don't think that less than two inches in overall diameter will be a problem.

I expect my Transit to be delivered in the dead of winter, so Wrangler Pro-grades in 225/75/16 will be going on immediately after delivery. Fingers crossed they will clear on full steering lock.

When plugging the different sizes into a gear ratio calculator, I discovered the speedometer will be off a little, but I can live with that. I also found that the two inch difference in diameter effectively splits the difference between the 3.73 and 3.31 ratio. So perhaps it wouldn't be ideal to run a larger diameter with the 3.31 for the sake of lugging the engine, and increasing trans temps.
Putting larger tires on my Sprinter made the speedo more accurate. Gotta ask a current owner how close the oem setup is to accurate. My understanding is euro vehicles are effectively required by statute to overstate your velocity. Transit I dunno, but if Ford van history is a guide they will overstate, so a larger tire should make it more accurate, not less.
 

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I'm going with the diesel and 3.73 LSD. So larger diameter won't bother it, but when I drove the EB there wasn't much going on below 2500 rpm.
 

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Good luck finding something with an equivalent load rating... 121/119R is a very high load rating for the size. Anything else in that size will not have the same load carrying capacity.
 

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I noticed they are run a 65 profile, I will be running a 75 or possibly 85 profile on my ist tire change. The main reason is to bring the rpms down so to gain MPG on the open road. The Ecoboost and the diesel have more than enough torque to pull the van. However if some one is usung their van for contract work and always carring 3,000+ lbs. this may not work for you
Changing axle ratio, if possible, may be a more efficient way to accomplish lowering of RPMs if higher MPGs is the goal. Of course there is no guarantee that lower RPMs will work -- depends on engine load. If engine ends up running more in 5th versus 6th then change may be negative.

Anyway, taller tires raise the vehicle and that usually hurts fuel economy. That's why lowering RPMs through gearing is normally more efficient. Granted, most people like bigger tires because of looks and because it cost much less.

As a side note, it's interesting Ford is not offering 3.55 gears. Previously they offered 3.31, 3.55, 3.73, and 4.10.
 

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>>> Granted, most people like bigger tires because of looks and because it cost much less.

And to help clear steep driveways, like mine.
 

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Changing axle ratio, if possible, may be a more efficient way to accomplish lowering of RPMs if higher MPGs is the goal. Of course there is no guarantee that lower RPMs will work -- depends on engine load. If engine ends up running more in 5th versus 6th then change may be negative.

Anyway, taller tires raise the vehicle and that usually hurts fuel economy. That's why lowering RPMs through gearing is normally more efficient. Granted, most people like bigger tires because of looks and because it cost much less.

As a side note, it's interesting Ford is not offering 3.55 gears. Previously they offered 3.31, 3.55, 3.73, and 4.10.
What ratio would you buy for a long WB tall van with the 3.5 Ecoboost? Ford seems to select the 3.31 on all the Ecoboosts I have seen and the 3.73 for the 3.7. The Ecoboost does produce its torque at lower engine speeds.
 

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What ratio would you buy for a long WB tall van with the 3.5 Ecoboost? Ford seems to select the 3.31 on all the Ecoboosts I have seen and the 3.73 for the 3.7. The Ecoboost does produce its torque at lower engine speeds.
I'm not considering an EcoBoost, but regardless of engine I would likely go with the taller standard gearing because of two factors: I don't tow often enough to warrant lower gears, and I live in a very flat part of the country. I think the standard 3.7L V6 with 4.10 gears has a significant GCWR advantage over the 3.73 gears so that's the only factor that may sway my thinking.

Whether the engine produces max torque at lower or higher RPMs isn't that important to me. What's more important is available versus required torque at that RPM; hence not whether it's close to peak or not.
 

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It looks like we will be taking the tires off of the dead 6.0L E450 and putting them on the Transit. They are 225/75/16s - the same as on our Sprinter. My tire guy was having trouble finding studs in the stock sizes. I will have to do some road testing to verify the odometer.
 

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It looks like we will be taking the tires off of the dead 6.0L E450 and putting them on the Transit. They are 225/75/16s - the same as on our Sprinter. My tire guy was having trouble finding studs in the stock sizes. I will have to do some road testing to verify the odometer.[/QUOT




Keep in mind the difference in max load (Lbs.) is over a 1,000 lbs, a tire. So your loosing about 4,000 Lbs from your gvwr
 

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It looks like we will be taking the tires off of the dead 6.0L E450 and putting them on the Transit. They are 225/75/16s - the same as on our Sprinter. My tire guy was having trouble finding studs in the stock sizes. I will have to do some road testing to verify the odometer.[/QUOT




Keep in mind the difference in max load (Lbs.) is over a 1,000 lbs, a tire. So your loosing about 4,000 Lbs from your gvwr
The 225/75s have a higher load rating than what is available in the stock sizes.
 

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The 225/75s are rated at 2650 for singles the 195/75s are rated at 2150 for singles. My tire guy doesn't have any studdable winter tires in the bigger tire size of the right load range. Even at 2500/ tire, that comes to 15,000 lb which is well over the GVWR.
 
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